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Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 350 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

30-Sep-2002
Byproducts and biomass fuel new opportunities
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to transform low-value biomass such as corn fiber, mill feed and livestock waste into specialty chemicals, or high value bioproducts, such as plastics, fibers, adhesives and solvents. These bioproducts often can be made less expensively than the same products made from petroleum using processes that are more energy efficient and environmentally friendly.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Security technologies meet the needs of industry
A device that identifies contents in sealed containers and a system that can diagnose engine problems while the equipment is operating are among several innovative technologies developed for national security applications and moved into the marketplace by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PNNL conducts scientific research in energy, the environment, national security, information technology and health, making an effort to commercialize technologies so they can help solve critical problems for industry and society.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Cooking up a better cathode
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing new cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Their goal is to find a cathode material that will produce high power in the range of 600 to 800 degrees Celsius--low compared to the more typical SOFC operating temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

10-Sep-2002
A thousand years of climate change
Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have just completed a 1,000-year run of a powerful new climate system model on a supercomputer at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2-Sep-2002
Breakthrough mass spectrometry technology
A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed new instrumentation and a unique approach to obtain the most complete protein analysis of any organism to date. Results were published in the August 20, 2002, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
The color of genomes
New visualization techniques developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory allow researchers to compare and analyze genomes using a powerful tool that computers cannot replace--the human brain.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Sensor Fish gets redesign
The Sensor Fish--originally packed into a six-inch-long rubbery fish shape nicknamed "flubber fish," this data collection device later resurfaced in the shape of a juvenile fish sized plastic tube. Both the original and the tube-shaped Sensor Fish employed computer electronics to measure the pressure and acceleration changes salmon smolts experience in the severe turbulence that forms the hydraulic environment of hydroelectric dams as they migrate down the Columbia River.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Paving the way for proteomics
A field of study that is only about five years old is beginning to blossom at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Proteomics is the systematic study of patterns of proteins expressed in living organisms.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Biology research goes in silico
Long before a new jumbo jet takes off the runway, all of its systems and subsystems down to the tiniest of individual parts have been virtually designed, built and tested through the use of computer models and simulations. Similarly, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing virtual cells that can be explored, tested and manipulated within the world of computers to make important discoveries in systems biology.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Seeing cells in a whole new way
Steve Colson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory uses a quote from Aristotle to describe the role of PNNL's Cellular Observatory. Colson leads the Cellular Observatory, the Laboratory's effort to provide advances in imaging tools needed for a systems biology approach to molecular and cellular biology. Eventually, these tools could help enable biological solutions to challenges in energy production and use, carbon management, bioremediation and bioterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Super-Shewanella
Introducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a versatile bacterium that scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying in the Microbial Cell Project as a potential biological solution to Department of Energy sites contaminated during the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Fast glass!
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center have developed a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste. Vitrification is a process that combines concentrated radioactive waste with glass-forming materials.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Climate monitoring goes mobile
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists now have the capability to document atmospheric and climate change at locations nearly anywhere in the world, thanks to a new mobile atmospheric monitoring system developed at the Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jul-2002
Designer molecules set the trend for advancing science
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing computational tools to rapidly design and build new molecular structures and screen them before synthesizing the real molecule. The power of this approach is illustrated in the April 26, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Mary Ace
mary.ace@pnl.gov
509-372-4277
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Jul-2002
Air quality study focuses on New England
In an effort to identify why the Northeastern US has some of the worst air quality in the country, NOAA's largest research vessel, along with the Department of Energy's Gulfstream research aircraft, will monitor air pollutants and their transport in the region this summer.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Jul-2002
Global climate change research at Brookhaven
BNL scientists are simulating the atmosphere of the mid-21st century to see how increased levels of carbon dioxide and other trace gases may affect various ecosystems.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-Jun-2002
DNA repair process revealed
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory see a vivid picture of the DNA repair process using single-molecule spectroscopy.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

6-Jun-2002
DOE's Office of Science sponsors 2001 National Medal of Science winners
Fourteen scientists and one engineer will be awarded the National Medal of Science at the White House on June 13, 2002. Eight of these premier researchers are currently funded or have received funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science during their careers.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.Sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-4826
DOE/US Department of Energy

31-May-2002
Forensic science center maximizes the tiniest clue
Lawrence Livermore's Forensic Science Center combination of human and technological resources has made it among the best of its kind for collecting and analyzing virtually any kind of evidence, some of it no larger than a few billionths of a gram. Its resources, expertise, tools, and techniques are applied to all kinds of cases, from the September 11 World Trade Center attack to the spread of anthrax spores, from multiple homicides to nuclear materials smuggling.

Contact: Brian Andresen
andresen1@llnl.gov
925-422-0903
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-May-2002
Mapping the microbial world
Scientists are cataloguing and mapping the life inside Yellowstone’s hot pools. Hardy microorganisms ranging from emerald-green bacteria to fire-red rock slime have long fascinated microbiologists with their ability to live in the scalding hot water at Yellowstone National Park, the acidic ore deposits of abandoned mines or the salt pools of the Great Salt Lake.

Contact: Daphne Stoner
dstoner@inel.gov
208-526-8786
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

27-May-2002
The Milano mutation: A rare protein mutation offers new hope for heart disease patients
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered the mechanism by which an extremely rare protein mutation shields people from cardiovascular disease. The discovery could lead to more potent drug therapies that target both cholesterol deposition and prevent future accumulation. Results were reported in the February 12, 2002, issue of the journal Biochemistry.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-May-2002
Small effects are key to how materials evolve
Fundamental research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Lab shows that subtle variations in certain properties control how microstructures form. This basic research effort may one day allow scientists to tailor microstructural development, providing the basis for new and improved materials.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

20-May-2002
HERPES database online
To aid in the search for cures and vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a publicly available Web database containing the Human herpesvirus 2 genomic sequence.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 350 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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