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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 226-250 out of 354 stories.
<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

31-May-2002
Mapping the microbial world
Scientists are cataloguing and mapping the life inside Yellowstone’s hot pools. Hardy microorganisms ranging from emerald-green bacteria to fire-red rock slime have long fascinated microbiologists with their ability to live in the scalding hot water at Yellowstone National Park, the acidic ore deposits of abandoned mines or the salt pools of the Great Salt Lake.

Contact: Daphne Stoner
dstoner@inel.gov
208-526-8786
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

27-May-2002
The Milano mutation: A rare protein mutation offers new hope for heart disease patients
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered the mechanism by which an extremely rare protein mutation shields people from cardiovascular disease. The discovery could lead to more potent drug therapies that target both cholesterol deposition and prevent future accumulation. Results were reported in the February 12, 2002, issue of the journal Biochemistry.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-May-2002
Small effects are key to how materials evolve
Fundamental research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Lab shows that subtle variations in certain properties control how microstructures form. This basic research effort may one day allow scientists to tailor microstructural development, providing the basis for new and improved materials.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

20-May-2002
HERPES database online
To aid in the search for cures and vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a publicly available Web database containing the Human herpesvirus 2 genomic sequence.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracking the identity and origin of biological threats
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northern Arizona University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed sophisticated tools to analyze and identify the DNA of biological threat agents, including those that cause anthrax and plague.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

6-May-2002
Molecular shuttling
The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory researchers observed molecular shuttling on a man-made membrane that mimics cellular behavior. Recurring movements may evolve into rudimentary tools of nanoconstruction. These observations were published as the cover story in the April 30, 2002, issue of the chemical and biophysics journal Langmuir.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

6-May-2002
Looking for clues about how proteins talk to each other
Physicists at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveal that interactions among proteins at the cellular level are not random, but well organized. The results of this study are published in the May 3, 2002, issue of Science.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Probing cells by computer
A computational analysis of human and bacterial genomes by ORNL researchers provides insights into what our genes do. ORNL researchers will soon be predicting 100 protein structures a day and evaluating which compounds could make highly effective therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
A National resource at ORNL
Supercomputers at ORNL are enabling scientists in a number of fields to make discoveries that could not be made through either theoretical or experimental research.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL, IBM, and the Blue Gene Project
ORNL is working with IBM to develop the Blue Gene supercomputer for relating protein shapes to disease.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Mar-2002
Tracking down virulence in plague
How do the plague pathogen and its host interact? Scientists will apply the answer to understanding a larger set of possible agents of biological terrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

6-Mar-2002
New projects to explore 'breakthrough' ideas for capturing, storing carbon gases
As part of its efforts to develop "breakthrough" approaches for reducing the threat of global climate change, the Department has added three new projects to develop ways to capture carbon dioxide released from power plants and safely prevent it from entering the atmosphere.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

3-Mar-2002
Atmospheric aerosols found to brighten clouds
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Purdue University combine satellite data with model calculations to study whether atmospheric aerosols increase the brightness of clouds enough to have a potential impact on climate. Higher reflectivity of brighter clouds may result in global cooling, partially offsetting the greenhouse effect. The Brookhaven-Purdue study was reported in the February 19, 2002 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
L-Gel decontaminates better than bleach
Scientists have developed a material that is safe for people and the environment but deadly to the agents of biological and chemical warfare.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Giving an EDGE to sustainable design
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed tools for sustainable design, a term that describes a systematic approach to ensuring that facilities, products and processes are addressing the "triple bottom line" - the environment, economics and social equity.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Modernizing the military
From software to identification systems, diagnostics to emergency management, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed technologies that could support the military as it moves into the 21st century.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Border training helps reduce dangerous smuggling
A joint program between the U.S. Customs Service and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides training to foreign border guards, customs patrol and frontier police on how to spot red flags that should trigger a search, as well as how to use specialized technology to detect and identify items used to make nuclear, chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic components—lipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
International effort to sequence the first tree genome
Cottonwoods, hybrid poplars, and aspens could play a role in improving the environment, displacing imported oil and creating domestic jobs, but first scientists from the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and around the world must sequence the Populus genome.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 226-250 out of 354 stories.
<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

 

 

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