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Features Archive

Showing stories 1051-1066 out of 1066 stories.
<< < 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43

1-Jan-2001
Making the most of metal oxides on the nanoscale
On first blush, two scientists striving to exploit unique electronic and magnetic properties of metal oxides that occur in the nanoscale may seem to be working toward the same end. They're using the same equipment and some of the same methods, but their research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its potential applications are quite different.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Nanotechnology moves into the spotlight
It's science on the smallest of levels. It's the truth in the statement that good things come in small packages. Nanotechnology is an area of research and development that centers on phenomena that occur at dimensions so tiny that they're hard to imagine—in the range of one billionth of a meter. Yet the potential impacts are tremendous.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Big possibilities from tiny technologies
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and around the world are exploring nanoscience and nanotechnologies, where dimensions are in the range of one billionth of a meter. Bill Rogers manages Pacific Northwest's Nanoscience and Technology Initiative and was recently appointed the associate laboratory director for the Environmental and Health Science Division, which he renamed the Fundamental Science Division.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
A click away from new technologies
Looking to bring a new technology to the market or to form commercial partnerships around a new technology? Check out Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's updated list of technologies available for licensing or commercialization at .

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Going deep for research
Pacific Northwest's scientific dive team collects valuable information about the marine environment that simply is not available in any other way. For example, they use underwater videography and hydroacoustics to study fish behavior and conduct population assessments.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Systems biology
ORNL scientists are conducting research in functional genomics—the study of genomes to determine the biological function of all the genes and their products—and proteomics—the study of the full set of proteins encoded by a genome.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2000
Random acts of brightness
Costas Soukoulis, an Ames Laboratory senior physicis and former Iowa State University graduate student Xunya Jiang, now working at DiCon Fiberoptics, Inc., near Berkeley, Calif., have developed a theoretical model that simulates the phenomenon of random lasing, in which photons that follow random paths create a multiple-light-scattering laser.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2000
The stuff that came in from the cold
Despite the best efforts of particle physicists and astrophysicists, most of the Universe is still missing. We know where it is, but we don't know what it is. It is all around us, but we can only see it by looking far, far away. That is the challenge for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS).

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Form follows sequence
Powerful new computational tools, such as those available at nersc, are playing a key role in deciphering the molecular dynamics of proteins, including creating "movies" of proteins in motion.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Circuits of a cell
Scientists investigate the biochemical "circuitry" of cells.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@obo.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Picturing proteins
Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques are making it possible for scientists to create 3-D images of protein complexes that are unsuitable for x-ray crystallography.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
The crystal robot
Innovative robotics designed and built by Lab researchers will grow protein crystals for experimentation at a rate once only dreamed of.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
The machinery of life
Scientists are using Berkeley Lab's state-of-the-art imaging resources to gain new insight into the structure and function of proteins, including those involved in cystic fibrosis.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Seeing the cell nucleus in 3-D
A new microscopic program called daVinci is helping researchers better understand how breast cancer develops.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Evaluating vehicle emissions controls
ORNL researchers are developing software tools for supercomputers that will simulate engine exhaust from various lean-burn diesel and gasoline engines as it flows through envisioned catalytic converters designed to chemically transform pollutants into harmless emissions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Polymers plus quasicrystals — A puzzling interaction
Sometimes trying something that really shouldn't work can lead to an amazing discovery. That's what happened to Valerie Sheares, an Ames Laboratory associate and Iowa State University assistant professor of chemistry. The discovery, a polymer-quasicrystal composite, has the best characteristics of each of the constituent parts. It's opened the door for a variety of innovative uses. Why it works, however, remains a puzzle—one that Sheares is eager to solve.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing stories 1051-1066 out of 1066 stories.
<< < 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43

 

 

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