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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 751-775 out of 1039 stories.
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19-Apr-2002
New ceramic membranes may help hydrogen replace gasoline as auto fuel
If hydrogen fuel cells are ever to replace gasoline engines in cars, they will need a cheap source of high-purity hydrogen -- and Argonne technology could provide one. Argonne's Energy Technology Division has developed a ceramic membrane that can extract hydrogen from methane, the chief component of natural gas.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
The question
This response to a Fermilab employee's email examines the reasons why particle physics research is done and how both Fermilab particle physicists and others perceive its value for our nation and the world.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Apr-2002
World's largest, most powerful NMR spectrometer
The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory celebrated the arrival of the world's largest, highest-performance nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer—a first-of-its-kind 900 megahertz (MHz) wide-bore system developed by Oxford Instruments and Varian Inc.

Contact: PNNL Public Affairs
inquiry@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Apr-2002
Brookhaven helps revise guidelines for voting systems
A scientist from Brookhaven National Laboratory has been helping the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to review and revise federal guidelines on voting systems. Specifically, the FEC invited Brookhaven's John O'Hara to review and make recommendations for revising the human-factors aspects of federal voting guidelines.

Contact: Diane Greenberg
greenb@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

14-Apr-2002
DOE science grid
IBM and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) recently announced a collaboration to begin deploying the first systems on a nationwide computing grid that will empower researchers to tackle scientific challenges beyond the capability of existing computers.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
New standard in sensor technology
The Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and the University of Michigan integrated basic research in two separate areas—organic light-emitting devices and fluorescent sensors—to develop an innovative new OLED/optical chemical sensor with possible wide-ranging applications such as medical testing, drug discovery, and pathogen detection.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Bright future for tactical laser weapons
In a demonstration at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) burned a 1-centimeter-diameter hole straight through a 2-centimeter-thick stack of steel samples in 6 seconds. The electrical current to do so came from a wall outlet and cost no more than 30 cents. While large chemical lasers have successfully shot down tactical rockets, the SSHCL design supports the weight and size requirements for a future mobile deployment.

Contact: C. Brent Dane
dane1@llnl.gov
925-424-5905
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Quantum simulations tell the atomic-level story
With quantum molecular dynamics simulations, scientists can get an accurate picture of what happens to individual atoms during an experiment.

Contact: Giulia Galli
galli@llnl.gov
925-423-4223
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-Mar-2002
Tracking down virulence in plague
How do the plague pathogen and its host interact? Scientists will apply the answer to understanding a larger set of possible agents of biological terrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

29-Mar-2002
'Dear Monica...'
Monica Charpentier, a junior at Dulaney High School in Timonium, Maryland submitted a question about the property of charge. "Just what is it?" she wanted to know. Her query found its way to Fermilab theorist Andreas Kronfeld, who welcomed the opportunity to follow her questions and insights to succeeding levels of complexity.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Mar-2002
Exploring the invisible universe
Scientists at Fermilab are deeply involved in unraveling the secrets of this invisible universe. An experiment called the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search looks for new types of particles that could be building blocks of dark matter. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has begun to record a detailed three-dimensional map of the sky, providing vast amounts of data on clusters of galaxies that seem to harbor black holes and dark matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Mar-2002
Sonic waves help recover natural gas from clogged storage sites
A new device that cleans scale from a well bore using high-intensity sound waves has shown significant promise in its first field trials. Researchers are now readying the device for more tests that could lead to the technology's commercial introduction.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Mar-2002
DOE kicks off 'deep trek' to develop deeper, smarter drilling technology
Initiative Will Develop "Smart" Drilling System for Deep Gas To meet the Nation's growing demand for natural gas, drillers will likely have to probe deeper into more hostile formations to find new gas supplies. To develop a new high-tech "smart" drilling system that can tap into deep reservoirs, the Department of Energy is beginning "Deep Trek." A solicitation is now available to developers who are interested in proposing "Deep Trek" drilling and completion concepts.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

15-Mar-2002
A new generation of supercomputers
Using paper and pencil, theorists have captured new ideas, revealed intricate mathematical relations and carried out page-long calculations. But times have changed. For many applications, physicists now prefer to attack their models and equations with the best computers available. The Fermilab theory group became one of the top players in the area of computational physics with the installation of a supercomputer called ACPMAPS in 1989.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Mar-2002
New projects to study ways to recover vast quantities of 'left behind' oil
To produce hard-to-get oil once it is located, the Department also plans to award three new contracts to improve the effectiveness of oil production technologies.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

12-Mar-2002
New projects to help operators 'see' oil, gas formations more clearly
To develop better ways for producers to "see" promising oil-bearing formations, DOE has selected six new projects to develop advanced diagnostics and imaging technologies.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
New study reveals differences in patients' response to ritalin
Findings of a new brain imaging study at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory may explain the variation in doses needed to treat attention/hyperactivity disorder. The study appears in the March 1, 2002 issue of the journal Synapse.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
Hand-held radiation detector could outsmart terrorists
Engineers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a 10-pound, battery-powered radiation detector called Cryo3 that is intended to outsmart anyone trying to smuggle radioactive material into the country.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

6-Mar-2002
New projects to explore 'breakthrough' ideas for capturing, storing carbon gases
As part of its efforts to develop "breakthrough" approaches for reducing the threat of global climate change, the Department has added three new projects to develop ways to capture carbon dioxide released from power plants and safely prevent it from entering the atmosphere.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

3-Mar-2002
Atmospheric aerosols found to brighten clouds
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Purdue University combine satellite data with model calculations to study whether atmospheric aerosols increase the brightness of clouds enough to have a potential impact on climate. Higher reflectivity of brighter clouds may result in global cooling, partially offsetting the greenhouse effect. The Brookhaven-Purdue study was reported in the February 19, 2002 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
From kilobytes to petabytes in 50 years
"The day when the scientist, no matter how devoted, can make significant progress alone and without material help has passed." - E.O. Lawrence, founder of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on accepting the 1939 Nobel Prize for Physics.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
L-Gel decontaminates better than bleach
Scientists have developed a material that is safe for people and the environment but deadly to the agents of biological and chemical warfare.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Faster inspection of laser coatings
Lasers have been a Lawrence Livermore specialty almost since the first laser flashed in 1960. Dealing with the challenges that arise as these lasers get bigger and more powerful is, of necessity, a specialty too.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Giving an EDGE to sustainable design
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed tools for sustainable design, a term that describes a systematic approach to ensuring that facilities, products and processes are addressing the "triple bottom line" - the environment, economics and social equity.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Modernizing the military
From software to identification systems, diagnostics to emergency management, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed technologies that could support the military as it moves into the 21st century.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 751-775 out of 1039 stories.
<< < 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 > >>

 

 

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