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Features Archive

Showing stories 301-325 out of 1040 stories.
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12-Oct-2005
Virginia Tech wins architecture, dwelling contests at Solar Decathlon
Virginia Tech has taken an early lead in the Solar Decathlon, now underway on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., by winning Architecture and Dwelling, the first two of 10 contests in the competition.

Contact: Aaron Bernstein
202-715-1543
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

12-Oct-2005
Super-fast super-sensitive detectors
Only detectors with the greatest precision capabilities will measure up to the machine seeking to explore supersymmetry, dark matter, the Higgs mechanism, and new physics that hasn't yet been imagined. Their shapes and configurations might be familiar, but their inner workings–the materials and electronics charged with creating views of new physics–will carry a symbolic branding: "Product of the 21st century."

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

16-Sep-2005
Less is more: No-till agriculture helps mitigate global warming
Using research, technology and tractors, farmers around the world are plotting and carrying out a small revolution-a revolution that has the potential to transform agriculture and use it as a tool to mitigate global warming.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Practical climate financing — Using markets to drive cleaner energy production
Every day, people in China get sick just from breathing the air. Many die prematurely. In economic terms, pollution costs China eight to ten percent of gross domestic product in lost productivity, according to World Bank estimates. Air pollution accounts for three-quarters of that productivity loss.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Expecting the unexpected
Discovering unexpected impacts from climate change is something researcher Ruby Leung is getting used to.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Going where no facility has gone before
A data acquisition system is being sent to Niger next year to collect climate information in this data-sparse region as part of a new user facility established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, ARM.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Clouds help clear up global warming questions
Is Earth's climate really changing? Climate researchers have answered this question with a resounding "Yes!" It is widely accepted that Earth's temperature will rise two to three degrees Celsius over the next 50 years if current fossil fuel emissions continue to grow at their present rate. The next question is how this warming trend will affect the climate--particularly water resources.

Contact: Media Relations
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Putting it all together—people, technology, economics—and climate
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's climate research program was created in 1989 in response to a Presidential Initiative called the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The climate research group was formed in two places, with the Richland, Wash., group focusing on physical climate research and the Washington, D.C., group focusing on technology.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
The search for methane in Earth's mantle
Petroleum geologists have long searched beneath Earth's surface for oil and gas, knowing that hydrocarbons form from the decomposition of plants and animals buried over time.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
A random walk through time and space
IN 1905, Albert Einstein published five papers that shook the world of physics. His elegant arguments and conclusions were marvels of physical intuition that addressed dilemmas raised by experimental evidence.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
A winning couple
Brian and Vicky D'Urso are the first married couple to come to ORNL as Wigner Fellows. Neither was recruited by the Laboratory. As simple as it sounds, the graduates of the California Institute of Technology found information about ORNL and the Wigner Fellowship program on the Internet.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
The critical difference
The ORNL Review asked two important questions of some current and former Wigner Fellows. The questions were: "What do you think of the Wigner Fellowship program?" and "What is your impression of ORNL as a place to do research?" The answers are revealing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-326-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
In their hands: The future of particle physics
Particle physics is at a critical time, and its future depends on how well scientists can make their case to a diverse National Academy of Sciences panel.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
The compact linear collider
As the Global Design Effort for the proposed International Linear Collider starts to take shape, an international collaboration of scientists simultaneously works on an alternative linear collider technology that pushes physics and engineering to the edge.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

21-Jul-2005
The grand challenge of thermonuclear ignition
Scientists often refer to formidable scientific and technological hurdles with far-reaching consequences as grand challenges. One of the enduring grand challenges is achieving nuclear fusion--the power source of the Sun and stars and the physical process at the core of Livermore's national security mission--in a laboratory environment.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

10-Jul-2005
Still making a mark
One is A. Baha Balantekin, who came to Oak Ridge as a Wigner Fellow in 1984-86 and now, somewhat ironically, holds the Wigner Chair at the University of Wisconsin, where the Nobel Laureate Eugene P. Wigner was once a professor.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Jul-2005
Filling the talent pipeline
As head of Ph.D. recruiting at ORNL in 1975, Dan Robbins had a message for Herman Postma, the new ORNL director. Robbins, Chuck Coutant, and other Laboratory scientists had been visiting outstanding research universities to interview the most impressive graduate students in science and engineering. Their challenge was an inability to offer jobs to the most promising students.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Office of Science Director Orbach outlines bright future for SLAC
Raymond Orbach, director of the Office of Science at the Department of Energy, lavished praise on SLAC's past accomplishments and promising future during a special address Thursday on the Lab's Green.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Future space scientists in training at BNL's NSRL
How does deep-space radiation affect the brain? The heart? What is the danger of developing cancer during long space voyages -- and how can we best shield against it?

Contact: Bulletin Editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Pushing the boundaries of high-temperature superconductors
A collaboration led by scientists at BNL has revealed a new mechanism that explains why adding calcium to a high-temperature superconductor increases its current-carrying capacity.

Contact: Bulletin Editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-May-2005
Russian government honors PNNL staff for 10 years of service
Ten-year nuclear safety program wraps up with many improvements in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

Contact: Kathy Bryson
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 301-325 out of 1040 stories.
<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

 

 

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