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Features Archive

Showing stories 701-725 out of 1087 stories.
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20-Sep-2002
FYI
If you've ever tried to speak with a member of the military, you know that comprehension is nearly impossible unless you're familiar with its language. You probably also know that its language of acronyms sometimes seems...well, pointless. They don't have cars, they have POVs--Privately Owned Vehicles.

Contact: Pam Zerbinos
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Sep-2002
New neutrino experiment at Fermilab goes live
Scientists of the Booster Neutrino Experiment collaboration announced on September 9 that a new detector at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has observed its first neutrino events.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Sep-2002
A thousand years of climate change
Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have just completed a 1,000-year run of a powerful new climate system model on a supercomputer at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

6-Sep-2002
$20 SPS membership brings married undergraduate students to Jefferson Lab for research experience
Russell's efforts in calibrating the UTEP/Orsay instrumented collimator allowed Hall B researchers to align the linearly polarized beam to within 50 microns. According to Phil Cole, this is quite an achievement and will increase the quality of data for the g8a run in Hall B. Juliette's time was spent working on the resolutions and count rates for exclusive p0 (pi zero) production. "I've been plotting the resolutions from single-arm phase space simulations."

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Sep-2002
At Los Alamos, prior planning facilitated quick 9/11 response
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory didnÕt start thinking about the issue of counter-terrorism on September 12, 2001. ÒThe three National Nuclear Security Administration laboratories have been involved for decades in technology development and problem solving in the realm of arms control and nonproliferation,Ó notes Associate Director for Threat Reduction Don Cobb.

Contact: William Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

3-Sep-2002
Los Alamos: Home to the world’s most powerful controlled-pulse magnet
Over the past 11 years in the world of magnets, The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has gone from being recognized for pulse megagauss explosives field work to being the world leader in pulsed-magnetic-field research and home to the world's most powerful controlled-pulse magnet.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

2-Sep-2002
Breakthrough mass spectrometry technology
A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed new instrumentation and a unique approach to obtain the most complete protein analysis of any organism to date. Results were published in the August 20, 2002, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Aug-2002
OSTP's Marburger visits Fermilab
I am personally excited about particle physics," John Marburger, the Bush Administration's director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, told a Fermilab audience earlier this month. Furthermore, he said, now is a great time to be a particle physicist.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Aug-2002
Interactions - Communicating particle physics in the 21st century
Physics is in crisis. We have lost our ideals and focus as a unified field. The reasons for this loss can be traced to recent history as well as to pressures currently felt within the physics community. Particle physics used to be the dominant area and had pride-of-place in our discipline. It was "basic" and "fundamental." It was exciting, with many great discoveries taking place and with a unified picture of the interactions emerging.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

26-Aug-2002
NREL 25th Anniversary
At the foot of a rocky mesa on the outskirts of Golden, Colo., a small cadre of scientists and engineers gathered on July 5, 1977 to launch DOE's Solar Energy Research Institute, a federal facility dedicated to harnessing power from the sun. They had high hopes and a pioneering spirit. This year, some of those same pioneers are celebrating the 25th anniversary of their ambitious endeavor, today known as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
303-275-4050
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

19-Aug-2002
Thirty years after power up
Thirty years ago this summer – in 1972 – the world's most powerful linear accelerator powered up for the first time. When it reached full energy, it generated pulses of 800-million-electron-volt protons at a repetition rate of up to 120 per second and an average current of 1 milliampere. It was the dawn of a new era in nuclear physics.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

14-Aug-2002
Scientific discovery through advanced computing
Fifty-one projects will receive a total of $57 million this fiscal year to develop the scientific computing software and hardware infrastructure needed to use terascale computers to advance fundamental research in several areas related to the department's missions, including climate modeling, fusion energy sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear astrophysics, high energy physics and high performance computing.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.Sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Aug-2002
Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers
President George W. Bush and his science advisor Jack Marburger honored 60 of the Nation's brightest researchers with the 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE, presented to the recipients in a ceremony at the White House on July 12, 2002, is the highest governmental honor received by outstanding scientists and engineers at the outset of their independent careers.

Contact: Cindy Musick
cindy.musick@science.doe.gov
202-586-0987
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Aug-2002
Energy-efficient supercomputers
Users of high-performance computers traditionally have focused on the cost of acquiring the big machines instead of the costs of maintenance, power and people. Not so with "Green Destiny."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

12-Aug-2002
Mission: Luminosity
The sign says it all about our mission for this critical time in the Beams Division and at Fermilab--we are focused on improving the performance of the Tevatron for Run II, almost to the exclusion of anything else. Lots of people have already told me how much they like it--an indication that people in the division and in the laboratory are committed to succeeding.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Aug-2002
Syracuse joins the search
The first chancellor of Syracuse University allowed his cow to graze on campus. But from those pastoral roots, the university has grown to be leader in the development of science and technology in New York state. In the 1980s, Syracuse launched one of the state's first Centers for Advanced Technology–the CASE Center--to revitalize local economic growth through technology. Last year, New York state was the second-largest sponsor, after the federal government, of research at the university.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

5-Aug-2002
A great warship fights on
The best of modern science may save the most glorious of historic wrecks-the 17th century warship Vasa. Using minimally destructive analytical techniques, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) worked with marine conservators from Sweden to discover what's eating the beautiful warship. The results were published in the February 21, 2002, issue of Nature.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Algorithms -- A new perspective on data
We live in the age of information. Analysts are among those inundated with data. But with the aid of powerful computing techniques, analysts can make sense of volumes of data that come in many forms--text, numbers, images, video, audio.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
The color of genomes
New visualization techniques developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory allow researchers to compare and analyze genomes using a powerful tool that computers cannot replace--the human brain.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Neither biological nor chemical agent… Keeping mail safe in the 21st century
Snail mail may be an anachronism, but enough people still use traditional mail to make it a convenient tool for terrorists using bio-weapons that can be lethal in small quantities. And mail is an international affair.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Responding to terrorism
Even before Sept. 11, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers were thinking of ways to combat terrorism. PNNL now contributes to the U.S. State Department's Diplomatic Security Service training program, teaching foreign firefighters, police and emergency medical personnel how to deal with weapons of mass destruction--chemical, biological and radiological--that may be used by terrorists. The training is offered to first responders in partner nations, generally in the capital, where the U.S. has an embassy or consulate.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Improving airline safety
In an ongoing project for NASA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory statisticians developed a system for analyzing flight data recorded aboard commercial aircraft.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
World-class equipment for a world-class lab
After nine years in development, a superconducting magnet, weighing 16 tons and standing 21 feet high, was delivered to PNNL in March. It is part of a 900 megahertz wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The NMR is a powerful scientific instrument that will enable scientists to make new discoveries in chemical, physical, biological and life sciences. When fully operational, it will be the world's largest, highest- performing NMR, enabling researchers to investigate larger and more complex molecules at resolutions never before available.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
PNNL applies risk assessment techniques to health care
Hospitals are for healing. With the help of tools used in the nuclear, aerospace and chemical industries, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are helping make sure they stay that way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 701-725 out of 1087 stories.
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