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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 751-775 out of 1067 stories.
<< < 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 > >>

24-May-2002
Beam me up
Marking the completion of its detector with a final cup of ultra-pure mineral oil—the last of 250,000 gallons of this translucent liquid—MiniBooNE is about to start the quest to repeat the landmark result of the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-May-2002
LANSCE builds on 2001 successes as it readies for new run
As researchers at the world’s most powerful linear accelerator prepare for the upcoming run cycle, they look back on a successful 2001 run cycle that produced scores of experimental results for basic and defense science, built key new facilities and instruments and set records for operating efficiency.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
HERPES database online
To aid in the search for cures and vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a publicly available Web database containing the Human herpesvirus 2 genomic sequence.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Research with high magnetic fields
The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory develops for use in basic research the world's most powerful pulsed electromagnets. A super-powerful generator can deliver a pulse equal to more than one million times the magnetic field found naturally on Earth.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracking the identity and origin of biological threats
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northern Arizona University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed sophisticated tools to analyze and identify the DNA of biological threat agents, including those that cause anthrax and plague.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Pipe locating sensor could help prevent natural gas leaks
A new flat plate sensor being developed by DOE and the Gas Technology Institute could pinpoint underground natural gas pipes before they can be accidentally damaged by "third party" construction crews.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

13-May-2002
Two years of SNO prove the case: Solar neutrinos really do change
Most solar neutrinos undergo a metamorphosis during their 93-million-mile journey to Earth, according to results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). This contradicts the predictions of the Standard Model, but explains why experimenters have been able to measure far fewer solar neutrinos than expected.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10-May-2002
Near-frictionless carbon coating nears commercial applications
Four years and more than 3,000 phone calls and e-mail contacts later, Argonne's "near-frictionless carbon" coating stands on the brink of commercialization. A sample of the coating on a sapphire substrate survived 17.5 million passes of a steel ball. After 32 days, the testing machine failed, but the ball left only a barely visible track on the coating.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

10-May-2002
Charged Up - There's nothing neutral about Boris Kayser
Kayser, 63, is an overtly enthusiastic particle physics theorist whose eyebrows and voice rise in proportion to his excitement. He joined the staff of Fermilab's theoretical physics department in October 2001, with the title of Fermilab distinguished scientist. He brought with him more than a decade of academic research, and three decades at the National Science Foundation (NSF). As Fermilab undertakes its neutrino detection and oscillation experiments with MiniBooNE and MINOS, Kayser hopes for a confrontation with big questions.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-May-2002
Molecular shuttling
The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory researchers observed molecular shuttling on a man-made membrane that mimics cellular behavior. Recurring movements may evolve into rudimentary tools of nanoconstruction. These observations were published as the cover story in the April 30, 2002, issue of the chemical and biophysics journal Langmuir.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

6-May-2002
Looking for clues about how proteins talk to each other
Physicists at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveal that interactions among proteins at the cellular level are not random, but well organized. The results of this study are published in the May 3, 2002, issue of Science.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-May-2002
Interactions: the un-common language of science
FermiNews presents an ongoing series dedicated to issues and opportunities in communicating high-energy physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-May-2002
BechteLink delivers tools to the field engineer
Improving engineering, procurement and construction processes in the field through advanced information technologies is the backbone of an INEEL project called BechteLink. According to National Security's Advanced Information and Communication System employee Greg Miller, BechteLink's goal is to 'provide unfettered access to knowledge.'

Contact: Greg Miller
millgv@inel.gov
208-526-4697
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Simulating supernovae on supercomputers
Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae will answer important questions about the creation and dissemination of elements that make life possible. They may also be important in the development of “enabling technologies” for other applications, such as combustion, climate, fusion, stockpile stewardship, and nuclear medicine.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling blood flow during CPR
Thanks to computer modeling, a scientific discovery was made that might lead to a way to save victims of cardiac arrest.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Probing cells by computer
A computational analysis of human and bacterial genomes by ORNL researchers provides insights into what our genes do. ORNL researchers will soon be predicting 100 protein structures a day and evaluating which compounds could make highly effective therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
A National resource at ORNL
Supercomputers at ORNL are enabling scientists in a number of fields to make discoveries that could not be made through either theoretical or experimental research.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL's powerful tools for scientific discovery
ORNL offers 5.5 teraflops of computing to advance scientific discovery. Some ORNL computational research is funded by DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL, IBM, and the Blue Gene Project
ORNL is working with IBM to develop the Blue Gene supercomputer for relating protein shapes to disease.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Evaluating supercomputer performance
In selecting the right machine on which to run a code or the next machine to buy, evaluators of supercomputers focus on many parameters ranging from speeds to terabytes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling magnetic materials
Materials research using supercomputers is paving the way for the next generation of information technology.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Networking: making faster connections among supercomputers
ORNL researchers are devising ways to move large data files faster over computer networks and to reduce delays in data delivery so supercomputers are not idle.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Visualization tools: interacting with data in many dimensions
Visualization tools used in the CAVE™ virtual reality theater at ORNL let scientists interact with predicted phenomena such as stellar explosions and climate changes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Designing electronic devices using supercomputers
A proposed molecular memory cell that would allow laptop computer batteries to last 100 times longer than today’s batteries is being modeled computationally on an IBM supercomputer at ORNL. This machine is also being used to simulate electron transport in carbon nanotubes in contact with other components, for future nanoscale electronic devices.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 751-775 out of 1067 stories.
<< < 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 > >>

 

 

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