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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 251-275 out of 361 stories.
<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic components—lipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
International effort to sequence the first tree genome
Cottonwoods, hybrid poplars, and aspens could play a role in improving the environment, displacing imported oil and creating domestic jobs, but first scientists from the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and around the world must sequence the Populus genome.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Researchers reach to the skies to reveal the secrets of the stars
In 2003, Argonne scientists will analyze solar wind--single atoms and electrically charged particles from the sun--samples from NASA's Genesis mission in an effort to better understand how the planets formed and how the sun works. If successful, Genesis will become the first mission to return a sample of extraterrestrial material from beyond the moon. These samples will allow a precise measure of the elemental and isotopic composition of our most important star - the sun.

Contact: Steve Koppes
s-koppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

21-Jan-2002
Microarrays for detecting pathogens
Microarrays are tiny probes placed on a piece of glass or other material. Each probe is sensitive to a specific pathogen. The arrays are flooded with a complex mixture of DNA or RNA from environmental samples and individual probes react if particular pathogens are present.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

7-Jan-2002
Molecular structure of cancer-related proteins identified
Scientists have identified the biochemical and signaling properties of two cancer-related proteins using a process called X-ray crystallography. The technique yielded the first-ever detailed pictures of the proteins interacting with each other, indicating which areas are most essential for the development of cancer.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmucnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Rapid field detection of biological agents
Livermore scientists have developed two portable biodetection systems to help in the fight against bioterrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Creating a robot colony
Scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are creating an army of small robots--a fleet of inexpensive mini-robots designed to work harmoniously to perform tasks too hazardous or just downright boring for humans. Simple biological societies, such as ant colonies and beehives, serve as handy models for creating large groups of small, disposable robots.

Contact: Donald Dudenhoeffer
dudedd@inel.gov
208-526-0700
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Biothreat detection takes concentration
Detecting potential biological threats is part of the Department of Energy's plan for homeland defense, and a new automated device developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a key piece in biothreat detection technology.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Spectrometers — versatile tools for weapons detection
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is using four kinds of spectroscopies to develop sensors that can be used to detect weapons of mass destruction: mass spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron spectro-scopy and optical spectroscopy.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
A partner in peace
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, many researchers are working on programs aimed at keeping people safe and the world at peace. We asked Mike Kluse, Associate Laboratory Director for Pacific Northwest's National Security Directorate, about the Laboratory's role as a partner in peace and what has changed since the tragic events of Sept. 11.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling and homeland security
ORNL researchers have developed computer-based products that could provide information to help Americans better protect themselves from natural, accidental, or deliberate threats.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Molecular roller coaster analyzes compounds
Visualize a pack of various molecules in a compound, all mingling in a solution. Then imagine molecules being whisked away from the crowd, one at a time, into a tiny tube by an invisible force. About halfway through this molecular roller coaster, the molecules are flashed with ultraviolet light beamed through a small window as they scream by. That, in short, describes the operation of a new instrument created by Ed Yeung and his team of researchers at the Ames Laboratory.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3-Dec-2001
Homeland security
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently took information on three projects to DOE headquarters in Washington to brief Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham and Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge. They were part of an exhibition of more than two dozen counter-terrorism technologies sponsored by the DOE.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Nov-2001
Ames award-winning technology selected as 2001's 'Most Promising'
The Absorption Detection System in Multiple Capillaries technology, developed by Edward S. Yeung, director of Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences Program, was one of three technologies selected for the Editors' Choice Award from the 2001 R&D 100 Award winners.

Contact: Mary Jo Glanville
mglanvil@iastate.edu
515-294-5635
DOE/Ames Laboratory

5-Nov-2001
A new way to visualize cells and nuclei
To learn how tissues develop and maintain their organization—and especially to learn what goes wrong when cancer strikes—it's essential to study individual cells and their nuclei within tissues. The problem is that in real tissues, and in many cell cultures grown in the laboratory, cells are often tightly clustered; their boundaries and the borders of their nuclei are hard to distinguish.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Oct-2001
Idaho Accelerator Center leads the way in research and education
The Idaho Accelerator Center stands as a monument to the future--using science to develop devices to further national security, healthcare, and business.

Contact: James Jones
jlj@inel.gov
208-526-1730
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
Gene-rich pufferfish DNA decoded
Although the Fugu genome contains essentially the same genes and regulatory sequences as the human genome, it carries those genes and regulatory sequences in approximately 365 million bases as compared to the 3 billion bases that make up human DNA. With far less so-called "junk DNA" to sort through, finding genes and controlling sequences in the Fugu genome should be a much easier task.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 251-275 out of 361 stories.
<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

 

 

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