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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 39 stories.
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11-Dec-2014
DESY's Henry Chapman awarded Leibniz Prize for X-ray laser research
Henry Chapman, a scientist at Germany's DESY lab who participated in pioneering studies at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, has been awarded the Leibniz Prize. The 2.5 million euro ($3.1 million) scientific award is bestowed by a German research foundation. LCLS is a Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Dec-2014
Study may help slow the spread of flu
An important study conducted in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory may lead to new, more effective vaccines and medicines by revealing detailed information about how a flu antibody binds to a wide variety of flu viruses.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Dec-2014
X-ray laser reveals how bacterial protein morphs in response to light
Researchers have captured the highest-resolution snapshots ever taken with an X-ray laser that show changes in a protein's structure over time, revealing how a key protein in a photosynthetic bacterium changes shape when hit by light. They achieved a resolution of 1.6 angstroms, equivalent to the radius of a single tin atom.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Nov-2014
Robotics meet X-ray lasers in cutting-edge biology studies
Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are combining the speed and precision of robots with one of the brightest X-ray lasers on the planet for pioneering studies of proteins important to biology and drug discovery.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Nov-2014
New project will expand opportunities for biological discovery with SLAC's X-ray laser
A planned experimental station at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will expand capabilities for atomic-scale explorations in human health, biology, energy and environmental science using one of the brightest X-ray sources on the planet.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Nov-2014
Researchers take snapshots of potential 'kill switch' for cancer
A study conducted in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has revealed how a key human protein switches from a form that protects cells to a form that kills them -- a property that scientists hope to exploit as a 'kill switch' for cancer.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Oct-2014
National Synchrotron Light Source II achieves 'first light'
The National Synchrotron Light Source II detects its first photons, beginning a new phase of the facility's operations. Scientific experiments at NSLS-II are expected to begin before the end of the year.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Oct-2014
Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms
A new study at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, published Sept. 24 in Nature Communications, has cracked one mystery of glass to shed light on the mechanism that triggers its deformation before shattering. The study improves understanding of glassy deformation and may accelerate broader application of metallic glass, a moldable, wear-resistant, magnetically exploitable material that is thrice as strong as the mightiest steel and ten times as springy.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Oct-2014
A better prosthesis: Sandia invents sensor to learn about fit; system to make fit better
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Jason Wheeler has been working to make prostheses more comfortable in a twofold approach: sensors that detect how the prosthesis fits and a system to make the fit better. He points out that it doesn't matter how high-tech a prosthesis is if it's not comfortable.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

10-Oct-2014
Researchers look inside to reveal workings of a powerful biochemical switch
Using X-rays and neutron beams, a team of researchers have revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

6-Oct-2014
Study reveals 'bellhops' in cell walls can double as hormones
Researchers have discovered that some common messenger molecules in human cells double as hormones when bound to a protein that interacts with DNA. The finding could bring to light a class of previously unknown hormones and lead to new ways to target diseases -- including cancers and a host of hormone-related disorders.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Sep-2014
Unlocking enzyme synthesis of rare sugars to create drugs with fewer side effects
A team led by the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has unlocked the enzymatic synthesis process of rare sugars, which are useful in developing drugs with low side effects using a process more friendly to the environment.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Sep-2014
Research pinpoints role of 'helper' atoms in oxygen release
Experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve a long-standing mystery in the role calcium atoms serve in a chemical reaction that releases oxygen into the air we breathe. The results offer new clues about atomic-scale processes that drive the life-sustaining cycle of photosynthesis and could help forge a foundation for producing cleaner energy sources by synthesizing nature's handiwork.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Sep-2014
Carbon sequestration research continues at Sandia Labs under Energy Department funds
Sandia researchers are sharing a four-year, $12 million Department of Energy research contract on the long-term geologic sequestration of carbon. The contract from the department's Office of Science funds research by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

12-Sep-2014
Best of 2 worlds
The Bredesen Center is the beginning of a new way of doing graduate education.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Sep-2014
Scientists map protein in living bacterial cells
Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with an X-ray laser, could allow scientists to explore some components of living cells as never before. The research, published Aug. 18 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Sep-2014
Researcher wins x-ray science award for SSRL work aiding chemistry studies
Chris Pollock, a postdoctoral researcher at The Pennsylvania State University, whose research at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was key in adapting an X-ray technique to probe chemical bonds in new ways, has been named the latest recipient of an annual scientific award.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

26-Aug-2014
Oak Ridge supercomputer turns the tide for consumer products research
Consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble has turned to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and America's fastest supercomputer to simulate microscopic processes that can threaten product performance and stability.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Aug-2014
Catalytic gold nanoclusters promise rich chemical yields
With scientists from Carnegie Mellon University, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a catalyst containing exactly 25 gold atoms that catalyzes the conversion of various molecules, including the transformation of poisonous carbon monoxide into harmless carbon dioxide, a reaction that may find application in devices near gas flues or wood-burning stoves.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29-Jul-2014
Watching neurons fire from a front-row seat
Sandia National Laboratories is working with Arizona State University on the challenge of recording and measuring signals from the brain.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

21-May-2014
Tethys: A robust source of information on marine energy, offshore wind projects
Wondering what the impact on killer whales might be from a turbine installed under the sea? Check out Tethys, a robust online resource available for free to anyone interested in ocean energy and offshore wind resources. Tethys focuses on the environmental effects of energy projects that are proposed, underway or completed in the ocean and above it.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

13-May-2014
Brookhaven physicist Elaine DiMasi edits book on biomineralization techniques
'The Biomineralization Sourcebook' is a how-to manual for synchrotron scientists interested in characterizing organic materials, showcasing methods from scientists who have worked at NSLS and light sources around the world.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-May-2014
What lies beneath
The effects of biogeochemical and geochemical processes in the ground under us are on massive scales. Understanding what's going on down there and how it effects what's going on up here is an enormous undertaking. Scientists working at EMSL are getting a handle on these gigantic macroscopic processes by focusing on the microscopic scale. By creating micromodels and incorporating supercomputer simulations, researchers are connecting the molecular level with processes that affect our entire ecosystem.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

29-Apr-2014
Label-free, sequence-specific, inexpensive fluorescent DNA sensors
Using principles of energy transfer more commonly applied to designing solar cells, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new highly sensitive way to detect specific sequences of DNA, the genetic material unique to every living thing. As described in a paper published in the journal Chemistry of Materials, the method is considerably less costly than other DNA assays and has widespread potential for applications in forensics, medical diagnostics, and the detection of bioterror agents.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

11-Apr-2014
Simulation solves mystery of how liquid-crystal thin films disintegrate
Approximately four decades ago, theoreticians believed that only one of two mechanisms could explain rupture of liquid-crystal thin films. They also believed that these two mechanisms could not coexist. But 10 years ago experiments showed that these two mechanisms in many cases do coexist, according to Trung Nguyen of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who ran unprecedented large-scale molecular dynamics simulations on Titan, America's fastest supercomputer, to model the beginnings of ruptures in thin films.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 39 stories.
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