U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-36 out of 36 stories.
<< < 1 | 2

15-Jul-2002
Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons
A small, portable detector for finding concealed nuclear weapons and materials has been developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. When fully developed, the device could assist international inspectors charged with preventing smuggling and unauthorized use of nuclear weapons and materials.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

10-May-2002
Near-frictionless carbon coating nears commercial applications
Four years and more than 3,000 phone calls and e-mail contacts later, Argonne's "near-frictionless carbon" coating stands on the brink of commercialization. A sample of the coating on a sapphire substrate survived 17.5 million passes of a steel ball. After 32 days, the testing machine failed, but the ball left only a barely visible track on the coating.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
New ceramic membranes may help hydrogen replace gasoline as auto fuel
If hydrogen fuel cells are ever to replace gasoline engines in cars, they will need a cheap source of high-purity hydrogen -- and Argonne technology could provide one. Argonne's Energy Technology Division has developed a ceramic membrane that can extract hydrogen from methane, the chief component of natural gas.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Passively safe reactors rely on nature to keep them cool
The basic purpose of reactor safety is to protect the public and plant workers from harmful radiation exposure. The goal of modern safety design is to provide this protection by relying on the laws of nature, rather than on engineered systems that require power to operate, equipment to function properly and operators to take correct actions in stressful emergency situations. To achieve this, you have to remove decay heat, contain radioactive materials, and maintain a proper balance between heat generation and heat removal.

Contact: Dave Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
630-252-5584
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Researchers reach to the skies to reveal the secrets of the stars
In 2003, Argonne scientists will analyze solar wind--single atoms and electrically charged particles from the sun--samples from NASA's Genesis mission in an effort to better understand how the planets formed and how the sun works. If successful, Genesis will become the first mission to return a sample of extraterrestrial material from beyond the moon. These samples will allow a precise measure of the elemental and isotopic composition of our most important star - the sun.

Contact: Steve Koppes
s-koppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Taking the heat off: Nanofluids promise efficient heat transfer
By manipulating atoms on the smallest of scales, Argonne scientists have created a next-generation fluid that may revolutionize heat transfer. By adding tiny spherical particles to a conventional fluid, researchers can improve by up to 40 percent its ability to transfer heat.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Award-winning gasoline reformer is a catalyst for change
Instead of spark plugs and cylinders, environmentally friendly fuel cell engines may be under the hoods of the cars of the future. But first, scientists must find a practical and economical way to supply the hydrogen gas needed to power them. Chemical engineers at Argonne have developed and patented a compact fuel processor that “reforms” ordinary gasoline into a hydrogen-rich gas to power fuel cells.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
New lens could help find cancer tumors earlier
The new lens technology, developed by scientists at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, uses gamma rays diffracted by a set of 828 copper crystal cubes arranged in 13 concentric rings in a disk slightly smaller than a dinner plate. The lens focuses the gamma radiation emitted from a small radioactive source in the body of a patient into a small, well-shielded detector.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Argonne Wakefield Accelerator supplies more Big Bang for buck
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated a technique — called wakefield acceleration — that can power a linear, high-energy particle accelerator by using a low-energy particle accelerator like a booster in a multistage rocket. This could make possible collisions powerful enough to generate particles not seen since the Big Bang.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5501
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Faster, lighter computers possible with nanotechnology
Smaller, lighter computers and an end to worries about electrical failures sending hours of on-screen work into an inaccessible limbo mark the potential result of Argonne research on tiny ferroelectric crystals.

Contact: Richard Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
630-252-5565
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-36 out of 36 stories.
<< < 1 | 2

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map