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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 167 stories.
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4-May-2016
How Ameriflux helped determine the impact of the 2012 US drought on the carbon cycle
In 2012, the United States experienced the warmest spring on record followed by the most severe drought since the Dust Bowl. A team of scientists used a network of Ameriflux sites to map the carbon flux across the United States during the drought.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
Doe-Anderson

26-Apr-2016
The Pellet Stove Design Challenge: We have a winner!
At Brookhaven Lab last week, seven finalists competed to be designated the top-performing pellet stove. The three-day Pellet Stove Design Challenge, organized by the Alliance for Green Heat, featured stove demonstrations and testing as well as presentations and round-table discussions on a variety of issues.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Apr-2016
ORNL forges connections for sturgeon conservation
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are taking a closer look at how sturgeon, a prehistoric -- and now imperiled -- group of fish species may better be helped to get around the dams that block their migrations.

Contact: Ashanti B. Washington
news@ornl.gov
865-576-1946
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Apr-2016
Researchers discover new type of 'pili' used by bacteria to cling to hosts
Many bacteria interact with their environment through hair-like structures known as pili, which attach to and help mediate infection of host organisms, among other things. Now a US-Japanese research team, including scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has discovered that certain bacteria prevalent in the human gut and mouth assemble their pili in a previously unknown way -- information that could potentially open up new ways of fighting infection.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Apr-2016
NREL supports Native American tribes in clean energy transformational leadership
In the redwood country of northern California, where arboreal giants can live to be 2,000 years old and can reach heights of more than 375 feet, the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe has also grown something historic: a vision of climate sustainability and leadership.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Apr-2016
What are aerosols?
Art Sedlacek, an atmospheric scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has flown on planes outfitted with high tech equipment through wildfire plumes and over the ocean, and has visited stations all over the globe to observe aerosols and understand the potentially big impact these suspensions of tiny particles can have on climate.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

31-Mar-2016
Waste stream to energy source: What if America's next big fuel source is its trash?
National Laboratory researchers want to create energy conversion technologies designed to mine the carbon out of waste processes that traditionally have been an environmental burden to the planet.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

21-Mar-2016
Sisters in science
Emma and Molly White and Ru-Shyan and Ru-Huey Yen, a pair of twin sisters and close friends who met in high school 16 years ago. Flash forward to today, and the four all have science-based careers, and look back at their shared-sisterhood-times-two as vital in getting them to where they are today.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

14-Mar-2016
X-ray studies at SLAC and Berkeley Lab aid search for Ebola cure
In experiments carried out partly at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists have determined in atomic detail how a potential drug molecule fits into and blocks a channel in cell membranes that Ebola and related 'filoviruses' need to infect victims' cells.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Mar-2016
5 ways SLAC's X-ray laser can change the way we live
Here are five ways SLAC's X-ray laser and the science it enables can impact our future.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Mar-2016
Pushing boundaries
Solid-liquid interface studies have a long history at EMSL. The insights gained from this research spans areas including terrestrial ecosystems, energy materials, aerosols and biological systems. With improved understanding of interfacial events, scientists working at EMSL have developed more predictive models and made significant advances in addressing real-world challenges. EMSL's focus on solid-liquid interface research has pushed the development of new instruments and techniques to better study these complex surfaces for even greater scientific results.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

12-Feb-2016
AWARE project launched to gain new insights on climate of Antarctica
Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, working with a group led by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, embarked on a new project that will lead to a better understanding of how much of the sun's light and the atmosphere's heat radiation reach the Antarctic surface.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

29-Jan-2016
Meet Crysten and Ian Blaby
The US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory welcomes two new biologists, Crysten and Ian Blaby, who have been brought to the Lab to explore the many genes that play a role in a plant's ability to harness energy and what those genes could mean for enhancing bioenergy crops.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

4-Jan-2016
Q&A: Biologist describes milestone toward a universal flu vaccine
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Crucell Vaccine Institute have now designed a protein fragment called mini-HA that stimulates the production of antibodies against a variety of influenza viruses. A key part of the work took place at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a DOE Office of Science User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, where the scientists used a technique called X-ray crystallography to look at the atomic structure of the mini-HA at each stage of its development.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Dec-2015
2015's Top 10 Scientific Advances at Brookhaven National Laboratory
From creating the tiniest drops of primordial particle soup to devising new ways to improve batteries, catalysts, superconductors, and more, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory pushed the boundaries of discovery in 2015. Here, in no particular order, are our picks for the top 10 advances of the year.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

23-Dec-2015
Scratching the surface
Oceans cover almost three-quarters of the planet and are major contributors to atmospheric aerosols in the form of sea spray particles. These sea spray aerosols are rich in organic materials that impact cloud formation and the world's climate. Despite their abundance and significance, sea spray aerosols are not well understood. Researchers in collaboration with EMSL scientists are learning more about the chemistry of sea spray aerosols and their role in cloud formation to better account for them in climate models.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

21-Dec-2015
Study forecasts disappearance of conifers due to climate change
A new study, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory, suggests that widespread loss of a major forest type, the pine-juniper woodlands of the Southwestern US, could be wiped out by the end of this century due to climate change, and that conifers throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere may be on a similar trajectory.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

8-Dec-2015
Innovation boosts study of fragile biological samples at SLAC's X-ray laser
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have found a simple new way to study very delicate biological samples -- like proteins at work in photosynthesis and components of protein-making machines called ribosomes -- at the atomic scale using SLAC's X-ray laser.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Nov-2015
Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells
Every cell in the human body contains a copy of the human genome. Through the course of a lifetime all cells are thought to acquire mutations in their genomes. Some of the mutational processes generating these mutations do so in bursts and these will often be through external exposures such as sunbathing or tobacco smoking. Other mutational processes, however, may be internal to the cell and generate mutations continuously, at a constant rate over decades.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
Doe-Anderson

26-Oct-2015
The silent treatment: EMSL's quiet wing
Scientists are advancing the understanding of biological and environmental systems by conducting at least part of their research in EMSL's Quiet Wing, one of the most advanced quiet laboratories in the world for high-resolution imaging capabilities. Scientists are using this facility for a wide range of research areas, including: to study bacteria in complex soil aggregates, to understand the behavior of a unique multicopper oxidase and to explore remediation methods using porous clay.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

14-Oct-2015
X-ray study reveals new details of how burrowing sea creatures shape geology
Research at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory reveals new details about how tiny, burrowing sea organisms can influence the chemistry and structure of rocks where hydrocarbon deposits such as oil and gas are found.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Sep-2015
Building champions: National Science Bowl offseason
Five-time National Science Bowl champion Mira Loma HS keeps an intense -- and pizza fueled -- training regimen through the summer and fall.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

16-Sep-2015
Q&A: Biologist describes milestone in watching proteins boogie
Using an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have for the first time directly seen myoglobin move within quadrillionths of a second after a bond breaks and the protein releases a gas molecule. The Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser is a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and its short, bright pulses were essential for observing these ultrafast, atomic-scale motions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Sep-2015
Making the most from carbon in plants
Researchers are looking for more effective ways to get at all the carbon in biomass to create more energy and biochemicals. However, a lot of the carbon is in lignin -- support tissues in plants, which makes up about a third of the biomass. International teams of scientists are utilizing EMSL's expertise and capabilities to better understand how lignin can be efficiently deconstructed to release its carbon for a more renewable and sustainable energy future.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

1-Sep-2015
Time-lapse analysis offers new look at how cells repair DNA damage
Time-lapse imaging can make complicated processes easier to grasp. Berkeley Lab scientists are using a similar approach to study how cells repair DNA damage. Microscopy images are acquired about every thirty minutes over a span of up to two days, and the resulting sequence of images shows ever-changing hotspots inside cells where DNA is under repair.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 167 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

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