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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 1001-1025 out of 1073 stories.
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19-Jun-2001
Protein identification by mass spectrometry
ORNL researchers are improving mass spectrometry tools to speed up protein identification and to screen for disease-causing proteins and bacteria.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Surprises in the mouse genome
In the live organism, not all mouse and human genes have predictable functions, and proteins with similar structures can have different functions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Search for signs of inflammatory disease
You fall on your shoulder and tear some cartilage, causing bone to rub against bone. Your shoulder becomes inflamed and begins to hurt because cytokine, a small signal protein secreted by your immune system, has recruited white blood cells to clean up the damage.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Curing cancer in mice
ORNL researchers have shown that a radioisotope-bearing antibody can target the blood vessels of lung tumors in mice, destroying the tumors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
MicroCAT 'sees' hidden mouse defects
ORNL's X-ray computed tomography system allows internal defects and organ changes in small animals to be mapped.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Obesity-related gene in mouse discovered at ORNL
Some mice born at ORNL have grown dangerously fat, even though they have been on a low-fat diet since birth. Although they do not appear overweight, these mice have a mutated gene that plays a strong role in causing obesity in the form of internal fat deposits that are hazardous to their health.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Mouse models for the human disease of chronic hereditary tyrosinemia
When a section of mouse chromosome 7 containing the coat color c gene is deleted by exposing mice to radiation, "albino" mice are born with a white, hairless coat.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Searching for mouse models of human
Mutant mice are tested by ORNL researchers and their collaborators to determine if these mice have diseases similar to those that afflict humans. Therapies tried on mouse models could lead to new medical treatments.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Gene chip engineers
At ORNL, microarrays are being made faster and cheaper to study gene expression in cells from mice, fish, and other organisms.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Complex biological systems in mice
Using genetic engineering, gene microarrays, and computational technologies, ORNL researchers are deciphering genetic variations in the skin that lead to increased risk of disease from environmental factors.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Genes and proteins
Consider a living cell, the fundamental unit of life. Each human cell contains the entire human genome—some 35,000 genes. But only some genes are expressed within a specific cell, resulting in the production of specific proteins. The genes that turn on in a liver cell, for example, are different from the genes that are expressed in a brain cell.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

18-Jun-2001
Pricing programs spur growth of renewable energy technologies
"Green pricing" is an option utilities use to allow consumers to help support electrical production from renewable resources such as solar and wind. A new study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) identifies key factors for ensuring the success of "green pricing" programs and ranks programs nationwide for their relative effectiveness.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
303-275-4050
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

14-Jun-2001
Urban air quality — The difference between night and day
The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a collaboration of researchers measured the differences in air quality at sunrise in Phoenix, Arizona, in one of the most comprehensive studies ever done on the vertical structure of air pollution over a major urban area.

Contact: Dawn White
dawn.white@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Jun-2001
New findings on breast cancer reported at the annual AAAS meeting
New experimental findings by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) cell biologist Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff show that exposure to ionizing radiation creates a microenvironment in the tissue surrounding breast cells that can cause even nonirradiated cells and their progeny to become cancerous. The discovery suggests new and possibly more effective means for preventing breast cancer.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

4-Jun-2001
MAXIMA unveils high resolution picture of the early universe
New evidence derived from measurements of minute variations in the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have produced a new diagram of sound waves in the dense early universe. The graph, called a CMB "power spectrum," not only shows a primary resonance but is consistent with two more harmonics, or peaks.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

4-Jun-2001
Atomic scale tinker toys
Nanotechnology offers a potential cornucopia of benefits, from palm-sized supercomputers to synthesized antibodies to molecular-scale robots. Such wonders will be constructed from the ground up using nano-sized building blocks.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Stable isotope research resource
The ability to apply research techniques to important problems in biology and medicine depends on the availability of isotopically labeled compounds.

Contact: Clifford Unkefer
cju@lanl.gov
505-665-2560
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Early detection for protection
Being able to rapidly detect biological agents is among the most difficult and yet urgent tasks facing the nation. Whether the threat is from a natural outbreak or a terrorist's release of threat agents, medical treatment cannot effectively begin without first identifying the bioagent. At the same time, effective understanding and response to a biological threat requires rapid communication across the health-care system.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Protein crystallography resource at neutron research center for imaging proteins
Thanks to a $4.8 million capital commitment from the U.S. Department of Energy, Los Alamos researchers have completed a state-of-the-art neutron diffraction station at Los Alamos' Neutron Scattering Center, part of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, known as LANSCE. The new station went on line in December 2000.

Contact: Benno Schoenborn
schoenborn@lanl.gov
505-665-2033
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Shining a light on novel polymers
A rapidly growing field of research, recognized by a 2000 Nobel Prize in chemistry, focuses on electrically conductive plastic, once thought to be an impossibility.

Contact: Liaohai Chen
chen@lanl.gov
505-667-9305
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Biologically inspired nanotechnology
Much of today's scientific revolution is taking place at the nanometer scale. There is growing recognition that an ability to design and manipulate materials at the nanoscale will allow scientists to not only improve existing materials, but also develop entirely new classes of intelligent or "smart" materials for everything from miniaturized laboratories and micro-computers to drug delivery systems. To this end, lessons from biology offer revolutionary approaches.

Contact: Basil Swanson
basil@lanl.gov
505-667-5814
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The who's who of spotted owls
A unique molecular biology study of endangered Mexican spotted owls nesting in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos National Laboratory is being conducted in the Lab's Bioscience Division and has revealed valuable information about levels of genetic diversity present within the owl population.

Contact: Jonathan Longmire
jonlongmire@lanl.gov
505-667-8208
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Metabolite discovery allows for fast plant growth
A project that uses modern biotechnology to produce plants that grow faster, are more robust and contain more protein is ongoing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bioscience Division. The project stems from the discovery of a naturally occurring plant metabolite that allows plants to regulate their own nitrogen metabolism rates, resulting in plants that reach peak growth more rapidly because they fix more carbon dioxide.

Contact: Pat Unkefer
punkefer@lanl.gov
505-665-2554
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Building a better catalyst for bioremediation
There are only a few ways to handle toxic waste. Dump it, put it in a landfill, move it someplace else or change the contaminant into something less hazardous. Dealing with toxic waste is a major problem that is beginning to be addressed in an innovative way: using bacterial enzymes, catalytic proteins produced by living cells, to transform the waste.

Contact: Jim Brainard
jbrainard@lanl.gov
505-667-0150
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Microbial diversity
They have been called the foundation of the biosphere, invisible yet essential. And now researchers know bacteria are unimaginably abundant but just don 't know exactly who they are.

Contact: Cheryl Kuske
kuske@lanl.gov
505-665-4800
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 1001-1025 out of 1073 stories.
<< < 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

 

 

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