U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 278 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


31-Jul-2015
Magnetism at nanoscale
As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique optical magnetometer to probe magnetism at the nano- and mesoscale.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

28-Jul-2015
Rigors of the road: ORNL invention will support licensing and transport of spent nuclear fuel
With support from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester. Combined with ongoing fuel transportation research, data from the CIRFT system will help facilitate cask designs and transportation protocols that ensure safe transportation of spent nuclear fuel.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Jul-2015
Robert Harrison leads new center to consolidate and showcase Brookhaven Lab's computing capabilities
As leader of the new Center for Data-Driven Discovery (C3D) at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Robert Harrison aims to consolidate and capitalize on the Lab's existing world-leading capabilities in big data to advance science initiatives across the Lab and to foster increased collaboration with academia and industry.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Jul-2015
Brookhaven Lab summer school helps develop tomorrow's nuclear chemistry experts
For the past six weeks, 12 college students have had the opportunity to learn all that the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has to teach about a vital but often overlooked area of chemistry -- one that spans everything from nuclear reactors and the safe handling of nuclear material to hospital diagnostic tools and cutting-edge medical research.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

22-Jul-2015
Whole lotta shakin' goin' on
It took decades for technology to catch up with the math David Smallwood worked out to control vibration table shakers. Smallwood, a retired Sandia National Laboratories researcher who consults at the labs, knew that shaking in all directions at once was the key to realistic parts testing. Now Sandia is putting the algorithms he developed more than 30 years ago to the test.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

21-Jul-2015
Tracing the evolution of a drug-resistant pathogen
Sandia National Laboratories researchers are studying antibiotic-resistant pathogens to aid in the fight against them.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

10-Jul-2015
New design could dramatically boost efficiency of low-cost solar panels
A new material design tested in experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could make low-cost solar panels far more efficient by greatly enhancing their ability to collect the sun's energy and release it as electricity.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Jul-2015
It all comes to light
New advances, including light sources, allow for non-destructive techniques for examining old artifacts.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/US Department of Energy

7-Jul-2015
Big PanDA and Titan merge to tackle torrent of LHC's full-energy collision data
With the successful restart of the Large Hadron Collider, now operating at nearly twice its former collision energy, comes an enormous increase in the volume of data physicists must sift through to search for new discoveries. Fortunately, a remarkable data-management tool developed by physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of Texas at Arlington is evolving to meet the big-data challenge.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Jul-2015
Scientists drive tiny shock waves through diamond
Researchers have used an X-ray laser to record, in detail never possible before, the microscopic motion and effects of shock waves rippling across diamond. The technique, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, allows scientists to precisely explore the complex physics driving massive star explosions, which are critical for understanding fusion energy, and to improve scientific models used to study these phenomena.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jul-2015
Upgrades to ATLAS and LHC magnets for Run 2 and beyond
At the beginning of June, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European research facility, began smashing together protons once again. Physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory were busy throughout Long Shutdown 1, undertaking projects designed to maximize the LHC's chances of detecting rare new physics as the collider reaches into a previous unexplored subatomic frontier.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Jun-2015
Homegrown solution for synchrotron light source
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have made advances in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to help better study electronic properties of new materials.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kbgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

29-Jun-2015
Magnetic attraction
Researchers studying a broad spectrum of science, including biofuel production processes, climate effects on carbon cycling in the soil and carbon transformations in the atmosphere will soon have access to EMSL's new 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Scientists are eager to start getting molecular-level information for their research, and six inaugural studies were selected to use the new instrument through a Special Science Call.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

24-Jun-2015
Berkeley Lab scientists to develop better way to screen chemicals for cancer-causing effects
Berkeley Lab scientists are developing a cell culture that could help researchers better identify chemicals that increase breast cancer susceptibility. The scientists will grow the culture using adult stem cells obtained from breast tissue. Their test will show if a chemical causes a breakdown in cell-to-cell communication, a fundamental defect of cancer.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Jun-2015
Summer in the Arctic
Researchers supported by the Office of Science are doing 'cool' new research this summer.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/US Department of Energy

23-Jun-2015
Scientists mix matter and anti-matter to resolve decade-old proton puzzle
Fans of science and science fiction have been warned that mixing matter with anti-matter can yield explosive results. And that's just what physicists were counting on, in hopes of blowing wide open a puzzle that has confounded them for the last decade.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

19-Jun-2015
SLAC research resumes at upgraded Large Hadron Collider
Research with the Large Hadron Collider has officially resumed: The world's largest particle accelerator at CERN began on June 3 to collect data at a new record energy that could hold the key to new scientific discoveries. To keep up with the boost in performance, researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have developed new technologies for ATLAS -- one of two experiments involved in the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jun-2015
Adapting nanoscience imaging tools to study ants' heat-deflecting adaptations
A new study shows that the tiny hairs of Saharan silver ants possess crucial adaptive features that allow the ants to regulate their body temperatures and survive the scorching hot conditions of their desert habitat. To study how the hairs allow the creatures to control electromagnetic waves in this manner, the Columbia Engineering research team turned to the resources and expertise available at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-Jun-2015
What the blank makes quantum dots blink?
Quantum dots promise an astounding range of applications, if scientists can conquer their annoying habit of blinking. Researchers computing at NERSC recently ran simulations that offer new insights into the problem.

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10-Jun-2015
Newly discovered property could help beat the heat problem in computer chips
X-ray studies at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have for the first time observed an exotic property that could warp the electronic structure of a material in a way that reduces heat buildup and improves performance in ever-smaller computer components.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Jun-2015
President Obama honors Claudio Pellegrini with Enrico Fermi Award
Claudio Pellegrini, a visiting scientist and consulting professor at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, will receive the 2014 Enrico Fermi Award for his role in laying the scientific groundwork for the X-ray free-electron laser.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Jun-2015
Meraculous: Deciphering the 'book of life' with supercomputers
A team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, JGI and UC Berkeley, simplified and sped up genome assembly, reducing a months-long process to mere minutes. This was primarily achieved by 'parallelizing' the code to harness the processing power of supercomputers, such as NERSC's Edison system.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

28-May-2015
Carbon nanothreads from compressed benzene
The thinnest possible linear thread that still retains a diamond-like structure was created by the extreme compression and decompression of the common chemical benzene. The threads may have outstanding mechanical and electronic properties. Further, the synthesis method opens up possible variations that could lead to materials presently unknown or impossible to make with existing techniques.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

27-May-2015
Spiraling laser pulses could change the nature of graphene
A new study predicts that researchers could use spiraling pulses of laser light to change the nature of graphene, turning it from a metal into an insulator and giving it other peculiar properties that might be used to encode information.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-May-2015
The 'why' of models
An international team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Macquarie University, the University of Western Sydney and the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry set out to assess how two Free-Air CO2 Enrichment projects compared to eleven vegetation models that simulate various ecological processes. Instead of only benchmarking whether or not an individual model matched the experimental data, the researchers developed an 'assumption-centered' approach to evaluate why certain models performed better than others.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 278 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map