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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 204 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


12-Feb-2015
Three young scientists will conduct research at Jefferson Lab
Outstanding academic accomplishments have earned three young scientists funds to conduct part of their thesis research at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Va.

Contact: Deb Magaldi
magaldi@jlab.org
Doe-Anderson

12-Feb-2015
Yonath discusses visualizing ribosomes and antibiotic resistance
Ada Yonath, a pioneer in using crystallographic techniques to visualize ribosome structure, was the most recent Eugene P. Wigner Distinguished Lecturer at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Her work continues to contribute to ribosomal research, prompting researchers to look more closely at antibiotics that target bacterial ribosomes, including those of pathogenic bacteria species, an avenue that could help reverse current levels of antibiotic resistance. At the talk, she steered conversation to species-specific antibiotic resistance.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Feb-2015
Smashing polarized protons to uncover spin and other secrets
If you want to unravel the secrets of proton spin, put a 'twist' in your colliding proton beams. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is the only facility in the world with the ability to collide such spin-polarized protons. The latest round of these collisions has just begun and will continue for approximately the next nine weeks.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
Doe-Anderson

9-Feb-2015
SLAC hosts 11th annual Regional DOE Science Bowl
The Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory welcomed 20 high school teams from five San Francisco Bay Area counties to the 2015 Regional DOE Science Bowl on Feb. 7. It was the 11th time the lab hosted the annual event.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Feb-2015
National Academy of Engineering elects SUNCAT director Jens N°rskov
Jens N°rskov, director of the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis at Stanford and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has been named a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Feb-2015
Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates the world's brightest Synchrotron Light Source
US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the world's most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The NSLS-II is a $912-million DOE Office of Science User Facility that produces extremely bright beams of x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light used to examine a wide range of materials, including superconductors and catalysts, geological samples, and biological proteins to accelerate advances in energy, environmental science, and medicine.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

4-Feb-2015
Record keeping helps bacteria's immune system fight invaders
Bacteria have a sophisticated means of defending themselves, and they need it: more viruses infect bacteria than any other biological entity. Two experiments undertaken at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provide new insight at the heart of bacterial adaptive defenses in a system called CRISPR, short for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Feb-2015
Five ways to put tiny targets in front of an X-ray laser
X-ray devices have long been used to see the inner structure of things, from bone breaks in the human body to the contents of luggage at airport security checkpoints. But to see life's chemistry and exotic materials at the scale of individual atoms, you need a far more powerful X-ray device. Enter the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Feb-2015
The quest for efficiency in thermoelectric nanowires
Research detailed in a thermoelectric nanowire paper published by Sandia National Laboratories represents the first time researchers managed to control crystal orientation, crystal size and alloy uniformity by a single process. All three factors contribute to better thermoelectric performance.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

28-Jan-2015
X-ray study reveals division of labor in cell health protein
Researchers working in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered that a key protein for cell health, which has recently been linked to diabetes, cancer and other diseases, can multitask by having two identical protein parts divide labor.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Jan-2015
SLAC welcomes professor and Chemical Sciences Division director Tony Heinz
Tony Heinz, a scientist known for exploring the properties of nanoscale materials and developing important new tools for that exploration, has joined the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as a professor of photon science and Stanford University as a professor of applied physics. He will also lead the SLAC Chemical Sciences Division.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Jan-2015
SLAC scientists search for new ways to deal with US uranium ore processing legacy
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are trying to find out why uranium persists in groundwater at former uranium ore processing sites despite remediation of contaminated surface materials two decades ago. They think buried organic material may be at fault, storing toxic uranium at levels that continue to pose risks to human health and the environment, and hope their study will pave the way for better long-term site management and protection of the public and environment.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Jan-2015
Pinpointing the magnetic moments of nuclear matter
Using supercomputing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Berkeley Lab, a team of nuclear physicists has demonstrated for the first time the ability of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) -- a fundamental theory in particle physics -- to calculate the magnetic structure of some of the lightest nuclei. Their findings are part of an ongoing effort to further our understanding of the universe.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

16-Jan-2015
SLAC's Peter Rowson named American Physical Society fellow
SLAC staff physicist Peter Rowson has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society, the largest physics association in the world. APS confers this distinction on a small percentage of the society's membership; it is especially significant because it is a peer-nominated honor.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Jan-2015
RHIC physics feeds future high-tech workforce: Ágnes Mócsy
┴gnes Mˇcsy, a theoretical physicist and tenured associate professor at Pratt Institute, one of the world's prestigious art and design universities, hopes to convey the sense of awe she experienced seeing Brookhaven Lab's particle collider to the art students she teaches in physics and astronomy classes for non-physics majors.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

12-Jan-2015
Water, water, everywhere -- Controlling the properties of nanomaterials
Properties of water molecules on the surface of metal oxides can be used to better control these minerals and use them to make products such as more efficient semiconductors for organic light emitting diodes and solar cells, safer vehicle glass in fog and frost, and more environmentally friendly chemical sensors for industrial applications.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

7-Jan-2015
'Seeing' hydrogen atoms to unveil enzyme catalysis
A multi-institutional research team led by Chris Dealwis from Case Western Reserve University has used the new IMAGINE instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor to map an enzyme that could play an important role in anti-cancer drug development.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jan-2015
2014's top-10 scientific achievements at Brookhaven Lab
From new insights into the building blocks of matter to advances in understanding batteries, superconductors, and a protein that could help fight cancer, 2014 was a year of stunning successes for the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Dec-2014
MSL's Radiochemistry Annex: It's getting hot in there
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Washington State University and Savannah River National Laboratory are among the principal investigators seeking innovative solutions to environmental and energy production challenges in subsurface science. They are also among the scientists who submitted applications to the Special Science Call for Proposals to use EMSL's Radiochemical Annex. Learn more about three research projects using the Annex's resources.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

19-Dec-2014
First direct evidence that a phase of matter competes with high-temperature superconductivity
Scientists have found the first direct evidence that a mysterious phase of matter known as the 'pseudogap' competes with high-temperature superconductivity, robbing it of electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Dec-2014
Crown ethers flatten in graphene for strong, specific binding
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has discovered a way to dramatically increase the selectivity and binding strength of crown ethers by incorporating them within a rigid framework of graphene. Strong, specific electrostatic binding of crown ethers may advance sensors, chemical separations, nuclear-waste cleanup, extraction of metals from ores, purification and recycling of rare-earth elements, water purification, biotechnology, energy production in durable lithium-ion batteries, catalysis, medicine and data storage.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

16-Dec-2014
A standard for neuroscience data
In November, Neurodata without Borders hosted a hackathon to consolidate ideas for designing and implementing a standard neuroscience file format. And BrainFormat, a neuroscience data standardization framework developed at Berkeley Lab, was one of several candidates selected for further investigation. It is now a strong contender to contribute to the development of a community-wide data format and storage standard for the neuroscience research community.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

15-Dec-2014
Is the Higgs Boson a piece of the matter-antimatter puzzle?
Several experiments, including the BaBar experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, have helped explain some -- but not all -- of the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe. Now a SLAC theorist and his colleagues have laid out a possible method for determining if the Higgs boson is involved.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Dec-2014
DESY's Henry Chapman awarded Leibniz Prize for X-ray laser research
Henry Chapman, a scientist at Germany's DESY lab who participated in pioneering studies at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, has been awarded the Leibniz Prize. The 2.5 million euro ($3.1 million) scientific award is bestowed by a German research foundation. LCLS is a Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Dec-2014
Studies look at long-term aging of electronics in nuclear weapons
Researchers have studied radiation effects since the early days of nuclear weapons. But a 30-year program Sandia National Laboratories began in 2006 will provide real-time data for the first time on how electronics age within a weapon.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Showing stories 26-50 out of 204 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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