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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 361 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

3-Apr-2003
Los Alamos' 60th anniversary
As it turns 60 years old, Los Alamos National Laboratory holds a special place in the modern-day genealogy of science and technology, says George "Pete" Nanos, the laboratory's interim director. "We are proud of our accomplishments. However, we will never rest on our laurels or be held motionless by the past."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Dec-2002
Closing in on cancer
Gerald Small, an Ames Lab senior chemist and an Iowa State University distinguished professor, and Ryszard Jankowiak, an Ames Lab senior scientist, have developed a unique biosensor technology that provides immediate information about DNA damage from cancer-causing pollutants called carcinogens. Damage to DNA, which carries the genetic code of life, is a critical first step in the development of cancer.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

23-Dec-2002
Sea squirt DNA sheds light on vertebrate evolution
A study of the genome of Ciona intestinalis - the sea squirt - by an international consortium of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute has yielded new insights into the origins of complex biological systems. Results are reported in the December 13, 2002, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Charles Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

19-Dec-2002
2002: A big year for accomplishments at Los Alamos
In the tradition of "years in review" published nearly everywhere, John Browne, director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has published a sampling of technical accomplishments at this Department of Energy lab during 2002.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Nov-2002
Scientists identify role of important cancer protein
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Synchrotron Light Source located at Brookhaven National Laboratory have uncovered how a known cancer protein disrupts the normal function of human cells. This discovery, which may lead to the design of new anticancer drugs, is reported in the November 1, 2002, issue of the journal Cell.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

4-Nov-2002
Taking structural biology to a new plateau
As part of a new multidisciplinary structural biology program, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory unexpectedly discovered a protein interface they call the Rad50 "zinc hook," used by an essential protein complex to link broken DNA strands. These first results from the new program were published in the August 1, 2002, issue of Nature.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Oct-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracing biothreats with molecular signatures
For more than a decade, a team of researchers in the DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division has been working to prevent the proliferation of biological weapons. The team has developed a powerful set of tools and techniques for deciphering molecular signatures genetic patterns that distinguish bacterial species and strains.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Detecting and monitoring harmful algal blooms
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., are working with the Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom (ORHAB) project to investigate the mechanisms driving harmful algal blooms. Harmful algal blooms (HABs), a common occurrence on the Washington coast, have led to closures of commercial, tribal and recreational shellfish harvest, which have resulted in millions of dollars in losses to the state's razor clam fishery in recent years.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Something fishy?
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are analyzing fish from about 500 randomly selected lakes and reservoirs across the country for ultra-low, trace levels of mercury and for specific forms of arsenic. The project, part of the National Fish Monitoring Study, is focused on freshwater game fish, such as lake trout, and bottom-dwelling fish, such as catfish.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Fuel cells for transportation
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing fuel cells that use a vehicle's existing fuel supply to provide auxiliary power for creature comforts, such as air-conditioning, keeping drinks cold in mini-refrigerators and viewing DVDs--all without running the vehicle's engine or draining its battery.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
New anode material bodes well
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist Olga Marina is developing a new generation of non-metallic anodes for solid oxide fuel cells and she is seeing promising results. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, her work is part of a significant international research effort to identify alternatives to nickel in solid oxide fuel cells.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Byproducts and biomass fuel new opportunities
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to transform low-value biomass such as corn fiber, mill feed and livestock waste into specialty chemicals, or high value bioproducts, such as plastics, fibers, adhesives and solvents. These bioproducts often can be made less expensively than the same products made from petroleum using processes that are more energy efficient and environmentally friendly.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Security technologies meet the needs of industry
A device that identifies contents in sealed containers and a system that can diagnose engine problems while the equipment is operating are among several innovative technologies developed for national security applications and moved into the marketplace by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PNNL conducts scientific research in energy, the environment, national security, information technology and health, making an effort to commercialize technologies so they can help solve critical problems for industry and society.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Cooking up a better cathode
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing new cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Their goal is to find a cathode material that will produce high power in the range of 600 to 800 degrees Celsius--low compared to the more typical SOFC operating temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

10-Sep-2002
A thousand years of climate change
Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have just completed a 1,000-year run of a powerful new climate system model on a supercomputer at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2-Sep-2002
Breakthrough mass spectrometry technology
A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed new instrumentation and a unique approach to obtain the most complete protein analysis of any organism to date. Results were published in the August 20, 2002, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
The color of genomes
New visualization techniques developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory allow researchers to compare and analyze genomes using a powerful tool that computers cannot replace--the human brain.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Sensor Fish gets redesign
The Sensor Fish--originally packed into a six-inch-long rubbery fish shape nicknamed "flubber fish," this data collection device later resurfaced in the shape of a juvenile fish sized plastic tube. Both the original and the tube-shaped Sensor Fish employed computer electronics to measure the pressure and acceleration changes salmon smolts experience in the severe turbulence that forms the hydraulic environment of hydroelectric dams as they migrate down the Columbia River.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Paving the way for proteomics
A field of study that is only about five years old is beginning to blossom at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Proteomics is the systematic study of patterns of proteins expressed in living organisms.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Biology research goes in silico
Long before a new jumbo jet takes off the runway, all of its systems and subsystems down to the tiniest of individual parts have been virtually designed, built and tested through the use of computer models and simulations. Similarly, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing virtual cells that can be explored, tested and manipulated within the world of computers to make important discoveries in systems biology.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Seeing cells in a whole new way
Steve Colson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory uses a quote from Aristotle to describe the role of PNNL's Cellular Observatory. Colson leads the Cellular Observatory, the Laboratory's effort to provide advances in imaging tools needed for a systems biology approach to molecular and cellular biology. Eventually, these tools could help enable biological solutions to challenges in energy production and use, carbon management, bioremediation and bioterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Super-Shewanella
Introducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a versatile bacterium that scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying in the Microbial Cell Project as a potential biological solution to Department of Energy sites contaminated during the manufacture of nuclear weapons.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Fast glass!
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center have developed a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste. Vitrification is a process that combines concentrated radioactive waste with glass-forming materials.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 361 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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