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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 301-325 out of 1078 stories.
<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

25-Jul-2006
Using instrumentation built in collaboration with JLab
College of William & Mary (CWM) scientists have found that an equivalent dose of potassium iodide five times higher than the FDA-recommended dose for humans, in the event of a nuclear accident, is needed to protect small animals effectively from radioactive iodide in medical imaging procedures. This study was performed as part of a long-term animal nuclear imaging project conducted by of biology, physics and applied science researchers from CWM and Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Pocket-sized physics detector does big science
How do quarks and gluons, the elementary constituents of all matter, combine to form the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom? This is a fundamental unsolved question in nuclear physics that researchers at Jefferson Lab are working to answer. The internal structure of the proton has been studied for several decades, and scientists have learned a great deal. However, much less is known about the structure of the neutron.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Spin structures of protons and neutrons
Just as a top spins on a table, the tiny quarks inside protons and neutrons also spin. Now a complex calculation by theoretical nuclear physicists at Jefferson Lab has revealed that a quark's spin may be altered by the surroundings of the proton or neutron in which it resides. This surprising result, recently published in the journal, Physical Review Letters, may lead to new insights about how ordinary matter is constructed.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
On the leading edge
The Accelerator Division's Institute for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Science & Technology is a world leader in SRF accelerator technology research and design. Now the newest idea out of the Institute may revolutionize the way accelerating cavities are produced -- making the manufacturing process faster and cheaper, while producing cavities that could potentially outperform any other niobium cavities ever tested.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Big Bite does its stuff
Jefferson Lab's core mission is to study the heart of ordinary matter: the nucleus of the atom. Now Hall A has a new magnet and detector system designed to help physicists look at the nucleus in a whole new light. "BigBite" has debuted in its first experiment at Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Detector Group builds imaging device for German Research Center
Jefferson Lab Detector Group members traveled to Heidelberg, Germany, to assemble and bring on-line a small-animal imaging device the group developed and built for the German Cancer Research Center. Work on the project began in June 2004. The device is similar other small animal imaging gamma cameras developed by the Detector Group; however, this imager design is based on a new concept developed by Vladimir Popov which resulted in highly improved detector performance.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2006
Unique partnership brings new cancer treatment to life
IsoRay is a company that started as a good idea and, in less than a decade, has grown into a publicly traded corporation. "IsoRay literally started in Lane Bray's basement, with about three employees," said Larry Greenwood, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory technical lead for the IsoRay project.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Jul-2006
PNNL is strong asset for Research District
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has led a team of community partners in using a grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration to hire AngelouEconomics to develop marketing and land-use plans for the 1,600 acres of property in north Richland known as the Research District.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Jul-2006
G-Zero update
In research performed in Hall C, nuclear physicists have found that strange quarks do contribute to the structure of the proton. This result indicates that, just as previous experiments have hinted, strange quarks in the proton's quark-gluon sea contribute to a proton's properties. The result comes from work performed by the G-Zero collaboration, an international group of 108 physicists from 19 institutions, and was presented at a Jefferson Lab physics seminar on June 17.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-2689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Jun-2006
Technology demonstration thwarts fictitious terrorist attack
The pace was intense as data flowed in from sources across the world -- a spike in radiation from a ground-based indicator in Pakistan, an unexplained outbreak of plague in India, and a disturbing convergence of travel plans among suspected terrorists. Information Analysis Center analysts agreed the evidence indicated a well planned terrorist attack was imminent in downtown Seattle. Local law enforcement was quickly dispatched, capturing the suspected terrorists as they attempted to smuggle a chemical and radiation dispersing bomb into the city.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Lightweight materials pave the road for energy-efficient vehicles
In efforts to shorten the long road to fuel efficiency, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to develop cost-effective, high-strength, lightweight materials that will reduce vehicle weight without compromising cost, performance or safety.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Catalysis: The science behind sustainable energy
About 60 percent of the things we wear or use are produced by processes that depend on catalysis. Catalysts are substances that modify chemical reaction rates and remain unchanged afterward. Catalyst technologies affect nearly all areas of the chemical and petroleum industries with an economic impact estimated at more than $10 trillion per year worldwide. Now more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are in demand for new energy production processes to ease the United States' dependence on imported resources.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Fish-friendly solutions
Although turbines have generated power at hydroelectric dams for many years, not much is known about how water flowing through the turbines may harm fish. In efforts to design more "fish-friendly" turbines, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted laboratory experiments to examine the relationship between water velocities within the turbine chambers and injuries to fish.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Jun-2006
"Smart" energy devices + real-time pricing = increased options for consumers
About 200 volunteers in the Pacific Northwest are testing equipment that is expected to make the power grid more reliable while offsetting huge investments in new transmission and distribution equipment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently launched the Pacific Northwest GridWiseTM Testbed Demonstration, a regional initiative to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-375-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Jun-2006
WSU and PNNL break ground on new facility
Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory broke ground April 13, 2006, on the Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory. The BSEL is a $24-million joint effort between WSU and PNNL. Located on the WSU Tri-Cities campus, researchers will use the laboratory to develop processes for converting low-value agricultural byproducts and residues into value-added chemicals for products like plastics, solvents, fibers, pharmaceuticals and fuel additives.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Managing the Soviet legacy
An intact nuclear weapon is stolen and detonated. A terrorist group somehow steals, purchases, or produces fissile material and fabricates a crude bomb, called an improvised nuclear device, which the group threatens to detonate if its demands are not met.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Science for security
Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, national security has become a priority mission of the Department of Energy. This mission, which in addition to public safety focuses on the protection of America's economic and energy security assets, is supported by an increasingly robust program of technological innovation.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

28-Mar-2006
PPPL developes internet-based simulation capabilities
Physicists at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are developing internet-based interfaces which will allow researchers to access powerful simulation tools used to interpret experimental data and predict plasma behavior in future experiments.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

7-Mar-2006
Research shows ventilated auto seats improve fuel economy, comfort
The US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has demonstrated that ventilated automotive seats not only can improve passenger comfort but also a vehicle's fuel economy. That's because ventilated seats keep drivers and passengers cooler, so they need less air conditioning to be comfortable.

Contact: George Douglas
george_douglas@nrel.gov
303-275-4096
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

13-Feb-2006
Brookhaven scientists aid in homeland security field study
If an industrial accident or a terrorist act released dangerous contaminants into the atmosphere in New York City, the city's first responders would have to decide quickly whether people should shelter in place or be evacuated, and what evacuation routes should be considered. In the future they will be aided in making those decisions by information gathered during the New York City Urban Dispersion Program field studies, conducted in the city's urban canyons in March and August of 2005.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

13-Feb-2006
Mimicking nature's crystalline structures
Scientists and engineers have long envied nature's ability to design crystalline structures whose properties are often superior to those of similar synthetic materials. Through a process called biomineralization, proteins orchestrate the growth processes of many natural minerals into designs that confer exceptional properties.

Contact: Jim De Yoreo
deyoreo1@llnl.gov
925-423-4240
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

26-Jan-2006
NOvA: A neutrino appearance experiment
Deep in the woods of Minnesota, close to the Canadian border, particle physicists hope to construct the next neutrino experiment on a secluded piece of land, fit for studying a lightweight particle that was, itself, once ignored.

Contact: Kendra Snyder
630-840-5681
DOE/Ames Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

6-Jan-2006
The search for extra dimensions
Although we now think of the universe as three bulky, nearly-flat dimensions, we might soon discover that the fabric of space-time consists of many more dimensions than we ever dreamed.

Contact: Kelen Tuttle
650-926-2585
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

27-Dec-2005
Spallation Neutron Source amazing science facts
The New Year is bringing the science community a grand present: The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On schedule for completion in 2006, the Department of Energy's new science facility will provide researchers with the world's most powerful and most advanced tool for analyzing a host of materials with neutrons.

Contact: Bill Cabage
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 301-325 out of 1078 stories.
<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

 

 

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