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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 257 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


30-Apr-2015
New path to loss-free electricity
Electric current flows without any resistance in a superconducting state thanks to a surprising redistribution of bonding electrons and the associated electronic and atomic behavior after substitution of some cobalt atoms for iron in barium iron arsenide.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

30-Apr-2015
Microbe produces ethanol from switchgrass without pretreatment
Scientists engineered a strain of a consolidated bioprocessing bacterium that efficiently breaks down biomass to produce ethanol without pretreatment.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

30-Apr-2015
Microbes disprove long-held assumption that all organisms share a common vocabulary
Some wild microorganisms reinterpret the instructions coded into their DNA. Short DNA segments that signal other organisms to stop are instead read as instructions to keep building.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

30-Apr-2015
Model captures how nitrogen limitation affects hydrological processes
Rising atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide act as a fertilizer for plants, speeding their growth and altering how they use water and interact with the climate. However, an insufficient supply of nitrogen can limit the rapid growth caused by increased carbon dioxide. Researchers adapted the Community Land Model to represent how nitrogen limitation affects plant growth.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

29-Apr-2015
Special science call projects announced
EMSL's Special Science Call for Proposals ran from mid-April through September and generated 23 accepted studies. The call challenged prospective users to submit high-impact research projects that took advantage of EMSL's technical resources including RadEMSL, the Quiet Wing microscopy and NanoSIMS capabilities, and HRMAC. The research associated with the call is progressing, and the projects will soon start delivering important scientific findings.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

29-Apr-2015
SIMES researchers elected to National Academy of Sciences
Materials scientists and professors at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Zhi-Xun Shen, Shoucheng Zhang and Aharon Kapitulnik were elected to the National Academy of Sciences. All three researchers are principal investigators at the joint SLAC and Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Apr-2015
Connecting 3 atomic layers puts semiconducting science on its edge
Scientists created a new semiconducting material -- only three atomic layers thick -- that exhibits electronic properties beyond traditional semiconductors. Two nano-engineered configurations of the material have shown an enhanced response to light.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

28-Apr-2015
Ground control
The United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 the International Year of Soils. Soil is critical for food production and climate regulation. It's a complex underground ecosystem of organisms that process decaying debris to enrich the land as well as store and release carbon into the atmosphere. However, human activity and changing climate are impacting this environmental system. Scientists working at EMSL are trying to understand the complexities of soil to develop better sustainable land management to protect it.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

28-Apr-2015
Direct visualization of magnetoelectric domains
A novel microscopy technique called magnetoelectric force microscopy was developed to detect the local cross-coupling between magnetic and electric dipoles. Combined experimental observation and theoretical modeling provide understanding on how a bulk linear magnetoelectric effect can be realized in a new family of materials.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

28-Apr-2015
STAR heavy flavor tracker detects signs of charm at RHIC
Nuclear physicists at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider can now detect rare, elusive heavy quark particles using the Heavy Flavor Tracker, a new component installed as part of the STAR experiment.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

27-Apr-2015
Unexpected success
While experimenting with a heat treatment process he modified by eliminating a couple of steps, Klett made a discovery that caused quite a stir and prompted hundreds of inquiries from scientists, academia and industry.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Apr-2015
Sticky fingers
Researcher applies materials science techniques to the field of forensics, and some of her research has helped crime scene investigators rebuild fingerprints after they have faded over time.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Apr-2015
NSF students gain hands-on experience in neutron sciences at ORNL
A group of 13 Ph.D. students from three partnering universities gathered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in April for an intensive course in how to apply neutron scattering to their studies of materials science and biological systems with hands-on use of instruments at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Apr-2015
Insulator-to-metal transition of vanadium dioxide
When heated to just above room temperature, the electrical conductivity of vanadium dioxide abruptly increases by a factor of 10,000. Experiments and high-performance computation reveal how the unusually large lattice vibrations stabilize this highly conductive metallic phase.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

24-Apr-2015
Spontaneous formation of biomimetic, nanoporous membrane channels
For the first time, spontaneous insertion of carbon nanotubes into natural as well as synthetic cell membranes to form pores that mimic biological channels has been demonstrated.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

23-Apr-2015
Optimizing atomic neighborhoods for speedier chemical reactions
Scientists have discovered that for palladium-nickel catalysts, certain surface characteristics, measured at the atomic level, sped the creation of carbon dioxide from carbon monoxide. This type of atomic detail has not been available by traditional studies and can aid the cycle of catalyst design by optimizing for structural parameters at the nearest neighbor level of an atomic environment.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

22-Apr-2015
ICARUS neutrino experiment to move to Fermilab
A group of scientists led by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia will transport the world's largest liquid-argon neutrino detector across the Atlantic Ocean to its new home at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Apr-2015
Multimetal nanoframes improve catalyst performance
Researchers synthesized a highly active and durable class of electrocatalysts by exploiting the structural evolution of solid Pt-Ni bimetallic nanocrystals into porous cage-like structures or nanoframes. This approach to synthesizing the material is a significant advance towards realizing electrocatalysts with superior catalytic properties and lower cost.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

20-Apr-2015
SLAC and Stanford's James D. Bjorken receives 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize
James D. Bjorken, a theoretical physicist and professor emeritus at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and at Stanford University, has been awarded the 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize of the European Physical Society. Along with four other scientists, he was honored for theoretical work that revolutionized our understanding of the internal structure of the proton.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2015
A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity
An international team led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory discovered a potential Rosetta Stone of high-temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

15-Apr-2015
Electrolyte genome could be battery game-changer
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Kristin Persson says she can take some of the guesswork out of the electrolyte discovery process with her Electrolyte Genome.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-Apr-2015
Researchers create a new map of invisible dark matter
Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, including researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of the cosmos. These maps, created with one of the world's most powerful digital cameras, are the largest contiguous maps created at this level of detail, and will improve our understanding of dark matter's role in the formation of galaxies.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Apr-2015
Long-sought magnetic mechanism observed in exotic hybrid materials
Scientists have measured the subatomic intricacies of an exotic phenomenon first predicted more than 60 years ago. This so-called van Vleck magnetism is the key to harnessing the quantum quirks of topological insulators -- hybrid materials that are both conducting and insulating -- and could lead to unprecedented electronics.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

10-Apr-2015
Bacteria tracked feeding nitrogen to nutrient-starved plants
An international team of researchers, including three from Brookhaven National Laboratory, tracked nitrogen as soil bacteria pulled it from the air and released it as plant-friendly ammonium. This eco-friendly process -- called biological nitrogen fixation -- substantially promoted growth in certain grass crops.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

7-Apr-2015
First endowed professorship to link SLAC and Stanford honors Arthur Bienenstock
Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have established the first endowed professorship that is reserved specifically for joint appointments between the two.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 257 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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