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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 726-750 out of 1101 stories.
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14-Aug-2002
Scientific discovery through advanced computing
Fifty-one projects will receive a total of $57 million this fiscal year to develop the scientific computing software and hardware infrastructure needed to use terascale computers to advance fundamental research in several areas related to the department's missions, including climate modeling, fusion energy sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear astrophysics, high energy physics and high performance computing.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.Sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Aug-2002
Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers
President George W. Bush and his science advisor Jack Marburger honored 60 of the Nation's brightest researchers with the 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE, presented to the recipients in a ceremony at the White House on July 12, 2002, is the highest governmental honor received by outstanding scientists and engineers at the outset of their independent careers.

Contact: Cindy Musick
cindy.musick@science.doe.gov
202-586-0987
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Aug-2002
Energy-efficient supercomputers
Users of high-performance computers traditionally have focused on the cost of acquiring the big machines instead of the costs of maintenance, power and people. Not so with "Green Destiny."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

12-Aug-2002
Mission: Luminosity
The sign says it all about our mission for this critical time in the Beams Division and at Fermilab--we are focused on improving the performance of the Tevatron for Run II, almost to the exclusion of anything else. Lots of people have already told me how much they like it--an indication that people in the division and in the laboratory are committed to succeeding.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Aug-2002
Syracuse joins the search
The first chancellor of Syracuse University allowed his cow to graze on campus. But from those pastoral roots, the university has grown to be leader in the development of science and technology in New York state. In the 1980s, Syracuse launched one of the state's first Centers for Advanced Technology–the CASE Center--to revitalize local economic growth through technology. Last year, New York state was the second-largest sponsor, after the federal government, of research at the university.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

5-Aug-2002
A great warship fights on
The best of modern science may save the most glorious of historic wrecks-the 17th century warship Vasa. Using minimally destructive analytical techniques, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) worked with marine conservators from Sweden to discover what's eating the beautiful warship. The results were published in the February 21, 2002, issue of Nature.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Algorithms -- A new perspective on data
We live in the age of information. Analysts are among those inundated with data. But with the aid of powerful computing techniques, analysts can make sense of volumes of data that come in many forms--text, numbers, images, video, audio.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
The color of genomes
New visualization techniques developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory allow researchers to compare and analyze genomes using a powerful tool that computers cannot replace--the human brain.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Neither biological nor chemical agent… Keeping mail safe in the 21st century
Snail mail may be an anachronism, but enough people still use traditional mail to make it a convenient tool for terrorists using bio-weapons that can be lethal in small quantities. And mail is an international affair.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Responding to terrorism
Even before Sept. 11, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers were thinking of ways to combat terrorism. PNNL now contributes to the U.S. State Department's Diplomatic Security Service training program, teaching foreign firefighters, police and emergency medical personnel how to deal with weapons of mass destruction--chemical, biological and radiological--that may be used by terrorists. The training is offered to first responders in partner nations, generally in the capital, where the U.S. has an embassy or consulate.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Improving airline safety
In an ongoing project for NASA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory statisticians developed a system for analyzing flight data recorded aboard commercial aircraft.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
World-class equipment for a world-class lab
After nine years in development, a superconducting magnet, weighing 16 tons and standing 21 feet high, was delivered to PNNL in March. It is part of a 900 megahertz wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The NMR is a powerful scientific instrument that will enable scientists to make new discoveries in chemical, physical, biological and life sciences. When fully operational, it will be the world's largest, highest- performing NMR, enabling researchers to investigate larger and more complex molecules at resolutions never before available.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
PNNL applies risk assessment techniques to health care
Hospitals are for healing. With the help of tools used in the nuclear, aerospace and chemical industries, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are helping make sure they stay that way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Sensor Fish gets redesign
The Sensor Fish--originally packed into a six-inch-long rubbery fish shape nicknamed "flubber fish," this data collection device later resurfaced in the shape of a juvenile fish sized plastic tube. Both the original and the tube-shaped Sensor Fish employed computer electronics to measure the pressure and acceleration changes salmon smolts experience in the severe turbulence that forms the hydraulic environment of hydroelectric dams as they migrate down the Columbia River.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Battelle names top inventor for 2002
He developed a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique that resulted in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's first million-dollar royalty license. He holds 13 U.S. patents and has numerous foreign patents and patents pending. And, now PNNL's Steve Miller has been named Battelle's Inventor of the Year for 2002.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Technology commercialization recognized nationally
The Federal Laboratory Consortium honored Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with three 2002 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards. The FLC annually recognizes federal laboratories and their employees who have made significant contributions in transferring important federally funded technology into the private sector. With 51 awards, PNNL has been honored by the FLC more than any other federal laboratory since the recognition program began in 1984.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Paving the way for proteomics
A field of study that is only about five years old is beginning to blossom at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Proteomics is the systematic study of patterns of proteins expressed in living organisms.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Biology research goes in silico
Long before a new jumbo jet takes off the runway, all of its systems and subsystems down to the tiniest of individual parts have been virtually designed, built and tested through the use of computer models and simulations. Similarly, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing virtual cells that can be explored, tested and manipulated within the world of computers to make important discoveries in systems biology.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Seeing cells in a whole new way
Steve Colson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory uses a quote from Aristotle to describe the role of PNNL's Cellular Observatory. Colson leads the Cellular Observatory, the Laboratory's effort to provide advances in imaging tools needed for a systems biology approach to molecular and cellular biology. Eventually, these tools could help enable biological solutions to challenges in energy production and use, carbon management, bioremediation and bioterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Super-Shewanella
Introducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a versatile bacterium that scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying in the Microbial Cell Project as a potential biological solution to Department of Energy sites contaminated during the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Fast glass!
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center have developed a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste. Vitrification is a process that combines concentrated radioactive waste with glass-forming materials.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Climate monitoring goes mobile
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists now have the capability to document atmospheric and climate change at locations nearly anywhere in the world, thanks to a new mobile atmospheric monitoring system developed at the Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Energy system savings stack up
An energy management system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and installed at a New York Housing Authority boiler plant in Manhattan has led to cost savings of more than $300,000 in the first year.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 726-750 out of 1101 stories.
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