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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 276-300 out of 357 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

1-Oct-2001
Doing what comes naturally
Edward S. Yeung, director of Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences Program and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been selected for the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Chromatography.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
How some viruses take strong hold of cells
As part of an ongoing effort to understand how viruses infect cells, scientists at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory have deciphered the molecular-level interaction between coxsackievirus—which infects the heart, brain, pancreas, and other organs—and the human cell protein to which it attaches. This work may lead to improved ways to thwart viral infections, and may help scientists design virus-based vehicles for gene therapy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Travels of a young physicist
A young physicist recounts his career from the University of California at Berkeley and the laboratories of Alexander Pines, famed pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Microtools for the nanoworld
Most of what we call nanotechnology involves hundreds or thousands of atoms but in a nanometer there's enough room for three atoms. If we are going to achieve real nanotechnology, we are going to have to learn how to put atoms together one at a time.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
The coming of the nano-age.
The emerging field of nanotechnology promises to change the way almost everything—from vaccines to computers—is designed and made.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Nanocrystals: The shape of things to come
Nanocrystals are particularly attractive as building blocks for larger structures because it's possible - even easy - to prepare nanocrystals that are highly perfect.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Award-winning gasoline reformer is a catalyst for change
Instead of spark plugs and cylinders, environmentally friendly fuel cell engines may be under the hoods of the cars of the future. But first, scientists must find a practical and economical way to supply the hydrogen gas needed to power them. Chemical engineers at Argonne have developed and patented a compact fuel processor that “reforms” ordinary gasoline into a hydrogen-rich gas to power fuel cells.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for the future
The future of accelerator physics isn't just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow's discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for biomedical research
At the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Sep-2001
Gene therapy reduces drinking in 'alcoholic' rats
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that increasing the level of a brain protein important for transmitting pleasure signals can turn rats that prefer alcohol into light drinkers, and those with no preference into near teetotalers.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
A new addition for weighty research
The latest addition to the Laboratory's collection of FTICR mass spectrometers is the most powerful available commercially. It measures the mass of peptides —small structural units obtained by cutting proteins into pieces — with such sensitivity and precision that scientists can detect hundreds of thousands of peptide species in a single analysis.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Pumping up safety in refining gasoline
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new solid acid catalyst that may provide oil producers worldwide with a safer approach for refining unleaded gasoline with reasonably high octane.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
An in-stream waste treatment technology
A waste storage lagoon at a Washington dairy is being converted into a waste treatment facility with the help of a new technology that enhances naturally occurring biological activity.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Laboratory wins four R&D 100 Awards
Four technologies developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and their collaborators are on R&D Magazine's list of the 100 most significant technology developments for 2000.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gove
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Spectra library ready for check out
A new e-commerce site introduced by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory may provide information that can be used, for example, in monitoring trace gases in the atmosphere or in improving chemical processes to demonstrate compliance with government guidelines.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Aug-2001
New breast cancer gene found
To the small list of genes that play a role in the development of breast cancer can now be added the name ZNF217. Multiple copies of this gene were found to remove natural restrictions on cell growth and thereby increase the chances for malignancy in a study jointly conducted by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-Aug-2001
New acoustic camera captures picture of fish passage
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then how valuable is a high-resolution image of fish seen through murky water? Very valuable, according to scientists seeking to understand fish movement near hydropower dams. Recently, fisheries biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory deployed an acoustic camera originally designed for the Navy at a dam in the Northwest to study and illuminate their understanding of fish behavior.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
R & D 100 Award is fourth for Ed Yeung and 15th for Ames Lab
Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences, has won a 2001 R&D 100 Award for a remarkable advance in chemical separation technology called multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab researcher's team shines in protein folding predictions
The protein folding puzzle – determining the3--D structure of a protein given the sequence of its amino acids – is one of the major unsolved problems in molecular biology. A Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist along with a colleague and his students were recently recognized as the most successful team in an annual worldwide assessment of progress in protein structure prediction.

Contact: Charlie Strauss
cems@lanl.gov
505-665-4838
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Researchers find human's earliest ancestor yet
An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of fossil bones and teeth belonging to the earliest human ancestors yet discovered – a hominid who lived in what is now Ethiopia between 5.2 and 5.8 million years ago.

Contact: Giday WoldGabriel
wgiday@lanl.gov
505-667-8749
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
Radiation treatment in ducks may offer clues to brain tumors in children
The Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has tested an experimental microbeam radiation therapy on duck embryos that may offer clues about how to treat brain tumors in infants and young children.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Research partnership formed
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland have joined forces to advance the understanding of global climate change. The Joint Global Change Research Institute, announced in March 2001, will investigate the scientific, social and economic implications of climate change, both nationally and globally.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Grounding greenhouse gases
Moving carbon out of the atmosphere and storing it in the ground offers a promising approach to reducing greenhouse gases, principally carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are exploring how different soil management practices affect the fungal activity in soils and how that relates to the soils' ability to store carbon.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Global change - addressing a global concern
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are contributing to the scientific understanding of global climate change— pursuing a broad understanding that will serve as thefoundation for future policy and technology solutions.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 276-300 out of 357 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

 

 

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