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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 126-150 out of 355 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

24-Aug-2004
Thin films enable next-generation displays
You've finished working on your computer and you're ready to call it a day. Instead of logging off and folding the screen down over a laptop keyboard, imagine rolling up the computer screen and stashing it in your bag. Roll-up computer screens and other flexible light-emitting displays that conform to almost any shape or surface may one day be realities thanks to a team of scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Supercritical fluids—making nanoparticles easy
It's not a liquid. It's not a gas. It's a supercritical fluid. Although it looks like a liquid, it has unique properties that allow scientists to work with it in ways they can't with liquids. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using supercritical fluids as solvents in a process that creates nanoparticles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Making light of it
A cadre of researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is laying the groundwork for success with the most promising new lighting technology to emerge since liquid crystal displays (LCD).

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
From cosmetics to hydrogen storage—nanoscale materials push the frontier
Suresh Baskaran develops new projects in advanced materials and manufacturing technology. This includes materials and manufacturing technology for new applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion, vehicular structures, sensors and emissions control.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
PNNL co-leads Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, will lead a new national Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The new center is a step toward a "hydrogen economy"--an economy based not on the fossil fuels we use today, but on clean, abundant hydrogen fuels. It is one of three Department of Energy "Centers of Excellence" aimed at enabling use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Rest easy—it's safe and secure
The desk is cleared, the computer is off, and the weekend lies ahead-hit the lights and you are out the door. Not fifteen minutes later you begin to question whether you locked the safe where you store your classified materials--sound familiar? Even the most diligent and security minded personnel have at some time experienced this absent-minded professor syndrome.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Reading, writing and nanoscience?
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has opened its doors to scholars of nanoscience by hosting the new "Intensive Courses in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology." Billed as one of science's hottest and most rapidly evolving fields, nanoscience involves the study of materials and their properties at the molecular level.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Safe harbors in stormy waters
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's expertise in border control training is being tapped to support the Megaports Initiative, a government program aimed at preventing terrorism.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Glimpses of global warming
As greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere, many questions arise concerning how fast and in what ways Earth's environment will change. For example, in the United States, will increased emissions of carbon dioxide from coal combustion in the 21 st century make the Southeast wetter or drier over the next 100 years? Will changes in temperature and moisture conditions make certain U.S. regions more vulnerable to insect-borne diseases?

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Uncovering secrets of living cells
Probing microbes to determine what they are made of and what drives them requires more than mass spectrometers, microarrays, and microscopes. Computational models run on supercomputers have been key contributors to our growing understanding of these single-cell organisms.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Helping water managers ensure clean and reliable supplies
MOST Americans take cheap and plentiful supplies of pure drinking water for granted. Some even consider it to be an inalienable right. However, clean water sources, especially pristine underground aquifers, are being consumed at an increasing rate, and contaminants and changing patterns in rain and snowfall are threatening the adequacy of supplies.

Contact: Robin Newmark
newmark1@llnl.gov
925-423-3644
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2-Jun-2004
Future space scientists train at Brookhaven Lab
As astronauts spend more time in space, scientists need to better understand the dangers space travelers face from deep-space radiation -- and how to best shield them against these risks. A new NASA Summer Student Program at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory will help provide a "pipeline" of researchers to tackle this challenge. The program begins June 1, 2004

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Agricultural biosecurity taking on increased importance
Our current agricultural food safety and security programs have provided the citizens of the U.S. the safest food production system the world has ever seen. But these programs were not designed to identify or respond to intentional acts of bioterrorism using either conventional or unconventional biological agents to contaminate our food or food processing/distribution system.

Contact: Michelle Fleming
meflemi@sandia.gov
505-844-4902
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2004
SARS foam- Sandia foams fight SARS virus
In a series of tests conducted at Kansas State University on Bovine coronavirus (BCV) -- the internationally accepted surrogate for the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus -- Sandia versions of its DF- 200 formulation fully inactivated samples in one minute or less.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

6-May-2004
Brookhaven-developed recyclable catalyst may help to reduce hazardous industrial waste
Brookhaven chemists have developed a new, "green" catalyst -- one that converts chemical reactants into usable products without producing waste.

Contact: Morris Bullock
bullock@bnl.gov
631-344-4315
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
Engine shows diesel efficiency without the emissions
Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced harmful emissions.

Contact: Salvador Aceves
aceves6@llnl.gov
925-422-0864
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
On the front lines of biodefense
The Laboratory's pathogen bioinformatics group is developing ways to rapidly identify microbes that could pose a threat to the nation's citizens, livestock, and crops.

Contact: Thomas Slezak
slezak1@llnl.gov
925-422-5746
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Mar-2004
DOE scientists sample the skies
This summer, scientists from the DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will be participating in the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICART2) experiment, an effort to understand how pollutants from the Northeastern U.S. affect climate and air quality as they spread over the North Atlantic Ocean.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Mar-2004
Markowitz tapped for Joint Genome Institute Chief Informatics Officer
The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) today (March 15) announced that Victor M. Markowitz, D.Sc., has been appointed to the newly created position of Chief Informatics Officer.

Contact: David E. Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

3-Mar-2004
Just say 'no' to adenovirus
Description of research on adenovirus at Brookhaven National Laboratory suggesting that nitric oxide might work as an antiviral agent.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Spectral library sheds light on chemicals
A chemical's "John Hancock" can give it away. Just as a person's signature is unique and a sure way to weed out imposters and arrive at the truth, a chemical's spectral signature is a trustworthy form of identification. And such revealing information is becoming ever more vital in a world where detection of toxic substances could save lives and the environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
N4 links regional nanoscience and nanotechnology efforts
The Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network--or N4--is magnifying communication about nano-related research in the Pacific Northwest region.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
PNNL and NASA team on fuel cell research
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the NASA Glenn Research Center will collaborate in solving one of the toughest technical challenges to the development of advanced solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The two research organizations have signed a Space Act Agreement to team on the development of sealing technologies for the stacks of SOFCs.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 126-150 out of 355 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

 

 

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