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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 876-900 out of 1074 stories.
<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>

5-Nov-2001
National Lab astrophysicists explore supernovae with an eye on national security
The SciDAC program within DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research supports High Energy and Nuclear Physics research in the use of terascale computers to dramatically extend exploration of the fundamental processes of nature, as well as advance the ability to predict the behavior of a broad range of complex natural and engineered systems.

Contact: Anne M. Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Magnetic refrigerator successfully tested
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Oct-2001
Idaho Accelerator Center leads the way in research and education
The Idaho Accelerator Center stands as a monument to the future--using science to develop devices to further national security, healthcare, and business.

Contact: James Jones
jlj@inel.gov
208-526-1730
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
World's largest unclassified supercomputer
Scientists at universities and national laboratories across the country are now tapping into the power of the world's largest supercomputer dedicated to unclassified research and have reported important breakthroughs in climate research, materials science and astrophysics.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
Gene-rich pufferfish DNA decoded
Although the Fugu genome contains essentially the same genes and regulatory sequences as the human genome, it carries those genes and regulatory sequences in approximately 365 million bases as compared to the 3 billion bases that make up human DNA. With far less so-called "junk DNA" to sort through, finding genes and controlling sequences in the Fugu genome should be a much easier task.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
SciDAC DOE initiative targets heart of fusion machine
Fusion energy, evident in the sun and stars, is the ultimate source of power because it provides an environmentally acceptable alternative to energy generated by fossil fuels. To achieve fusion energy requires that the fuel material be heated to hundreds of millions of degrees, much hotter than the sun.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
Cancer-detecting microchip
clever technique for detecting proteins by inducing them to stick to and bend a microscopic cantilever—essentially a diving board the size of a hair—is sensitive enough to serve as a diagnostic assay for the protein markers characteristic of prostate cancer, a team of scientists report in the September issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rls@pa.urel.berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Run II well under control
On March 1, Collider Run II began at Fermilab. It is a six-year enterprise to produce a record number of proton-antiproton collisions using the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Tevatron.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
A case of identity: Kerberos
Question for our time: Who are you, and can you prove it? Increasingly, the computing solution for these questions in these times is Kerberos, a system of "strong authentication" for computer users invented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and already operating at many universities and several Department of Energy national laboratories.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Oct-2001
Virtual lung models every breath you take — and its impact
The computer model, called the virtual respiratory tract, provides an unprecedented, three-dimensional view of how pollutants enter, travel through and collect in the entire respiratory system. PNNL's prototype system models the nose, larynx and lungs of a rat. Efforts are underway to similarly model the respiratory systems of monkeys and humans.

Contact: Staci Maloof
Staci.Maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Oct-2001
Spinach protein could offer new hope for the blind
Spinach, touted in the Popeye cartoon for its ability to strengthen the body, may prove even more valuable for restoring vision to people who are legally blind. People who suffer from age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa, diseases that are leading causes of blindness worldwide, may find hope in this research.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Oct-2001
Genetic research identifies new risk factor in heart disease
Dr. Edward Rubin, who heads the Genome Sciences Department in the Life Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), and Len Pennacchio, an Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Fellow working in Rubin's research group, led a study in which the new gene—named apoAV—was identified by comparing the DNA sequences of humans and mice. ApoAV's function was tested first in genetically engineered mice then in human clinical studies and shown to significantly influence triglyceride levels in both mammals.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Yeung's new technology is Editors' Choice
The award-winning technology, Absorption Detection System in Multiple Capillaries, developed by Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been named the Most Promising New Technology by the editors of R&D Magazine.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
A giant among us
Klaus Ruedenberg, an Ames Laboratory senior associate and an Iowa State University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, has been chosen to receive the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Doing what comes naturally
Edward S. Yeung, director of Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences Program and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been selected for the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Chromatography.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Real-life training without the risks
Much like flight simulators that provide real-world experience to pilots without jeopardizing lives, a new cyber security training capability will give computer system administrators experience defending against cyber attacks without compromising their networks.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Supercomputers look to the stars for answers
To people like astrophysicist Tony Mezzacappa at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, this work is about more than just satisfying their curiosity. The project is aimed at answering some basic questions about the origin of life.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
How some viruses take strong hold of cells
As part of an ongoing effort to understand how viruses infect cells, scientists at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory have deciphered the molecular-level interaction between coxsackievirus—which infects the heart, brain, pancreas, and other organs—and the human cell protein to which it attaches. This work may lead to improved ways to thwart viral infections, and may help scientists design virus-based vehicles for gene therapy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Taking the heat off: Nanofluids promise efficient heat transfer
By manipulating atoms on the smallest of scales, Argonne scientists have created a next-generation fluid that may revolutionize heat transfer. By adding tiny spherical particles to a conventional fluid, researchers can improve by up to 40 percent its ability to transfer heat.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
New instrument effective in detecting chemical weapons
Researchers at DOE’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory can now detect part-per-million levels of chemical warfare agents chemical warfare agents such as the blister agent HD or the nerve agent VX on soil or plant surfaces within 5 to 10 minutes using a new ion-trap secondary ion mass spectrometer.

Contact: Garold Gresham
vrn@inel.gov
208-526-6684
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Gravity in large extra dimensions
n 1998, Nima Arkani-Hamed found himself pondering one of the conundrums of modern physics: why is gravity so much weaker than the other fundamental forces? Surrounded by massive objects like falling apples, orbiting moons, and our own occasionally clumsy bodies, we don't think of gravity as weak. Compared to electromagnetism, however-or the aptly named strong force that binds quarks, or even the "weak" force that governs some forms of radioactive decay-gravity is feeble.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 876-900 out of 1074 stories.
<< < 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 > >>

 

 

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