U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 101-125 out of 354 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

19-Aug-2005
In their hands: The future of particle physics
Particle physics is at a critical time, and its future depends on how well scientists can make their case to a diverse National Academy of Sciences panel.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

19-Aug-2005
The compact linear collider
As the Global Design Effort for the proposed International Linear Collider starts to take shape, an international collaboration of scientists simultaneously works on an alternative linear collider technology that pushes physics and engineering to the edge.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

8-Mar-2005
Letting the sunshine in
The outlook is sunny for the Laboratory's prospects of commercializing hybrid solar lighting (HSL). The ORNL technology uses sunlight to reduce the need for indoor electric lighting, the largest consumer of electricity in commercial buildings.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Mar-2005
New, nondestructive soil-analysis device measures carbon, more, in situ
With funding assistance from DOE's Office of Science and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Lucian Wielopolski of the Environmental Sciences Department (ES) has developed a device that can measure carbon and other elements in soils non-destructively and in situ.

Contact: Bulletin editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Feb-2005
Pacific Northwest lab forms Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, names director
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory today launched an $8 million Institute for Interfacial Catalysis to explore the fundamental chemical changes on surfaces where catalytic reactions take place. The Department of Energy lab also announced the appointment of University of Texas at Austin chemist John M. "Mike" White as the institute's director.

Contact: cannon@pnl.gov
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

22-Dec-2004
Detector technology aids in development of cystic fibrosis therapy
Studies in mice with a new imaging technique perfected by Jefferson Lab's Detector Group suggest that researchers at Case Western Reserve University may have found a way to replace the gene that causes cystic fibrosis.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Dec-2004
The Art of protein structure prediction
From hemoglobin that carries oxygen, to enzymes and hormones that turn cells on and off, to antibodies that fight infection, proteins seem to do it all.

Contact: Krzysztof Fidelis
fidelis1@llnl.gov
925-423-4752
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Piloting the pipeline
R pal. The automated pipeline. Mass spec and proteomics. These phrases are used by ORNL researchers who probe microbes to determine what these "bugs" are made of and what drives them.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Pathways underlying disorders
Abnormalities of the face and skull rank among the most common birth defects in humans. Understanding such complex human disorders requires a systems biology approach, according to Cymbeline Culiat, a molecular geneticist in ORNL's Life Sciences Division.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Sequencing the first tree genome
In 2004 researchers from around the world finished sequencing the complete genome of Populus, the first tree and the third plant to have its molecular "parts list" revealed.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
First, the questions
Scientists believe they are on the brink of solving some mysteries underlying the miracle of life.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
New tools of analysis
In the mid-1990s at Ohio State University, Dorothea Thompson studied a single gene and a single promoter regulating that gene as part of her doctoral thesis research.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Neutron-rich mecca for biologists
Biologists can image proteins using electron and atomic force microscopes. They can visualize the three-dimensional structure of proteins--amino-acid sequences folded in complicated ways--by using X rays at ORNL and other DOE labs.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Toxins and pathogens be warned
Imagine munching on a hamburger boldly knowing that it was not contaminated with E. coli or sipping a cold glass of water confident it was truly clean. Due to advances at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, these ideas may become a reality. A team of PNNL researchers is developing a method to detect contaminants in food, water and air supplies.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Shutting down genes in cancer, bacteria, and viruses
Ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference is a relatively new technique in which small molecules called short interfering RNA (siRNA) can be inserted into cells to turn off a chosen gene.

Contact: Allen Christian
christian4@llnl.gov
925-424-5909
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Detecting bioaerosols when time is of the essence
About seven years ago, Livermore researchers received seed funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program to develop an instrument that counters bioterrorism by providing a rapid early warning system for pathogens, such as anthrax.

Contact: Richard Langlois
langlois1@llnl.gov
925-422-5616
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
PNNL technology closes the 'lid' on Chevy Malibu Maxx
A technology first optimized at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been applied by General Motors to the liftgate of the 2004 Chevy Malibu Maxx.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
Pacific Northwest blazing big trail in small world
Last month's Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference in Portland brought together an amalgamation of national and international technology experts, with organizers hoping to convince them of a large future in the Pacific Northwest for tiny technology.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotractor' studies micro-scale friction
Interest in the development of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) has grown steadily during the past decade. These tiny devices, now used in such applications as auto airbag systems, inkjet printers, and display units, are attractive because they take up little space and require little or no assembly. They also are cheap to produce in batch quantities because they are made with a technology that is already mature -- the microlithography used to make silicon chips.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-844-9509
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotools' - Self-assembling durable nanocrystal arrays
A wish list for nanotechnologists would likely include a simple, inexpensive means of self-assembling nanocrystals into robust, orderly arrangements, like soup cans on a shelf or bricks in a wall, each separated from the next by an insulating layer of silicon dioxide.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

24-Aug-2004
Fine-tuning carbon nanotubes
Since their discovery in the 1990s, carbon nanotubes have ensnared the imagination of chemists. Among them are researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who are putting these fine filaments--ten-thousand times smaller than a hair--to work as biosensors and improving the way carbon nanotubes can be chemically customized to form the basis for a wide variety of devices.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Mercury—watch out!
An innovative sponge-like material that can "absorb" more than half its weight in contaminants from waste streams has been developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Nanoparticles may mean longer life for enzymes
The biochemical world's workaholic is the enzyme. Enzymes are molecules in cells that lead short, active and brutal lives. They restlessly catalyze their neighbors, cleaving and assembling proteins and metabolizing compounds. After a few hours of furious activity, they are what chemists call "destabilized," or spent.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Thin films enable next-generation displays
You've finished working on your computer and you're ready to call it a day. Instead of logging off and folding the screen down over a laptop keyboard, imagine rolling up the computer screen and stashing it in your bag. Roll-up computer screens and other flexible light-emitting displays that conform to almost any shape or surface may one day be realities thanks to a team of scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 101-125 out of 354 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map