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Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 50 stories.
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23-May-2012
New research shows brain injuries from blasts similar to football impacts
In an advance that may someday provide health benefits for soldiers and athletes, a team of researchers has discovered a mechanism that could be the cause of traumatic brain injuries in blast-exposed soldiers.

Contact: Stephen P. Wampler
wampler1@llnl.gov
925-423-3107
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

30-Dec-2011
Foy's fun with science a career highlight
During a science experiment, Frances Foy helped a fifth grade student dip a blown-up balloon into a container of liquid nitrogen. As the balloon shriveled amid a cloud of white vapor while classmates 'oohed' and 'aahed' in amazement, Foy asked, "What is happening? Something is changing." For two decades, Foy has been demonstrating the wonders of science like this one that explains the states of matter.

Contact: Linda A. Lucchetti
lucchetti1@llnl.gov
925-422-5815
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-Mar-2010
Time's rising tide may swamp Delta marshes
While marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta area are currently keeping pace with rising sea levels, they may not be sustainable under future sea-level increases.

Contact: Anne M. Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

8-Apr-2009
Department of Energy announces completion of world's largest laser
The National Nuclear Security Administration has certified the completion of the historic effort to build the world's largest laser.

Contact: Lynda Seaver
seaver1@llnl.gov
925-423-3103
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

13-Feb-2006
Mimicking nature's crystalline structures
Scientists and engineers have long envied nature's ability to design crystalline structures whose properties are often superior to those of similar synthetic materials. Through a process called biomineralization, proteins orchestrate the growth processes of many natural minerals into designs that confer exceptional properties.

Contact: Jim De Yoreo
deyoreo1@llnl.gov
925-423-4240
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
The search for methane in Earth's mantle
Petroleum geologists have long searched beneath Earth's surface for oil and gas, knowing that hydrocarbons form from the decomposition of plants and animals buried over time.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
A random walk through time and space
IN 1905, Albert Einstein published five papers that shook the world of physics. His elegant arguments and conclusions were marvels of physical intuition that addressed dilemmas raised by experimental evidence.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

21-Jul-2005
The grand challenge of thermonuclear ignition
Scientists often refer to formidable scientific and technological hurdles with far-reaching consequences as grand challenges. One of the enduring grand challenges is achieving nuclear fusion--the power source of the Sun and stars and the physical process at the core of Livermore's national security mission--in a laboratory environment.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-May-2005
Addressing national security needs benefits energy and environment
Lawrence Livermore's Energy and Environment Directorate conducts a wide range of research projects in the geologic, atmospheric, and environmental sciences to address challenges in national security, environmental remediation, and energy supply.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-May-2005
Do black holes exist? Or are they really 'dark energy stars'?
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist George Chapline says that black holes do not really exist. Instead, he proposes that the mass of compact astrophysical objects consists of the same dark energy that makes up 60 percent of the mass of the universe.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-Mar-2005
Gamma-ray bursts shower the universe with metals
According to the results from a Livermore computer model, some of the small change jingling in your pocket contains zinc and copper created in massive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that rank as the most impressive light shows in the universe.

Contact: Jason Pruet
pruet1@llnl.gov
925-422-5850
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

24-Mar-2005
Enhanced national security through international research collaborations
National security today requires broad and effective engagement in the international arena.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

14-Feb-2005
Mining geothermal resources
It's beautiful on beaches and receives kudos for its use in paint, tires, paper, toothpaste, and even in kitty litter--but it's a real pain in geothermal power plants.

Contact: Bill Bourcier
bourcier1@llnl.gov
925-423-3745
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

11-Feb-2005
Experiment and theory have a partner: Simulation
Even before Lawrence Livermore opened in September 1952, cofounders E. O. Lawrence and Edward Teller recognized the need for a computer and placed an order for one of the first production Univacs.

Contact: Mark Seager
seager1@llnl.gov
925-423-3141
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Feb-2005
Russian weapons workers begin new commercial venture
One of the most remarkable political developments of the 20th century was the collapse of the Soviet Union. The satisfaction in the West of the downfall of communism, however, has been tempered by increasing worries that nuclear weapon materials and expertise might be transferred from the former Soviet Union (FSU) to unfriendly nations or even terrorist groups.

Contact: Jay Zucca
zucca2@llnl.gov
925-422-4895
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2005
A passion for computation benefits every discipline
It's no secret that computers are in Lawrence Livermore's blood. That passion for computation was one of the principal factors that brought me to Livermore three years ago to become associate director of Computation.

Contact: Science and Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
X rays, detonations, and dead zones
The rapid, violent detonation of a high explosive (HE) generates supersonic shock waves that transfer energy by moving mass. According to Livermore physicist John Molitoris, trying to gather data on what happens to a material during this split second is often a case of "smoke and mirrors."

Contact: John Molitoris
molitoris1@llnl.gov
925-423-3496
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
The Art of protein structure prediction
From hemoglobin that carries oxygen, to enzymes and hormones that turn cells on and off, to antibodies that fight infection, proteins seem to do it all.

Contact: Krzysztof Fidelis
fidelis1@llnl.gov
925-423-4752
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
Putting the squeeze on materials
Few gemstones are as mesmerizing as diamonds. Livermore physicists also find diamonds attractive but for reasons other than their beauty. The researchers use flawless, polished diamonds in opposing pairs, or anvils, to slowly compress samples of materials at extreme pressures.

Contact: Samuel Weir
weir3@llnl.gov
925-422-2462
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
It's all in motion when simulating fluids
WHETHER it's the mechanics of a supernova, the ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule, or the detonation of a nuclear weapon, simulating the motion of fluids is anything but simple. Every piece of the model is moving. Fluids interact with each other and with solid materials, plus those interactions occur quickly and at intense pressures and temperatures.

Contact: Jim Rathkopf
rathkopf@llnl.gov
925-422-4602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Magnetically levitated train takes flight
SINCE the 1960s, transportation industry planners have sought an energy-efficient design for a train that can glide through air at speeds up to 500 kilometers per hour.

Contact: Richard Post
post3@llnl.gov
925-422-9853
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Shutting down genes in cancer, bacteria, and viruses
Ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference is a relatively new technique in which small molecules called short interfering RNA (siRNA) can be inserted into cells to turn off a chosen gene.

Contact: Allen Christian
christian4@llnl.gov
925-424-5909
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Laser burrows into the Earth to destroy land mines
ONE of the great scourges of warfare is the land mine. Although an effective battlefield weapon, land mines kill or maim nearly 45,000 civilians (including 20,000 children) worldwide every year.

Contact: Mark Rotter
rotter1@llnl.gov
925-422-8370
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

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