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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 76-100 out of 354 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

16-Nov-2006
Sometimes smaller is better
A research team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oregon Health and Science University, University of Minnesota and the University of Idaho is studying the ability of nanoscale iron particles to reduce carbon tetrachloride, a common groundwater contaminant.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Nov-2006
Department of Energy advances commercialization of climate change technology
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary Jeffrey D. Jarrett has announced the Department's support of seven tests in North America to advance carbon sequestration technologies while attending the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate.

Contact: Mike Jacobs
202-586-0507
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

9-Nov-2006
US wind power industry tempers its 2006 forecast slightly
The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) announced on October 24th that the U.S. wind energy industry remains on track to set a record for wind power installations this year, with U.S. wind generating capacity increasing by 2,750 megawatts (MW).

Contact: Kathy Belyeu
202-383-2520
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

5-Oct-2006
ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor prepares to make 'cold' neutrons
The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has passed a major milestone in its quest to become one of the world's leading sources of 'cold' neutrons for advanced scientific research. Once fully operational, the reactor will combine with the laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source to make Oak Ridge the world's center for neutron sciences.

Contact: Mike Bradley
bradleymk@ornl.gov
865-576-9553
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Sep-2006
DOE's Solar Decathlon draws student teams worldwide
They come from around the world to participate in the Solar Decathlon, a contest focused on creating a livable, solar-powered house on a shoe-string budget.

Contact: Janice Rooney
janice_rooney@nrel.gov
303-275-3859
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

22-Sep-2006
FutureGen: Tomorrow's pollution-free power plant
FutureGen is an initiative to build the world's first integrated sequestration and hydrogen production research power plant.

Contact: Joseph Strakey
412-386-6124
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

20-Jul-2006
Detector Group builds imaging device for German Research Center
Jefferson Lab Detector Group members traveled to Heidelberg, Germany, to assemble and bring on-line a small-animal imaging device the group developed and built for the German Cancer Research Center. Work on the project began in June 2004. The device is similar other small animal imaging gamma cameras developed by the Detector Group; however, this imager design is based on a new concept developed by Vladimir Popov which resulted in highly improved detector performance.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Jun-2006
Fish-friendly solutions
Although turbines have generated power at hydroelectric dams for many years, not much is known about how water flowing through the turbines may harm fish. In efforts to design more "fish-friendly" turbines, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted laboratory experiments to examine the relationship between water velocities within the turbine chambers and injuries to fish.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Jun-2006
WSU and PNNL break ground on new facility
Washington State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory broke ground April 13, 2006, on the Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory. The BSEL is a $24-million joint effort between WSU and PNNL. Located on the WSU Tri-Cities campus, researchers will use the laboratory to develop processes for converting low-value agricultural byproducts and residues into value-added chemicals for products like plastics, solvents, fibers, pharmaceuticals and fuel additives.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

20-Dec-2005
The sky's the limit
Earth's climate is noticeably changing over time. Glaciers are smaller, droughts last longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods and hurricanes occur more frequently. PNNL researchers involved in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are working to understand these phenomena through improved cloud representations in the computer models that simulate changes in the earth's climate.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Computational biology enabling new discoveries to solve complex global problems
Ask any experienced do-it-yourselfer or professional and they'll tell you the importance of using the "right tool for the right job." At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD), the right tools are powerful high-speed computer systems that are analyzing vast amounts of data and enabling scientists to discover solutions to many complex global problems.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-375-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Environmental biomarkers provide early warning of disease
Outbreaks of Avian flu or "bird flu" during the past several years have disrupted the poultry industry. More ominous is that the virus spreads to humans. The ability to identify this disease early on may help prevent epidemics that wreak havoc on a country's economy and take lives. Now, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, through the multi-year Environmental Biomarkers Initiative (EBI), are developing new techniques and tools for identifying these early warning signals also known as environmental biomarkers.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Less is more: No-till agriculture helps mitigate global warming
Using research, technology and tractors, farmers around the world are plotting and carrying out a small revolution-a revolution that has the potential to transform agriculture and use it as a tool to mitigate global warming.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Practical climate financing — Using markets to drive cleaner energy production
Every day, people in China get sick just from breathing the air. Many die prematurely. In economic terms, pollution costs China eight to ten percent of gross domestic product in lost productivity, according to World Bank estimates. Air pollution accounts for three-quarters of that productivity loss.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Expecting the unexpected
Discovering unexpected impacts from climate change is something researcher Ruby Leung is getting used to.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2005
Going where no facility has gone before
A data acquisition system is being sent to Niger next year to collect climate information in this data-sparse region as part of a new user facility established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, ARM.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Clouds help clear up global warming questions
Is Earth's climate really changing? Climate researchers have answered this question with a resounding "Yes!" It is widely accepted that Earth's temperature will rise two to three degrees Celsius over the next 50 years if current fossil fuel emissions continue to grow at their present rate. The next question is how this warming trend will affect the climate--particularly water resources.

Contact: Media Relations
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2005
Putting it all together—people, technology, economics—and climate
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's climate research program was created in 1989 in response to a Presidential Initiative called the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The climate research group was formed in two places, with the Richland, Wash., group focusing on physical climate research and the Washington, D.C., group focusing on technology.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
The search for methane in Earth's mantle
Petroleum geologists have long searched beneath Earth's surface for oil and gas, knowing that hydrocarbons form from the decomposition of plants and animals buried over time.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
A random walk through time and space
IN 1905, Albert Einstein published five papers that shook the world of physics. His elegant arguments and conclusions were marvels of physical intuition that addressed dilemmas raised by experimental evidence.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
A winning couple
Brian and Vicky D'Urso are the first married couple to come to ORNL as Wigner Fellows. Neither was recruited by the Laboratory. As simple as it sounds, the graduates of the California Institute of Technology found information about ORNL and the Wigner Fellowship program on the Internet.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
The critical difference
The ORNL Review asked two important questions of some current and former Wigner Fellows. The questions were: "What do you think of the Wigner Fellowship program?" and "What is your impression of ORNL as a place to do research?" The answers are revealing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-326-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 354 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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