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Features Archive

Showing stories 1-25 out of 172 stories.
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18-Aug-2014
Berkeley Lab's SPOT Suite transforms beamline science
For decades, synchrotron light sources have been operating on a manual grab-and-go data management model, but a recent deluge of data is quickly making this practice implausible. So Berkeley Lab X-ray scientists, facility users, computer and computational scientists, teamed up to create new tools for reducing, managing, analyzing and visualizing beamline data.The result of this collaboration is SPOT Suite, and it is already transforming the way scientists run their experiments at the ALS.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

22-Jul-2014
Sandia ensures US nuclear weapons deterrent can remain effective, credible
As part of its mission of ensuring the nation's stockpile is safe, secure and effective as a deterrent, Sandia National Laboratories must make sure crucial parts can function if they're hit by radiation, especially a type called fast neutrons. It created a science-based program called QASPR, which combines computer modeling and simulation, and experiments and technology development.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

17-Jul-2014
Hot plasma partial to bootstrap current
Supercomputers at NERSC are helping plasma physicists 'bootstrap' a potentially more affordable and sustainable fusion reaction. If successful, fusion reactors could provide almost limitless clean energy.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

16-Jul-2014
Supercomputers reveal strange, stress-induced transformations in world's thinnest materials
Using Brookhaven Lab supercomputers, Columbia University researchers discovered exotic transformations in graphene and other monolayer materials under strain.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

29-May-2014
High-performance computing at Los Alamos announces milestone for key/value middleware
At Los Alamos, a supercomputer epicenter where 'big data set' really means something, a data middleware project has achieved a milestone for specialized information organization and storage. The Multi-dimensional Hashed Indexed Middleware project at Los Alamos National Laboratory recently achieved 1,782,105,749 key/value inserts per second into a globally-ordered key space on Los Alamos National Laboratory's Moonlight supercomputer.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

29-May-2014
Get ready for the computers of the future
Sandia experts expect multiple computing device-level technologies in the future, rather than one dominant architecture. About a dozen possible next-generation candidates exist, including tunnel FETs (field effect transistors, in which the output current is controlled by a variable electric field), carbon nanotubes, superconductors and fundamentally new approaches, such as quantum computing and brain-inspired computing.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

29-May-2014
Multidimensional image processing and analysis in R
An esoteric, open-source programming language -- called R -- could pave the way for open science. Thousands of scientists are participating in the R development community, including Berkeley Lab Postdoc Talita Perciano. As a student, she contributed one of the first image-processing tools -- called R Image Processing Analysis -- to the community. Now with big science datasets in mind, she's updated the existing tool with improved features for complex data analysis.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

15-May-2014
The brain: Key to a better computer
Although brain-inspired computing is in its infancy, Sandia National Laboratories has included it in a long-term research project whose goal is future computer systems. Neuro-inspired computing seeks to develop algorithms that would run on computers that function more like a brain than a conventional computer.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-May-2014
What lies beneath
The effects of biogeochemical and geochemical processes in the ground under us are on massive scales. Understanding what's going on down there and how it effects what's going on up here is an enormous undertaking. Scientists working at EMSL are getting a handle on these gigantic macroscopic processes by focusing on the microscopic scale. By creating micromodels and incorporating supercomputer simulations, researchers are connecting the molecular level with processes that affect our entire ecosystem.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

21-Apr-2014
Computer-assisted accelerator design
Accelerator physicist Stephen Brooks uses custom designed software to create a 3-D virtual model of the electron accelerator Brookhaven physicists hope to build inside the tunnel currently housing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

7-Apr-2014
Generations of supercomputers pin down primordial plasma
Brookhaven Lab's Lattice Gauge Theory Group hunts for equations to describe the early universe and the forces binding matter together. Their search spans generations of supercomputers and parallels studies of the primordial plasma discovered and explored at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Mar-2014
Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta
Researchers at the University of Cape Town, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the United Nations Development Programme have analyzed how human-induced climate change has affected recent flooding in an ecologically and geographically unique river basin in southern Africa -- the Okavango River. After running a number of simulations, they found that greenhouse gas emissions have substantially reduced the chance of the floods in the region.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Mar-2014
Tapping into the metabolome
Metabolomics -- a field often called "the last 'omics frontier" -- seeks to understand the fundamental metabolic workings of a cell in a changing environment. Scientists at EMSL use mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance, imaging devices and other cutting-edge instruments to glean the information to help produce better fuels, crops and other bioproducts.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Mar-2014
A new mathematics for experimental science
In the age of high-resolution detectors and international research collaborations, math has the potential to transform science and accelerate discovery. But this work will require state-of-the-art mathematics, carefully crafted in inventive new ways. That's where the Center for Applied Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory comes in.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

12-Feb-2014
Bulkier is better?
Researchers at two Office of Science Labs, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, recently found a 3-D counterpart to graphene.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

30-Jan-2014
Early Edison users deliver results
Before any supercomputer is accepted at NERSC, scientists are invited to put the system through its paces during an "early science" phase. While the main aim of this period is to test the new system, many scientists are able to use the time to significantly advance their work.

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Jan-2014
NERSC celebrates 40 years at the forefront
This year, the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is celebrating yet another milestone: its 40th anniversary.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
KKincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Jan-2014
A map made in the heavens
Researchers supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science have made an incredibly precise map of the universe to better understand dark energy and other wonders within.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-Jan-2014
Deployments of network monitoring software perfSONAR hit 1,000
Finding the network bottlenecks that can slow the flow of science data sets and impede research can be extremely complex, especially as such data transfers cross a multitude of linked networks. But perfSONAR, a network monitoring software package developed jointly by DOE's Energy Sciences Network, national labs, universities and Internet 2, is making that task much easier. In January 2014, the number of perfSONAR instances installed in the US and 13 other countries reached 1,000.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

24-Jan-2014
Defense from a distance
Researchers are helping the military play defense from a distance.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-Jan-2014
Protein puzzles and scientific solutions
Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used powerful new capabilities to -- for the first time -- generate a complete 3-D model of a protein without making use of any previous clue to its structure.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Dec-2013
Titan simulates earthquake physics necessary for safer building design
Researchers with the Southern California Earthquake Center are using ORNL's Titan supercomputer to prepare the state for its next big earthquake.

Contact: Jeff Gary
garyjd@ornl.gov
865-574-8066
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

17-Oct-2013
Architects and building engineers flock to NREL
Eight busloads of architects and mechanical engineers toured one of the world's largest net-zero-energy office building this summer at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and came away inspired with new ideas for how to design and build beautiful, eco-friendly structures on a budget.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/Ames Laboratory

26-Sep-2013
Supercomputers help solve a 50-year homework assignment
A group of theoretical physicists has solved half of a 50-year homework assignment -- a calculation of one type of subatomic particle decay aimed at helping to answer the question of why the early universe ended up with an excess of matter.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Sep-2013
Supercomputing the transition from ordinary to extraordinary forms of matter
Supercomputing calculations plus experimental data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are helping scientists map out the nuclear phase diagram. This research offers insight into the transition of quark-gluon plasma to ordinary matter -- which mimics the formation of visible matter in the universe today.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 172 stories.
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