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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 50 stories.
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1-Nov-2004
Getting the big picture
Dozens to hundreds of interconnected personal computers (PCs), stacked up row after row and operating simultaneously: that in a nutshell describes many of the latest high-performance supercomputers.

Contact: Sean Ahern
seanahern@llnl.gov
925-422-1648
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Detecting bioaerosols when time is of the essence
About seven years ago, Livermore researchers received seed funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program to develop an instrument that counters bioterrorism by providing a rapid early warning system for pathogens, such as anthrax.

Contact: Richard Langlois
langlois1@llnl.gov
925-422-5616
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Virtual problem solving for homeland security
Probing attack on the water treatment plant! The mayor and other emergency responders evacuate schools, respond to medical emergencies, and pursue the perpetrators. Fortunately for the town of Opelika, Alabama, the attack was purely hypothetical.

Contact: Rob Hills
hills1@llnl.gov
925-423-7344
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Exploring the ultrawideband
Lawrence Livermore research efforts and inventions quietly advance many fields. In one instance, however, a Livermore invention that stemmed from laser research has spawned a variety of new commercial products, including some that support national and homeland security.

Contact: Steve Azevedo
azevedo3@lln.gov
925-422-8538
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

13-Jul-2004
This instrument keeps the beat
As part of their responsibilities for stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile, Livermore researchers study the behavior of materials detonated with high explosives or struck with projectiles at extreme velocities. In diagnosing these experiments, researchers must measure velocities as great as 3,000 meters per second over distances from less than 0.5 millimeter to more than 50 millimeters.

Contact: Ted Strand
otstrand@llnl.gov
925-423-2062
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Nuclear energy to go: A self-contained, portable reactor
Nuclear energy supplies 20 percent of the electricity used in the U.S. and 16 percent of that used throughout the world. But as the global use of nuclear energy grows, so do concerns about the vulnerability of nuclear plants and fuel materials to misuse or attacks by terrorists.

Contact: Craig Smith
smith94@llnl.gov
925-423-1772
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Going to extremes
Little is known about the chemistry that produces minerals in the deep regions of Earth or that creates the ammonia oceans of the outer planets and moons. What is known is that an element's fundamental properties--its optical, structural, electrical, and magnetic characteristics--can completely change when it is put under extreme conditions.

Contact: Larry Fried
fried1@llnl.gov
925-422-7796
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Helping water managers ensure clean and reliable supplies
MOST Americans take cheap and plentiful supplies of pure drinking water for granted. Some even consider it to be an inalienable right. However, clean water sources, especially pristine underground aquifers, are being consumed at an increasing rate, and contaminants and changing patterns in rain and snowfall are threatening the adequacy of supplies.

Contact: Robin Newmark
newmark1@llnl.gov
925-423-3644
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Shocking plutonium to reveal its secrets
One of the most daunting scientific and engineering challenges today is ensuring the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear arsenal. To effectively meet that challenge, scientists need better data showing how plutonium, a key component of nuclear warheads, behaves under extreme pressures and temperatures. On July 8, 2003, Lawrence Livermore researchers performed the inaugural experiment of a 30-meter-long, two-stage gas gun designed to obtain those data.

Contact: Mark Martinez
martinez17@llnl.gov
925-423-7572
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Strategic supercomputing comes of age
With the birth of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), the need for better computer simulations became paramount to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile remained safe, reliable, and capable of meeting performance requirements.

Contact: Randy Christensen
christensen5@llnl.gov
925-423-3054
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Seeing the universe in a grain of dust
Imagine traveling halfway to Jupiter--3.2 billion kilometers--for a small handful of comet dust. That's the mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Stardust spacecraft launched on February 7, 1999. This past January, Stardust flew by Comet Wild 2's nucleus and through a halo of gases and dust at the comet's head, collecting cometary dust particles released from the surface just hours before.

Contact: John Bradley
bradely33@llnl.gov
925-423-0666
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
Engine shows diesel efficiency without the emissions
Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced harmful emissions.

Contact: Salvador Aceves
aceves6@llnl.gov
925-422-0864
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
Defending against corrosion
Livermore researchers are designing a rugged system to prevent nuclear wastes from seeping into the environment at the proposed underground repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Contact: Dan McCright
mccright1@llnl.gov
925-422-7051
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
On the front lines of biodefense
The Laboratory's pathogen bioinformatics group is developing ways to rapidly identify microbes that could pose a threat to the nation's citizens, livestock, and crops.

Contact: Thomas Slezak
slezak1@llnl.gov
925-422-5746
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

9-Feb-2004
Elbert Branscomb selected as Associate Director for Biology and Biotechnology Research
Elbert Branscomb, the chief scientist for the Department of Energy's Genome Program and the former director of the Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek has been selected as the new Associate Director for Biology and Biotechnology Research (BBRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The appointment is effective immediately. Branscomb will replace Bert Weinstein, who has served as acting associate director for the directorate since 2000.

Contact: Susan Houghton
houghton3@llnl.gov
925-422-9919
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-May-2002
Forensic science center maximizes the tiniest clue
Lawrence Livermore's Forensic Science Center combination of human and technological resources has made it among the best of its kind for collecting and analyzing virtually any kind of evidence, some of it no larger than a few billionths of a gram. Its resources, expertise, tools, and techniques are applied to all kinds of cases, from the September 11 World Trade Center attack to the spread of anthrax spores, from multiple homicides to nuclear materials smuggling.

Contact: Brian Andresen
andresen1@llnl.gov
925-422-0903
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Bright future for tactical laser weapons
In a demonstration at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) burned a 1-centimeter-diameter hole straight through a 2-centimeter-thick stack of steel samples in 6 seconds. The electrical current to do so came from a wall outlet and cost no more than 30 cents. While large chemical lasers have successfully shot down tactical rockets, the SSHCL design supports the weight and size requirements for a future mobile deployment.

Contact: C. Brent Dane
dane1@llnl.gov
925-424-5905
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Quantum simulations tell the atomic-level story
With quantum molecular dynamics simulations, scientists can get an accurate picture of what happens to individual atoms during an experiment.

Contact: Giulia Galli
galli@llnl.gov
925-423-4223
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-Mar-2002
Tracking down virulence in plague
How do the plague pathogen and its host interact? Scientists will apply the answer to understanding a larger set of possible agents of biological terrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
From kilobytes to petabytes in 50 years
"The day when the scientist, no matter how devoted, can make significant progress alone and without material help has passed." - E.O. Lawrence, founder of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on accepting the 1939 Nobel Prize for Physics.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
L-Gel decontaminates better than bleach
Scientists have developed a material that is safe for people and the environment but deadly to the agents of biological and chemical warfare.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Faster inspection of laser coatings
Lasers have been a Lawrence Livermore specialty almost since the first laser flashed in 1960. Dealing with the challenges that arise as these lasers get bigger and more powerful is, of necessity, a specialty too.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Rapid field detection of biological agents
Livermore scientists have developed two portable biodetection systems to help in the fight against bioterrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Simulating turbulence in magnetic fusion plasmas
Powerful three-dimensional simulations are helping researchers to speed the development of magnetic fusion energy.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Nov-2001
National Lab astrophysicists explore supernovae with an eye on national security
The SciDAC program within DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research supports High Energy and Nuclear Physics research in the use of terascale computers to dramatically extend exploration of the fundamental processes of nature, as well as advance the ability to predict the behavior of a broad range of complex natural and engineered systems.

Contact: Anne M. Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 50 stories.
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