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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 726-750 out of 1090 stories.
<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 > >>

31-Jul-2002
Improving airline safety
In an ongoing project for NASA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory statisticians developed a system for analyzing flight data recorded aboard commercial aircraft.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
World-class equipment for a world-class lab
After nine years in development, a superconducting magnet, weighing 16 tons and standing 21 feet high, was delivered to PNNL in March. It is part of a 900 megahertz wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The NMR is a powerful scientific instrument that will enable scientists to make new discoveries in chemical, physical, biological and life sciences. When fully operational, it will be the world's largest, highest- performing NMR, enabling researchers to investigate larger and more complex molecules at resolutions never before available.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
PNNL applies risk assessment techniques to health care
Hospitals are for healing. With the help of tools used in the nuclear, aerospace and chemical industries, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are helping make sure they stay that way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Sensor Fish gets redesign
The Sensor Fish--originally packed into a six-inch-long rubbery fish shape nicknamed "flubber fish," this data collection device later resurfaced in the shape of a juvenile fish sized plastic tube. Both the original and the tube-shaped Sensor Fish employed computer electronics to measure the pressure and acceleration changes salmon smolts experience in the severe turbulence that forms the hydraulic environment of hydroelectric dams as they migrate down the Columbia River.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Battelle names top inventor for 2002
He developed a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique that resulted in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's first million-dollar royalty license. He holds 13 U.S. patents and has numerous foreign patents and patents pending. And, now PNNL's Steve Miller has been named Battelle's Inventor of the Year for 2002.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Technology commercialization recognized nationally
The Federal Laboratory Consortium honored Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with three 2002 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards. The FLC annually recognizes federal laboratories and their employees who have made significant contributions in transferring important federally funded technology into the private sector. With 51 awards, PNNL has been honored by the FLC more than any other federal laboratory since the recognition program began in 1984.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Paving the way for proteomics
A field of study that is only about five years old is beginning to blossom at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Proteomics is the systematic study of patterns of proteins expressed in living organisms.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Biology research goes in silico
Long before a new jumbo jet takes off the runway, all of its systems and subsystems down to the tiniest of individual parts have been virtually designed, built and tested through the use of computer models and simulations. Similarly, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing virtual cells that can be explored, tested and manipulated within the world of computers to make important discoveries in systems biology.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Seeing cells in a whole new way
Steve Colson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory uses a quote from Aristotle to describe the role of PNNL's Cellular Observatory. Colson leads the Cellular Observatory, the Laboratory's effort to provide advances in imaging tools needed for a systems biology approach to molecular and cellular biology. Eventually, these tools could help enable biological solutions to challenges in energy production and use, carbon management, bioremediation and bioterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Super-Shewanella
Introducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a versatile bacterium that scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying in the Microbial Cell Project as a potential biological solution to Department of Energy sites contaminated during the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Fast glass!
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center have developed a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste. Vitrification is a process that combines concentrated radioactive waste with glass-forming materials.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Climate monitoring goes mobile
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists now have the capability to document atmospheric and climate change at locations nearly anywhere in the world, thanks to a new mobile atmospheric monitoring system developed at the Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Energy system savings stack up
An energy management system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and installed at a New York Housing Authority boiler plant in Manhattan has led to cost savings of more than $300,000 in the first year.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jul-2002
Designer molecules set the trend for advancing science
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing computational tools to rapidly design and build new molecular structures and screen them before synthesizing the real molecule. The power of this approach is illustrated in the April 26, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Mary Ace
mary.ace@pnl.gov
509-372-4277
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

25-Jul-2002
Imaging system visualizes plasma turbulence
Researchers from three laboratories funded by the U. S. Department of Energy have captured high-resolution images of instabilities that cause heat to leak rapidly from the plasma edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Alcator C-Mod fusion experiments. Advanced imaging cameras were used to freeze plasma action at a rate of up to 1 million frames per second.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Fermilab and LHC: A major stakeholder
The United States has a $531 million commitment to provide accelerator and detector components for the Large Hadron Collider, which is under construction at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and which will begin operations later this decade. With a major role in construction of the LHC accelerator and the CMS detector, Fermilab will be positioned for a major role in the emergent physics when LHC begins operating later this decade.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Measuring up
Physics is the science of measurement, and measurement relies on unchanging standards--the inch, the centimeter, the second, the electron volt. But what if a standard is distorted and unreliable? How can a measurement be accurate?

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Notes from underground
Neutrinos fly through the earth with the greatest of ease. In the blink of eye, they flit effortlessly through the planet's rocky crust at nearly the speed of light. Not so for the miners of generations past who dug their way, foot by backbreaking, dangerous foot, through the rock of Minnesota's Iron Range.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons
A small, portable detector for finding concealed nuclear weapons and materials has been developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. When fully developed, the device could assist international inspectors charged with preventing smuggling and unauthorized use of nuclear weapons and materials.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
New CO2 process for higher-density microchip fabrication
Patented process developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory is designed to remove limits to the superconductor industry's growth while also solving environmental issues.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

9-Jul-2002
Air quality study focuses on New England
In an effort to identify why the Northeastern US has some of the worst air quality in the country, NOAA's largest research vessel, along with the Department of Energy's Gulfstream research aircraft, will monitor air pollutants and their transport in the region this summer.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

8-Jul-2002
Ames Laboratory puts the 'squeeze' on communications technology
A new message-passing library that makes it possible to extract optimum performance from both workstation and personal computer clusters, as well as from large massively parallel supercomputers has been developed by researchers at Ames Laboratory. The new library, called MP_Lite, supports and enhances the basic capabilities that most software programs require to communicate between computers.

Contact: Saren Johnston
johnstons@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

2-Jul-2002
Global climate change research at Brookhaven
BNL scientists are simulating the atmosphere of the mid-21st century to see how increased levels of carbon dioxide and other trace gases may affect various ecosystems.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Jul-2002
Obesity research at Brookhaven
Brookhaven scientists are using positron emission tomography to study the role of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of reward and pleasure, in human obesity.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 726-750 out of 1090 stories.
<< < 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 > >>

 

 

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