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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 151-175 out of 355 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

18-Feb-2004
A genetic sleight-of-wing
Ecologists have come to rely on a tiny fly called the midge as an environmental sentinel--an entomological canary-in-a-coal-mine for rivers. They have learned that a variety of midge species thrive in healthy streams, whereas in polluted water, like that near a lead mine, midge species can dwindle to nothing. So by skimming the skins that pupating midges shed as they enter adulthood, ecologists can attain a cheap snapshot of a stream's living conditions.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Linking environmental issues leads to expanded views
Dr. Marburger sets out a formidable challenge--one that requires fundamental change in the purpose and scope of environmental science. Cleanup isn't enough; we must take a far more proactive view of environmental issues, one that considers the intricate network of ramifications that decisions, missions and activities have on each other and the environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Cleaning up energy production
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are playing a lead role on a combined Department of Energy and industry effort to build a 275-megawatt coal-fired plant that will gasify coal to produce electricity and hydrogen. In that gasification process, carbon dioxide would be captured and sequestered.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Energy moves in new directions
Meeting our needs with cleaner, more efficient energy is absolutely critical to our quality of life. It helps provide for the continued prosperity of the United States as well as helping raise the standard of living in the rest of the world. Energy is important to global and national security and is at the core of DOE's mission.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Bringing data to light
Being able to find the "needle" of information in a "haystack" of millions of words is a capability with many beneficial uses, particularly to secure the homeland. For more than three decades, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an array of information visualization tools to help find that crucial needle in the haystack.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2004
Systems biologists—modern-day Lewis and Clark
I compare PNNL's work with biological systems to the work of explorers--and settlers. We are like the explorers who set out to discover distant places, paving the way for the pioneers who settled them. In traditional biology, we have almost finished cataloging the different parts of living organisms and now we want to integrate what we know. We're ready to build the infrastructure we need to settle certain biological areas.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Science and technology on the front line against terrorism
Winning the war on terrorism and securing the homeland will require innovative science and technology solutions. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is in an excellent position to develop science and technology for strengthening America's ability to defend itself against terrorism.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Advances bring new zest to biological research
The late U.S. President Herbert Hoover once remarked, "New discoveries in science...will continue to create a thousand new frontiers for those who would still adventure." Though we have witnessed significant advances in science and technology, there is much to discover. Each new understanding prompts new questions and challenges.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
One person's garbage is another's power
The Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., has turned to the garbage dump to power its operations. One hundred percent of MSL's electrical energy needs now are supplied by "green power" provided by methane gas from a sanitary waste landfill. Green power refers to environmentally preferred power, generated by resources regarded as having certain environmental benefits--such as wind, solar and geothermal.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
PNNL wins record grant for proteomics center
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has won a five-year, $10.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support a center for basic research in proteomics. This is the largest NIH award in PNNL's 38-year history.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
X-rays reveal the structure of proteins
Biologists are using the newest biological detective devices to determine the structures of proteins and provide insight into the details of life from cell communication to gene activation.

Contact: Elelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Parallel computers 'evolutionize' research
A major research trend is harnessing advanced computers to complement theory and experiment. Advanced computing allows scientists to conduct experiments that could not otherwise be done, to test possible experiments before investing the time and money to physically carry them out, and to create models of complex phenomena.

Contact: David Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Brookhaven develops science-based solutions to national homeland-security issues
From safeguarding fissile materials to developing technology for detection of nuclear weapons, dirty bombs, toxic chemicals, biological pathogens, and conventional explosives, Brookhaven's homeland-security initiatives are focused on protecting the New York metropolitan area and our nation from future terrorist attacks.

Contact: Joseph Indusi
indusi@bnl.gov
631-344-2975
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Nov-2003
Finding DNA gold in a genetic desert
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Joint Genome Institute have discovered the existence of DNA sequences--located in genetic "deserts"--that regulate gene activation over very long distances. Previously, sequences in these deserts were thought to be of no value and were thus largely unexplored. Results of this research are reported in the October 17, 2003, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Nov-2003
Military extends 'protect and defend' motto to the ecosystem
Experts in hydrology, soils, remote sensing and wildlife habitat analysis from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing technologies that will help the U.S. Army's Yakima Training Center assess how military training exercises impact the site's arid ecosystem and make decisions about land use. The YTC is located in Washington state.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Nov-2003
Science, technology and America's military in the 21st century
PNNL capabilities are supporting the armed forces in a time of change.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

4-Nov-2003
Researchers help county balance water and growth equation
Population growth in a city or county often is a sign of health--a positive reflection of a region's economic, social, environmental and other "quality of life" features. But for many municipalities, maintaining a healthy balance between regional growth and natural resource management is increasingly difficult.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

4-Nov-2003
PNNL focuses on the hydrogen economy
It appears the hydrogen economy is coming, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will be helping to fuel it.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

4-Nov-2003
An interview with the director
Dr. Leonard Peters joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as director on April 1, 2003. Outgoing and affable, Peters insists that new acquaintances refer to him simply as "Len." His leadership style is similarly direct and free of pretense. We recently visited with Len to see how he is settling into his new role and to gain a better understanding of his vision for PNNL.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Sep-2003
Supernovae shape up for cosmology
A collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the European Southern Observatory, and the University of Texas has yielded the discovery that Type 1a supernovae do not explode spherically. This discovery marks the first time that the intrinsic polarization of a normal Type 1a supernova has been detected.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

15-Aug-2003
Plant fertility research benefits from discovery of molecular signaling system
University of Chicago researchers have discovered that gamma-amino butyric acid plays a crucial role in plant reproduction. This research is important to the agriculture industry--which provides 80 percent of the world's food supply--and has broad implications for cell-to-cell interactions and signaling in plant and animal systems. The research, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, is reported in the July 11, 2003, issue of Cell.

Contact: John Easton
jeaston@uchospitals.edu
773-702-6241
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Aug-2003
Microfluidic device rapidly captures and releases proteins
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory have developed a microdevice that can easily collect and release proteins in aqueous solution in under a second. The small, portable prototype device shows promise in the biotechnology arena, with capabilities targeted at near-instantaneous analysis of suspect proteins and compatibility with hand-held sensors. This microfluidic device is discussed in the July 18, 2003, issue of Science.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

14-Jul-2003
Sea salt study provides better understanding of climate modeling
A recent study by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of California, Irvine, has provided a new understanding of sea salt's role in atmospheric chemistry. This study--focusing on sulfur dioxide and its conversion to sulfuric acid in air--will allow scientists to more accurately predict and capture information in models related to regional or global warming. Results of the study are reported in the July 3, 2003, issue of Science Express.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Researchers help computing reach its full potential
It didn't take long for computers to turn typewriters, manual cash registers and similar devices into artifacts. Today, with everything from laptops to massive supercomputing capabilities, people have access to tools that perform complex tasks in a matter of seconds, saving vast amounts of time and money.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
MSL's fungal work leads to new research directions
Some people view fungi as mere mold-- a nuisance. Many, however, see great potential in these unique organisms. PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., possesses a rich history of fungi-related research and a collection of more than 200 strains of fungal species, some of which have been developed to perform environmental remediation and other tasks.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 151-175 out of 355 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

 

 

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