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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 176-200 out of 361 stories.
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24-Sep-2003
Supernovae shape up for cosmology
A collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the European Southern Observatory, and the University of Texas has yielded the discovery that Type 1a supernovae do not explode spherically. This discovery marks the first time that the intrinsic polarization of a normal Type 1a supernova has been detected.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

15-Aug-2003
Plant fertility research benefits from discovery of molecular signaling system
University of Chicago researchers have discovered that gamma-amino butyric acid plays a crucial role in plant reproduction. This research is important to the agriculture industry--which provides 80 percent of the world's food supply--and has broad implications for cell-to-cell interactions and signaling in plant and animal systems. The research, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, is reported in the July 11, 2003, issue of Cell.

Contact: John Easton
jeaston@uchospitals.edu
773-702-6241
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Aug-2003
Microfluidic device rapidly captures and releases proteins
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory have developed a microdevice that can easily collect and release proteins in aqueous solution in under a second. The small, portable prototype device shows promise in the biotechnology arena, with capabilities targeted at near-instantaneous analysis of suspect proteins and compatibility with hand-held sensors. This microfluidic device is discussed in the July 18, 2003, issue of Science.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

14-Jul-2003
Sea salt study provides better understanding of climate modeling
A recent study by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of California, Irvine, has provided a new understanding of sea salt's role in atmospheric chemistry. This study--focusing on sulfur dioxide and its conversion to sulfuric acid in air--will allow scientists to more accurately predict and capture information in models related to regional or global warming. Results of the study are reported in the July 3, 2003, issue of Science Express.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Researchers help computing reach its full potential
It didn't take long for computers to turn typewriters, manual cash registers and similar devices into artifacts. Today, with everything from laptops to massive supercomputing capabilities, people have access to tools that perform complex tasks in a matter of seconds, saving vast amounts of time and money.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
MSL's fungal work leads to new research directions
Some people view fungi as mere mold-- a nuisance. Many, however, see great potential in these unique organisms. PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., possesses a rich history of fungi-related research and a collection of more than 200 strains of fungal species, some of which have been developed to perform environmental remediation and other tasks.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Measuring aquatic vegetation goes high-tech
Using people to manually characterize aquatic vegetation in the coastal environment may no longer be the best method of capturing features in a marine environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
It's not raining cats anymore
The mystery of why panthers were dropping dead from the trees in the Florida Everglades was solved fairly quickly. The mystery of how they were being poisoned with mercury took a little longer. Scientists from PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory were part of a team of researchers involved with the initial assessment of mercury contamination in the Florida Everglades project between 1993 and 2000.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
MSL's approach to eelgrass is spreading
More than 60 percent of the world's population lives near the coast. In addition to the growing development and economic importance of coastal areas, there is a major push for maintaining and restoring coastal ecosystems.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Culvert technology may help young salmon muscle their way upstream
Tens of thousands of culverts lie beneath roads in the Pacific Northwest, successfully moving water under the roadbed to preserve pavement and prevent flooding. At the same time, many are blocking juvenile salmon from migrating upstream to the habitat they need to survive and grow.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Jaws IV: Algae takes on CO2
Billions of tons of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel-fired power plants are pumped into the air each day, contributing to global warming. Scientists at PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., are looking at marine algae as a solution to global warming caused by carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Photosynthesis shines as remediation tool
Marine construction, wood treatment, agricultural chemical production, chlorine production-- for decades we have been dumping waste into our harbors, many of which are now considered some of the most contaminated hazardous waste sites in the United States. Battelle researchers at PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory have developed a promising technique for remediating contaminated sediments in seawater and freshwater ecosystems.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Short-term estrogen exposure cuts fish fertility
A new study by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Idaho shows that exposure to estrogen affects adult fish as they swim through rivers, lakes and streams to spawn. The study suggests that when adult male fish are exposed to short-term and low concentrations of synthetic estrogen, their fertility can drop by as much as 50 percent.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Marine Sciences Laboratory -a prized resource- expands capabilities
Renewed interest in homeland security, continued need for environmental solutions and a growing market for industrial products have made Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Wash., a focal point for developing new capabilities. Nestled in the quiet harbor of Sequim Bay on the Olympic Peninsula, MSL was established in 1967 and features state-of-the-art facilities. Over the years, MSL staff have conducted advanced research aimed at preserving and protecting the coastal and marine environment.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Proteomics research at home at PNNL
Proteomics, the study of proteins in living organisms, is one of the next major frontiers for the scientific community--and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will play a significant role in unlocking the mysteries of proteins. Through its newly established Prototype Sample Processing and Proteomics Facility, PNNL will help pave the way to eliminating diseases such as muscular dystrophy and for creating targeted drugs.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
New product offers alternative to toxic deicers
With the U.S. military using nearly 3 million gallons of toxic glycol-based deicer a year in addition to the nearly 30 million gallons of aircraft deicing fluid commercial airlines use, the U.S. Department of Defense looked to Battelle for a more environmentally friendly solution to deice aircraft. Working together, Battelle researchers at PNNL and Columbus, Ohio, developed a safe, biodegradable, nonglycol based product--Degradable by Design DeicerTM or D3.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Regional program touts cooperation for economic growth
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Office of Northwest Regional Programs (ONRP) is emphasizing cooperation as a way to energize economic development efforts in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Tiny technology offers potent solution for military, industry
Researchers, with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, have developed a potentially high-energy microscale power system that can be used as an alternative to conventional batteries for microelectronic devices crucial to America's military troops.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
No more free ride for phytoplankton
They may not be terrorists, but they can be sneaky--phytoplankton. These single-celled algae can sneak into nonindigenous harbors and coastal waters via ships' ballast water. Toxins from the phytoplankton can be taken up by shellfish and become harmful to humans who consume the shellfish.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-May-2003
EMSL generates impact beyond fundamental science
The research conducted at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) does more than contribute to a basic understanding of the world around us. It also helps to improve the environment, ensure national security, advance health care, and promote clean energy through real-world applications. The following research projects demonstrate the diversity of EMSL's scientific contributions.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

19-May-2003
Secrets of drug resistance revealed
Scientists from the DOE Office of Science's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have obtained high-resolution images that offer insight on how bacteria survive attacks from antibiotics. The images were published in the May 9, 2003, issue of Science.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

12-May-2003
From corn fiber to consumer products—New process captures valuable components
The National Corn Growers Association and Archer Daniels Midland Company have partnered with the DOE Office of Science's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a process for extracting important components from corn fiber. Such components are instrumental in developing products like fuel ethanol, plastics, polyester, and personal care products.

Contact: Geoff Harvey
Geoffrey.Harvey@pnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

28-Apr-2003
Phylogenetic shadowing: Apes and monkeys are helping scientists to understand the human genome
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique called "phylogenetic shadowing" that helped them identify a gene, found only in primates, that indicates the risk of heart disease.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
LCYarris@lbl.gov
510-486-6641
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

16-Apr-2003
Modeling bone remodeling
Los Alamos theoreticians are using algorithms developed in weapons research to understand bone dynamics and abnormalities like osteoporosis.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

12-Apr-2003
Building on the DNA revolution
A special section of the April 11 issue of Science--Building on the DNA Revolution--features two articles on the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science participation in the Human Genome Project and future directions--the Genomes to Life project.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
Jeff.Sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-4826
DOE/US Department of Energy

Showing stories 176-200 out of 361 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

 

 

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