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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 951-975 out of 1078 stories.
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13-Aug-2001
New acoustic camera captures picture of fish passage
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then how valuable is a high-resolution image of fish seen through murky water? Very valuable, according to scientists seeking to understand fish movement near hydropower dams. Recently, fisheries biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory deployed an acoustic camera originally designed for the Navy at a dam in the Northwest to study and illuminate their understanding of fish behavior.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Aug-2001
New magnetic semiconductor material spins hope for quantum computing
The future of quantum computing offers the potential for substantially greater data storage and faster processing speeds, but its advancement has been limited by the absence of certain critically important materials—in particular, a semiconductor that is magnetic at room temperature. Now, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a semiconductor material that has superior magnetic properties at room temperature.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
R & D 100 Award is fourth for Ed Yeung and 15th for Ames Lab
Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences, has won a 2001 R&D 100 Award for a remarkable advance in chemical separation technology called multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab researcher's team shines in protein folding predictions
The protein folding puzzle – determining the3--D structure of a protein given the sequence of its amino acids – is one of the major unsolved problems in molecular biology. A Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist along with a colleague and his students were recently recognized as the most successful team in an annual worldwide assessment of progress in protein structure prediction.

Contact: Charlie Strauss
cems@lanl.gov
505-665-4838
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Riding the d-wave
A paper appearing in a recent issue of the journal Nature has helped validate a theory on the enigmatic nature of superconducting materials that was first advanced by Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Alexander Balatsky and his colleagues five years ago. The confirmation of the theory is another step in solving the enigma of superconductivity.

Contact: Alexander Balatsky
avb@lanl.gov
505-665-0077
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
The magnetic universe
Researchers in Applied Physics and Theory Divisions have recently compiled a sample of nearly 100 giant radio galaxies powered by black holes.

Contact: Hui Li
li@nis-mail.lanl.gov
505-665-3131
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Researchers find human's earliest ancestor yet
An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of fossil bones and teeth belonging to the earliest human ancestors yet discovered – a hominid who lived in what is now Ethiopia between 5.2 and 5.8 million years ago.

Contact: Giday WoldGabriel
wgiday@lanl.gov
505-667-8749
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab builds world's first neptunium sphere
For the first time ever, a cross-section of nuclear materials scientists and technicians at the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has fashioned an eight- kilogram tungsten-and nickel-clad sphere of neptunium. The actinide metal sphere will be used in criticality safety and nuclear non-proliferation experiments at Technical Area 18, the critical experiments facility.

Contact: Larry Ussery
LUSSERY@LANL.GOV
505-665-0207
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Jul-2001
Building the buckyball -- A bowl at a time
Showing a new, naturally occurring compound to a research chemist is, in a way, like throwing down a gauntlet. The unspoken challenge being issued — create this in the lab. For Peter Rabideau, that gauntlet has been the buckyball. Rabideau, an Ames Laboratory senior chemist, has moved a step closer to meeting that challenge by developing a practical means of producing bowl-shaped segments — buckybowls — that could eventually be pieced together to form the complete ball.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

26-Jul-2001
Are the digits of pi random? A Berkeley Lab researcher may hold the key
Pi, the ubiquitous number whose first few digits are 3.14159, is irrational, which means that its digits run on forever (by now they have been calculated to billions of places) and never repeat in a cyclical fashion. Numbers like pi are also thought to be "normal," which means that their digits are random in a certain statistical sense.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Jul-2001
Earliest hominid discovery not the missing link — But close
The discovery of fossil remains of a hominid that lived in what is now Ethiopia between 5.2 and 5.8 million years ago are the subject of two articles in the July 12 issue of Nature. Hominid refers to the family of primates that includes all species on the "human" side of the evolutionary tree after the split from chimpanzees.

Contact: James E. Rickman
elvis@lanl.gov
505-665-9203
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-Jul-2001
Radiation treatment in ducks may offer clues to brain tumors in children
The Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has tested an experimental microbeam radiation therapy on duck embryos that may offer clues about how to treat brain tumors in infants and young children.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
The great solar car race: Cars will race along Route 66 without a drop of gas
As many as 40 race cars will leave Chicago July 15 in the first-ever attempt to travel America's historic Route 66 without spending a penny on gasoline. In a year that has seen unpredictable energy and gasoline prices, these drivers are betting that sunshine will take them all the way to Los Angeles, a feat that has never been tried in the 75-year history of the highway.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Progress recognized with international awards
The leaders of two energy efficiency centers received the Climate Technology Initiative's World Climate Technology and Leadership Awards in 2000 for accelerating the spread of environmentally sound technologies and practices.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A national lab with global impact
Albert Einstein once said, "Imagination encircles the world." At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we take this message to heart. The innovations of our scientists and engineers not only address some of the most critical challenges facing our nation—they are making a mark on the world.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
From lab to market
What do two devices to detect nuclear explosions, a sensor technology used in food processing, cancer treatment and a software program for collaboration have in common? The researchers who developed these technologies at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were among the 35 honored by the Federal Laboratory Consortium for technology transfer into the private sector.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
One technology, countless applications
From personal security to custom clothing, better-fitting prosthetics to virtual reality video games—the list of potential applications for a new three-dimensional imaging technology developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory goes on and on.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
More than the bare bones for implant patients
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers developed a unique bone-like coating process that addresses the problem of poor bonds between artificial joints and real bone. It could potentially increase the useful life of hip, knee and other joint replacements as well as dental implants.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Centers support energy efficiency in six nations
Over the last 10 years, the Czech Republic has been improving energy efficiency in its hospitals and health facilities, schools, industrial plants and city-owned buildings. One of six energy-efficiency centers that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helped establish—The Czech Republic Center for Energy Efficiency—leads these efforts.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Drug delivery right on target
One of the challenges in treating cancerous tumors with chemotherapy and medical isotopes is maximizing the treatment of cancer cells while minimizing the potential for harming healthy tissue. With materials being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, a more targeted approach might be on the way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A bright idea in efficient lighting
After shedding light on what could make compact fluorescent light bulbs more attractive to businesses and consumers, a program that introduced shorter, brighter and less expensive bulbs has seen shining success.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Helping keep the world at peace
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the concept of "security" extends far beyond the traditional meaning of the word to include addressing environmental, economic, energy and health concerns.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Moving Indonesia toward technology-based business
When an agency of the Indonesian government wanted to develop a more business-like approach to providing technology services to the private sector, it found a "twin" in the United States to help with the transition. According to a World Bank report, for years Indonesia relied on its natural resources—oil, natural gas and forestry. In the 1980s, however, Indonesia began focusing on developing its technology capabilities as the most promising source of sustainable growth for the future.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Slick software aids Mexican oil industry
Through adaptation and translation, software originally developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army will soon be installed at an oil refinery in Mexico.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Preserving liquid assets
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have partnered with Mexican experts to develop a sustainable water management strategy for Mexico City and its aquifer, which serves 20 million people.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 951-975 out of 1078 stories.
<< < 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 > >>

 

 

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