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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 1026-1050 out of 1073 stories.
<< < 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

1-Jun-2001
Using pathogen sequence data
As scientists delve into the vast quantity of biological data currently being produced, the problems of handling such a treasure trove of information are daunting. New tools and techniques for managing, storing, analyzing, mining and visualizing this information are the focus of much attention in the scientific community, especially when the data can have a bearing on public health and even emergency response.

Contact: Paul Jackson
glm@lanl.gov
505-665-7985
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unraveling anthrax
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bioscience Division researchers have developed technologies that can uniquely identify the origins of biological organisms based on information in the DNA.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Rapid Syndrome Validation Project
Los Alamos National Laboratory is collaborating on a new tool that will provide public health officials with an early warning and response system for threats to public health.

Contact: Sandra Zink
zink@lanl.gov
505-667-5260
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Optical biopsy studied as breast cancer treatment aid
Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women aged 40-59 and was expected to total more than 45,000 deaths in the United States last year, according to the American Cancer Society. A Los Alamos National Laboratory-developed technology, the Optical Biopsy System (OBS), may aid in not only the diagnosis of breast cancer, but the success of the surgical treatment as well.

Contact: Judith Mourant
jmourant@lanl.gov
505-665-1190
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unmasking the mysteries of chronic beryllium disease
Beryllium is a unique lightweight metal used in nuclear weapons and, in the commercial sector, for telescope mirrors, golf clubs and a variety of other applications. While solid beryllium and beryllium alloys are safe, fine particulate beryllium is hazardous if inhaled.

Contact: Babetta Marrone
blm@lanl.gov
505-667-3279
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
'SNP'ing' away at human health issues
In the summer of 2000, scientists around the world cheered as the effort to unravel the mystery of the human genome reached a milestone—a completed draft of the human genome sequence. The sequence is a set of instructions that determines individual characteristics ranging from the cosmetic, such as hair and eye color, to the medically important, such as susceptibility to disease and response to treatments.

Contact: Scott White
scott_white@lanl.gov
505-665-3860
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Molecular machines and networking
We began the 20th century with very little knowledge of the molecules of life. For the first 50 years, researchers focused largely on trying to understand molecules' make up, wondering how molecules were able to do such mysterious things as pass on hereditary information.

Contact: Jill Trewhella
trewhella@lanl.gov
505-667-2690
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Bubble science benefits deep divers
Nitrogen, that colorless, odorless gas that makes up 80 percent of our air, is perfectly harmless as it's breathed in and out on land, but for underwater divers, it's the enemy.

Contact: Bruce Wienke
brw@lanl.gov
505-667-1358
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The chemistry of life's building blocks
Life’s molecules are made up from chemical building blocks that can be synthesized in a laboratory. The ability to synthesize these molecular components is extremely important in the quest for understanding the structures and functions of the biological macromolecules, DNA, RNA and proteins.

Contact: Ryszard Michalczyk
michalczyk@lanl.gov
505-667-7918
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Shaping the future
Proteins are the biological workhorses that make life possible. They provide structure, synthesize complicated chemicals, control the ability to move, help transmit neural impulses and perform countless other biological demands. Their ability to function properly is intimately tied to their structure—a complex arrangement of twists, loops, spirals and folds. Understanding this molecular origami is crucial in developing a fundamental understanding of molecular biology, designing disease-fighting drugs and repairing malfunctioning proteins.

Contact: Tom Terwilliger
terwilliger@lanl.gov
505-667-0072
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Genes to proteins
As researchers around the world completed sequencing the human genome, scientists and researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are setting their sights on a next logical step: understanding the function and complex interactions of the products of these genomes.

Contact: Norman Doggett
doggett@lanl.gov
505-665-4007
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The past and future of the human genome project
Los Alamos National Laboratory has a major role in the U.S. Human Genome Project, a joint Department of Energy/National Institutes of Health effort to identify all the genes in human DNA and determine the sequences of the chemical base pairs comprising the genome.

Contact: Larry Deaven
ldeaven@lanl.gov
505-667-3114
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-May-2001
MIC researchers escape gravity
Three researchers from IPRT's Microanalytical Instrumentation Center recently flew on NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft to test a new system for determining levels of treatment chemicals in water. It's part of an effort to develop novel instrumentation for monitoring the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-May-2001
Solving a 'boring' problem
Scientists and engineers at the INEEL and the University of Arkansas have developed two technologies that may ultimately enable safer and more economical oil and gas deep-ocean exploration.

Contact: David Weinberg
weinbe@inel.gov
208-526-4274
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

24-Apr-2001
New technology could spur growth in photovoltaic panels
Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have surpassed two records in solar cell design, paving the way toward reducing the cost of photovoltaics systems that produce electricity directly from sunlight.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Apr-2001
Lab-built components bound for outerspace
Jerry Hand and Jim Safly, two Ames Laboratory machinists , have been busy fabricating components for equipment designed to test and monitor the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Apr-2001
The oldest, farthest type Ia supernova was a lucky catch
Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Peter Nugent, working with Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute, used an IBM SP supercomputer at NERSC to analyze data from an exploding star that had been caught once on purpose and twice by accident by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Mar-2001
Science fiction becomes science reality
Who dreams up James Bond's toys? 007 and his gadgets may be a creation of Ian Fleming and Hollywood but those imaginative fellows do exist. A few of them work in INEEL's National Security Division. And there is a government organization that sponsors some of their projects - the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Contact: Mike Occhionero
occhmp@inel.gov
208-526-1535
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

1-Feb-2001
Separation technology unites lab, new company
One of Ed Yeung's latest developments — multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection — is an innovation that marks the first time that Yeung has been directly involved in launching a new company based on his technology.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2001
Ames Lab scientists win Energy 100 Awards
Ames Laboratory research was recognized on the Energy 100 Awards list. Number 24 on the top-100 list was photonic bandgap structures, which was one of only three discoveries and innovations recognized in 1990. Lead-free solder was 36th on the list; one of only two research projects recognized in 1994. Magnetic refrigeration made the 59th spot on the list and was one of 10 discoveries and innovations recognized in 1997.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Russian weapons knowledge put to peaceful work
Scientists in the Russian Federation who spent years researching and building biological weapons are now applying their knowledge to develop a promising cleanup solution for sites polluted with oil.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Minding mines—new landmine detection device developed
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are building a portable system to detect landmines that is especially useful in locating those most difficult to spot—landmines that contain little or no metal.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Energy-efficiency projects receive federal awards
Two of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's energy efficiency projects—one focused on military family housing and one on the Laboratory's own office buildings—earned prestigious awards from DOE and the Federal Interagency Policy Committee.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Ukraine project earns international recognition
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory received the International Energy Project of the Year Award 2000 in recognition of its efforts to promote energy efficiency at the Gostomel glass plant in Ukraine and reduce its reliance on power generated at Chornobyl reactors. Since 1996, Pacific Northwest and its partners, the Ukranian Energy Efficiency Center and Industrial Real Estate, have worked with Gostomel to develop a comprehensive energy-efficiency program and attract financing for implementation.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Laboratory receives third 'Outstanding' rating
For the third consecutive year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office awarded Battelle the highest possible rating for its operation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 1026-1050 out of 1073 stories.
<< < 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

 

 

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