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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 51-75 out of 172 stories.
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30-Apr-2015
Model captures how nitrogen limitation affects hydrological processes
Rising atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide act as a fertilizer for plants, speeding their growth and altering how they use water and interact with the climate. However, an insufficient supply of nitrogen can limit the rapid growth caused by increased carbon dioxide. Researchers adapted the Community Land Model to represent how nitrogen limitation affects plant growth.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

29-Apr-2015
Special science call projects announced
EMSL's Special Science Call for Proposals ran from mid-April through September and generated 23 accepted studies. The call challenged prospective users to submit high-impact research projects that took advantage of EMSL's technical resources including RadEMSL, the Quiet Wing microscopy and NanoSIMS capabilities, and HRMAC. The research associated with the call is progressing, and the projects will soon start delivering important scientific findings.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

28-Apr-2015
Ground control
The United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 the International Year of Soils. Soil is critical for food production and climate regulation. It's a complex underground ecosystem of organisms that process decaying debris to enrich the land as well as store and release carbon into the atmosphere. However, human activity and changing climate are impacting this environmental system. Scientists working at EMSL are trying to understand the complexities of soil to develop better sustainable land management to protect it.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

10-Apr-2015
Bacteria tracked feeding nitrogen to nutrient-starved plants
An international team of researchers, including three from Brookhaven National Laboratory, tracked nitrogen as soil bacteria pulled it from the air and released it as plant-friendly ammonium. This eco-friendly process -- called biological nitrogen fixation -- substantially promoted growth in certain grass crops.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Apr-2015
Major new research project to study how tropical forests worldwide respond to climate change
Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments-Tropics will couple field research with the development of a new ecosystem model that represents how tropical forests interact with Earth's climate in much greater ecological detail than ever before.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

31-Mar-2015
BigNeuron: Unlocking the secrets of the human brain
To find a standard 3-D neuron reconstruction algorithm, Big Neuron will sponsor a series of international hackathons and workshops where contending algorithms will be ported onto a common software platform to analyze neuronal physical structure using the same core dataset. All ported algorithms will be bench-tested at DOE's NERSC and ORNL, as well as Human Brain Project supercomputing centers.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

11-Mar-2015
New 2-color X-ray laser technique could reveal atomic detail of medically important proteins
A unique X-ray laser innovation developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory may make it easier and faster for scientists to fully map medically important proteins whose structures have remained stubbornly out of reach.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Mar-2015
Giant virus revealed in 3-D using X-ray laser
For the first time, researchers have produced a 3-D image revealing part of the inner structure of an intact, infectious virus, using a unique X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The virus, called Mimivirus, is in a curious class of 'giant viruses' discovered just over a decade ago.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Feb-2015
Zeolites: The inside story
Zeolites have been used for decades as catalysts and in other industrial applications, but the molecular transformations occurring within the porous material is not well understood. Scientists from universities, national laboratories and industries are using EMSL's staff expertise and advanced instrumentation to gain an atomic-level understanding of these materials to improve energy production and address environmental issues.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

12-Feb-2015
Yonath discusses visualizing ribosomes and antibiotic resistance
Ada Yonath, a pioneer in using crystallographic techniques to visualize ribosome structure, was the most recent Eugene P. Wigner Distinguished Lecturer at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Her work continues to contribute to ribosomal research, prompting researchers to look more closely at antibiotics that target bacterial ribosomes, including those of pathogenic bacteria species, an avenue that could help reverse current levels of antibiotic resistance. At the talk, she steered conversation to species-specific antibiotic resistance.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

6-Feb-2015
Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates the world's brightest Synchrotron Light Source
US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the world's most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The NSLS-II is a $912-million DOE Office of Science User Facility that produces extremely bright beams of x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light used to examine a wide range of materials, including superconductors and catalysts, geological samples, and biological proteins to accelerate advances in energy, environmental science, and medicine.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

4-Feb-2015
Record keeping helps bacteria's immune system fight invaders
Bacteria have a sophisticated means of defending themselves, and they need it: more viruses infect bacteria than any other biological entity. Two experiments undertaken at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provide new insight at the heart of bacterial adaptive defenses in a system called CRISPR, short for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Feb-2015
Five ways to put tiny targets in front of an X-ray laser
X-ray devices have long been used to see the inner structure of things, from bone breaks in the human body to the contents of luggage at airport security checkpoints. But to see life's chemistry and exotic materials at the scale of individual atoms, you need a far more powerful X-ray device. Enter the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jan-2015
X-ray study reveals division of labor in cell health protein
Researchers working in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered that a key protein for cell health, which has recently been linked to diabetes, cancer and other diseases, can multitask by having two identical protein parts divide labor.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Jan-2015
SLAC scientists search for new ways to deal with US uranium ore processing legacy
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are trying to find out why uranium persists in groundwater at former uranium ore processing sites despite remediation of contaminated surface materials two decades ago. They think buried organic material may be at fault, storing toxic uranium at levels that continue to pose risks to human health and the environment, and hope their study will pave the way for better long-term site management and protection of the public and environment.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Jan-2015
'Seeing' hydrogen atoms to unveil enzyme catalysis
A multi-institutional research team led by Chris Dealwis from Case Western Reserve University has used the new IMAGINE instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor to map an enzyme that could play an important role in anti-cancer drug development.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jan-2015
2014's top-10 scientific achievements at Brookhaven Lab
From new insights into the building blocks of matter to advances in understanding batteries, superconductors, and a protein that could help fight cancer, 2014 was a year of stunning successes for the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Dec-2014
MSL's Radiochemistry Annex: It's getting hot in there
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Washington State University and Savannah River National Laboratory are among the principal investigators seeking innovative solutions to environmental and energy production challenges in subsurface science. They are also among the scientists who submitted applications to the Special Science Call for Proposals to use EMSL's Radiochemical Annex. Learn more about three research projects using the Annex's resources.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

11-Dec-2014
DESY's Henry Chapman awarded Leibniz Prize for X-ray laser research
Henry Chapman, a scientist at Germany's DESY lab who participated in pioneering studies at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, has been awarded the Leibniz Prize. The 2.5 million euro ($3.1 million) scientific award is bestowed by a German research foundation. LCLS is a Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Dec-2014
Study may help slow the spread of flu
An important study conducted in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory may lead to new, more effective vaccines and medicines by revealing detailed information about how a flu antibody binds to a wide variety of flu viruses.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Dec-2014
X-ray laser reveals how bacterial protein morphs in response to light
Researchers have captured the highest-resolution snapshots ever taken with an X-ray laser that show changes in a protein's structure over time, revealing how a key protein in a photosynthetic bacterium changes shape when hit by light. They achieved a resolution of 1.6 angstroms, equivalent to the radius of a single tin atom.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Nov-2014
Robotics meet X-ray lasers in cutting-edge biology studies
Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are combining the speed and precision of robots with one of the brightest X-ray lasers on the planet for pioneering studies of proteins important to biology and drug discovery.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Nov-2014
New project will expand opportunities for biological discovery with SLAC's X-ray laser
A planned experimental station at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will expand capabilities for atomic-scale explorations in human health, biology, energy and environmental science using one of the brightest X-ray sources on the planet.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Nov-2014
Researchers take snapshots of potential 'kill switch' for cancer
A study conducted in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has revealed how a key human protein switches from a form that protects cells to a form that kills them -- a property that scientists hope to exploit as a 'kill switch' for cancer.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Oct-2014
National Synchrotron Light Source II achieves 'first light'
The National Synchrotron Light Source II detects its first photons, beginning a new phase of the facility's operations. Scientific experiments at NSLS-II are expected to begin before the end of the year.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 172 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>


 

 

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