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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 776-800 out of 1039 stories.
<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>

1-Mar-2002
Sophisticated imagery analysis
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory launched its Imaging Science and Technology Initiative (ISAT) in 2001 to cover a broad range of potential applications, including counterterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Border training helps reduce dangerous smuggling
A joint program between the U.S. Customs Service and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides training to foreign border guards, customs patrol and frontier police on how to spot red flags that should trigger a search, as well as how to use specialized technology to detect and identify items used to make nuclear, chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Airport security scanner for safer skies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have spent more than 12 years developing a Personal Security Scanner that allows security guards to "see" concealed weapons, including plastic explosives and other nonmetallic threats.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Information analysis—by Starlight
Much like individual stars coalesce to form constellations, information visualization software developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helps decision-makers see the importance of individual pieces of data by showing how they relate to one another.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic components—lipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Tevatron luminosity makes an uphill climb
Collider Run II at Fermilab's Tevatron officially began on March 1, 2001. Since Tevatron operations resumed in November, 2001, after a two-month shutdown for accelerator and detector upgrades, luminosity has increased more slowly than hoped for. Fermilab has in place a plan to raise the luminosity to the desired levels by the end of 2002.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
Providing technical aid to small producers in America's oil fields
Fracturing, New Computer Imaging Focus of Recent DOE Selections More than half of America's oil production from the lower 48 States is supplied by small independent producers. As these companies become increasingly important to America's energy security, the Energy Department continues to provide grants for the smallest of these producers to test better technologies that can keep their wells pumping.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
11 physics questions for the new century
The February 2002 issue of Discover magazine based its cover story on the recent 105-page public draft of the National Research Council Committee on Physics of the Universe report, Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos: 11 Science Questions for the New Century.

Contact: DOE Office of Science
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-Feb-2002
International effort to sequence the first tree genome
Cottonwoods, hybrid poplars, and aspens could play a role in improving the environment, displacing imported oil and creating domestic jobs, but first scientists from the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and around the world must sequence the Populus genome.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
Cracking the mystery of cracks
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have performed first-of-a-kind, high-resolution examinations of cracks in stainless steel core components from commercial nuclear reactors, dispelling many of the traditionally held beliefs about how cracks develop and spread.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
State-of-the-art magnetoelectronics lab puts Ames Lab on thin-film fast track
Tucked away in a small laboratory space on the second floor of Metals Development is new, state-of-the-art research equipment that should help boost Ames Lab researchers David Jiles and John Snyder to the forefront of thin-film research and the newly emerging field of magnetoelectronics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Painless physics: a particle dialogue
What are electrons, protons and neutrons, how do we define them, how do they fit into the theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model—and how do we use them to explore the subatomic world?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Recycling antimatter becomes reality
Antimatter is arguably the rarest stuff Mother Nature provides here on earth. Created in high-energy particle collisions, antiparticles quickly disappear by reacting with ordinary matter. Using powerful accelerators, physicists have learned to produce and control tiny amounts of antimatter. Scientists at Fermilab are now taking a new approach to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for antimatter: they will recycle antiprotons.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Passively safe reactors rely on nature to keep them cool
The basic purpose of reactor safety is to protect the public and plant workers from harmful radiation exposure. The goal of modern safety design is to provide this protection by relying on the laws of nature, rather than on engineered systems that require power to operate, equipment to function properly and operators to take correct actions in stressful emergency situations. To achieve this, you have to remove decay heat, contain radioactive materials, and maintain a proper balance between heat generation and heat removal.

Contact: Dave Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
630-252-5584
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Researchers reach to the skies to reveal the secrets of the stars
In 2003, Argonne scientists will analyze solar wind--single atoms and electrically charged particles from the sun--samples from NASA's Genesis mission in an effort to better understand how the planets formed and how the sun works. If successful, Genesis will become the first mission to return a sample of extraterrestrial material from beyond the moon. These samples will allow a precise measure of the elemental and isotopic composition of our most important star - the sun.

Contact: Steve Koppes
s-koppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

31-Jan-2002
Down-to-earth scientist
One of the first scientists hired for INEEL's Subsurface Science Initiative uses engineering, chemistry and some creative thinking to get under the earth's skin.

Contact: George Redden
reddgd@inel.gov
208-526-0765
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Disorderly superconductors caught in the act
The "granular" nature of superconductivity in underdoped high-temperature superconductors proposed by theorists has had some believers but many skeptics. New observations, reported in the 24 January issue of Nature, may shift how researchers think about these materials.

Contact: Paul Preuss
ul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Neutrino measurement surprises Fermilab physicists
Experimenters at Fermilab's NuTeV (Neutrinos at the Tevatron) experiment measured the ratio of two types of particles—neutrinos and muons—emerging from high-energy collisions of neutrinos with target nuclei.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Jan-2002
Microarrays for detecting pathogens
Microarrays are tiny probes placed on a piece of glass or other material. Each probe is sensitive to a specific pathogen. The arrays are flooded with a complex mixture of DNA or RNA from environmental samples and individual probes react if particular pathogens are present.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 776-800 out of 1039 stories.
<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>

 

 

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