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Features Archive

Showing stories 326-350 out of 357 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

18-Jun-2001
Genes and proteins
Consider a living cell, the fundamental unit of life. Each human cell contains the entire human genome—some 35,000 genes. But only some genes are expressed within a specific cell, resulting in the production of specific proteins. The genes that turn on in a liver cell, for example, are different from the genes that are expressed in a brain cell.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Stable isotope research resource
The ability to apply research techniques to important problems in biology and medicine depends on the availability of isotopically labeled compounds.

Contact: Clifford Unkefer
cju@lanl.gov
505-665-2560
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Early detection for protection
Being able to rapidly detect biological agents is among the most difficult and yet urgent tasks facing the nation. Whether the threat is from a natural outbreak or a terrorist's release of threat agents, medical treatment cannot effectively begin without first identifying the bioagent. At the same time, effective understanding and response to a biological threat requires rapid communication across the health-care system.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Protein crystallography resource at neutron research center for imaging proteins
Thanks to a $4.8 million capital commitment from the U.S. Department of Energy, Los Alamos researchers have completed a state-of-the-art neutron diffraction station at Los Alamos' Neutron Scattering Center, part of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, known as LANSCE. The new station went on line in December 2000.

Contact: Benno Schoenborn
schoenborn@lanl.gov
505-665-2033
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Biologically inspired nanotechnology
Much of today's scientific revolution is taking place at the nanometer scale. There is growing recognition that an ability to design and manipulate materials at the nanoscale will allow scientists to not only improve existing materials, but also develop entirely new classes of intelligent or "smart" materials for everything from miniaturized laboratories and micro-computers to drug delivery systems. To this end, lessons from biology offer revolutionary approaches.

Contact: Basil Swanson
basil@lanl.gov
505-667-5814
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The who's who of spotted owls
A unique molecular biology study of endangered Mexican spotted owls nesting in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos National Laboratory is being conducted in the Lab's Bioscience Division and has revealed valuable information about levels of genetic diversity present within the owl population.

Contact: Jonathan Longmire
jonlongmire@lanl.gov
505-667-8208
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Metabolite discovery allows for fast plant growth
A project that uses modern biotechnology to produce plants that grow faster, are more robust and contain more protein is ongoing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bioscience Division. The project stems from the discovery of a naturally occurring plant metabolite that allows plants to regulate their own nitrogen metabolism rates, resulting in plants that reach peak growth more rapidly because they fix more carbon dioxide.

Contact: Pat Unkefer
punkefer@lanl.gov
505-665-2554
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Building a better catalyst for bioremediation
There are only a few ways to handle toxic waste. Dump it, put it in a landfill, move it someplace else or change the contaminant into something less hazardous. Dealing with toxic waste is a major problem that is beginning to be addressed in an innovative way: using bacterial enzymes, catalytic proteins produced by living cells, to transform the waste.

Contact: Jim Brainard
jbrainard@lanl.gov
505-667-0150
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Microbial diversity
They have been called the foundation of the biosphere, invisible yet essential. And now researchers know bacteria are unimaginably abundant but just don 't know exactly who they are.

Contact: Cheryl Kuske
kuske@lanl.gov
505-665-4800
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Using pathogen sequence data
As scientists delve into the vast quantity of biological data currently being produced, the problems of handling such a treasure trove of information are daunting. New tools and techniques for managing, storing, analyzing, mining and visualizing this information are the focus of much attention in the scientific community, especially when the data can have a bearing on public health and even emergency response.

Contact: Paul Jackson
glm@lanl.gov
505-665-7985
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unraveling anthrax
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bioscience Division researchers have developed technologies that can uniquely identify the origins of biological organisms based on information in the DNA.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Rapid Syndrome Validation Project
Los Alamos National Laboratory is collaborating on a new tool that will provide public health officials with an early warning and response system for threats to public health.

Contact: Sandra Zink
zink@lanl.gov
505-667-5260
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Optical biopsy studied as breast cancer treatment aid
Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women aged 40-59 and was expected to total more than 45,000 deaths in the United States last year, according to the American Cancer Society. A Los Alamos National Laboratory-developed technology, the Optical Biopsy System (OBS), may aid in not only the diagnosis of breast cancer, but the success of the surgical treatment as well.

Contact: Judith Mourant
jmourant@lanl.gov
505-665-1190
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unmasking the mysteries of chronic beryllium disease
Beryllium is a unique lightweight metal used in nuclear weapons and, in the commercial sector, for telescope mirrors, golf clubs and a variety of other applications. While solid beryllium and beryllium alloys are safe, fine particulate beryllium is hazardous if inhaled.

Contact: Babetta Marrone
blm@lanl.gov
505-667-3279
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
'SNP'ing' away at human health issues
In the summer of 2000, scientists around the world cheered as the effort to unravel the mystery of the human genome reached a milestone—a completed draft of the human genome sequence. The sequence is a set of instructions that determines individual characteristics ranging from the cosmetic, such as hair and eye color, to the medically important, such as susceptibility to disease and response to treatments.

Contact: Scott White
scott_white@lanl.gov
505-665-3860
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Molecular machines and networking
We began the 20th century with very little knowledge of the molecules of life. For the first 50 years, researchers focused largely on trying to understand molecules' make up, wondering how molecules were able to do such mysterious things as pass on hereditary information.

Contact: Jill Trewhella
trewhella@lanl.gov
505-667-2690
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The chemistry of life's building blocks
Life’s molecules are made up from chemical building blocks that can be synthesized in a laboratory. The ability to synthesize these molecular components is extremely important in the quest for understanding the structures and functions of the biological macromolecules, DNA, RNA and proteins.

Contact: Ryszard Michalczyk
michalczyk@lanl.gov
505-667-7918
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Shaping the future
Proteins are the biological workhorses that make life possible. They provide structure, synthesize complicated chemicals, control the ability to move, help transmit neural impulses and perform countless other biological demands. Their ability to function properly is intimately tied to their structure—a complex arrangement of twists, loops, spirals and folds. Understanding this molecular origami is crucial in developing a fundamental understanding of molecular biology, designing disease-fighting drugs and repairing malfunctioning proteins.

Contact: Tom Terwilliger
terwilliger@lanl.gov
505-667-0072
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Genes to proteins
As researchers around the world completed sequencing the human genome, scientists and researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are setting their sights on a next logical step: understanding the function and complex interactions of the products of these genomes.

Contact: Norman Doggett
doggett@lanl.gov
505-665-4007
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The past and future of the human genome project
Los Alamos National Laboratory has a major role in the U.S. Human Genome Project, a joint Department of Energy/National Institutes of Health effort to identify all the genes in human DNA and determine the sequences of the chemical base pairs comprising the genome.

Contact: Larry Deaven
ldeaven@lanl.gov
505-667-3114
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-May-2001
MIC researchers escape gravity
Three researchers from IPRT's Microanalytical Instrumentation Center recently flew on NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft to test a new system for determining levels of treatment chemicals in water. It's part of an effort to develop novel instrumentation for monitoring the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2001
Separation technology unites lab, new company
One of Ed Yeung's latest developments — multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection — is an innovation that marks the first time that Yeung has been directly involved in launching a new company based on his technology.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Russian weapons knowledge put to peaceful work
Scientists in the Russian Federation who spent years researching and building biological weapons are now applying their knowledge to develop a promising cleanup solution for sites polluted with oil.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Laboratory science and technology contributing to environmental mission
With the end of the Cold War and the nonproliferation treaties that followed, the United States was faced with a new challenge arising from its nuclear armament efforts: dealing with a legacy of radioactive waste and contaminated areas at sites formerly used for nuclear research, development, production and testing.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Systems biology
ORNL scientists are conducting research in functional genomics—the study of genomes to determine the biological function of all the genes and their products—and proteomics—the study of the full set of proteins encoded by a genome.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 326-350 out of 357 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

 

 

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