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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 976-1000 out of 1091 stories.
<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>

11-Jul-2001
The great solar car race: Cars will race along Route 66 without a drop of gas
As many as 40 race cars will leave Chicago July 15 in the first-ever attempt to travel America's historic Route 66 without spending a penny on gasoline. In a year that has seen unpredictable energy and gasoline prices, these drivers are betting that sunshine will take them all the way to Los Angeles, a feat that has never been tried in the 75-year history of the highway.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Progress recognized with international awards
The leaders of two energy efficiency centers received the Climate Technology Initiative's World Climate Technology and Leadership Awards in 2000 for accelerating the spread of environmentally sound technologies and practices.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A national lab with global impact
Albert Einstein once said, "Imagination encircles the world." At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we take this message to heart. The innovations of our scientists and engineers not only address some of the most critical challenges facing our nation—they are making a mark on the world.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
From lab to market
What do two devices to detect nuclear explosions, a sensor technology used in food processing, cancer treatment and a software program for collaboration have in common? The researchers who developed these technologies at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were among the 35 honored by the Federal Laboratory Consortium for technology transfer into the private sector.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
One technology, countless applications
From personal security to custom clothing, better-fitting prosthetics to virtual reality video games—the list of potential applications for a new three-dimensional imaging technology developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory goes on and on.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
More than the bare bones for implant patients
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers developed a unique bone-like coating process that addresses the problem of poor bonds between artificial joints and real bone. It could potentially increase the useful life of hip, knee and other joint replacements as well as dental implants.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Centers support energy efficiency in six nations
Over the last 10 years, the Czech Republic has been improving energy efficiency in its hospitals and health facilities, schools, industrial plants and city-owned buildings. One of six energy-efficiency centers that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helped establish—The Czech Republic Center for Energy Efficiency—leads these efforts.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Drug delivery right on target
One of the challenges in treating cancerous tumors with chemotherapy and medical isotopes is maximizing the treatment of cancer cells while minimizing the potential for harming healthy tissue. With materials being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, a more targeted approach might be on the way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A bright idea in efficient lighting
After shedding light on what could make compact fluorescent light bulbs more attractive to businesses and consumers, a program that introduced shorter, brighter and less expensive bulbs has seen shining success.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Helping keep the world at peace
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the concept of "security" extends far beyond the traditional meaning of the word to include addressing environmental, economic, energy and health concerns.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Moving Indonesia toward technology-based business
When an agency of the Indonesian government wanted to develop a more business-like approach to providing technology services to the private sector, it found a "twin" in the United States to help with the transition. According to a World Bank report, for years Indonesia relied on its natural resources—oil, natural gas and forestry. In the 1980s, however, Indonesia began focusing on developing its technology capabilities as the most promising source of sustainable growth for the future.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Slick software aids Mexican oil industry
Through adaptation and translation, software originally developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army will soon be installed at an oil refinery in Mexico.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Preserving liquid assets
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have partnered with Mexican experts to develop a sustainable water management strategy for Mexico City and its aquifer, which serves 20 million people.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Clearing up core corrosion cracking
In a project with the Electric Power Research Institute (now officially known as EPRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is taking a closer look at what causes corrosion or cracking in reactor core components. With collaborative funding from more than seven countries and a dozen agencies, researchers are studying core component materials to build an understanding of the radiation-induced material changes that promote environmental cracking.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Research partnership formed
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland have joined forces to advance the understanding of global climate change. The Joint Global Change Research Institute, announced in March 2001, will investigate the scientific, social and economic implications of climate change, both nationally and globally.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Grounding greenhouse gases
Moving carbon out of the atmosphere and storing it in the ground offers a promising approach to reducing greenhouse gases, principally carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are exploring how different soil management practices affect the fungal activity in soils and how that relates to the soils' ability to store carbon.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Global change - addressing a global concern
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are contributing to the scientific understanding of global climate change— pursuing a broad understanding that will serve as thefoundation for future policy and technology solutions.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
MicroCATS in space
Through a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Laboratory is furthering the development of micro chemical and thermal systems, or MicroCATS, for chemical processing in space applications. The contract calls for both ground testing and testing in reduced-gravity situations. For Ward TeGrotenhuis and Susie Stenkamp of the Laboratory's chemical and biological processes development group, this means that one or both of them may be experiencing weightlessness and performing mid-air laboratory tests.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Counting cosmic rays
In a cooperative effort, Pacific Northwest built the hardware and NASA supplied the software for the device nicknamed MARIE, for Mars Radiation Environment Experiment.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Biomolecular Networks Initiative launches Web site
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory introduced a new Web site in April to share information about its Biomolecular Networks Initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Technologies featured in cyberspace marketplace
These days you can find anything on the web—even technology solutions ready for commercialization. Technologies developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are now among those listed on yet2.com, the first global forum for commercialization and technology transfer via the Internet.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Oh boy, what a buoy!
Although most buoys are permanent fixtures serving a single purpose, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory have developed a lightweight portable buoy complete with cell-phone technology and interchangeable sensors.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Coconuts supply power to rural community
A typical coconut palm can produce 50 coconuts annually and lives an average of 75 years. For residents of Alaminos, a rural community in the Philippines, this means a ready supply of fuel for the newly designed small-modular biomass power system (SMB), BioMax 15.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
XMM-Newton makes unusual discoveries in Andromeda Galaxy
In its first look at the Andromeda Galaxy, known as M31, the X-ray multi-mirror satellite observatory has revealed several unusual X-ray sources.

Contact: Sergey P. Trudolyubov
tsp@lanl.gov
505-665-0019
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A new look at old fission mysteries
When theoretical physicist Peter Möller worked on his thesis at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1973, his calculation of the nuclear potential energy for 175 different nuclear shapes, or grid points, pushed the limits of existing computational power. Using one IBM computer punch card to define each grid point, Möller's total input data card deck for the calculation was about one inch thick.

Contact: Peter Moller
moller@lanl.govW
505-665-2210
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 976-1000 out of 1091 stories.
<< < 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 > >>

 

 

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