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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 101-125 out of 162 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

1-Mar-2002
From kilobytes to petabytes in 50 years
"The day when the scientist, no matter how devoted, can make significant progress alone and without material help has passed." - E.O. Lawrence, founder of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on accepting the 1939 Nobel Prize for Physics.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Giving an EDGE to sustainable design
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed tools for sustainable design, a term that describes a systematic approach to ensuring that facilities, products and processes are addressing the "triple bottom line" - the environment, economics and social equity.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Modernizing the military
From software to identification systems, diagnostics to emergency management, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed technologies that could support the military as it moves into the 21st century.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sophisticated imagery analysis
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory launched its Imaging Science and Technology Initiative (ISAT) in 2001 to cover a broad range of potential applications, including counterterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Border training helps reduce dangerous smuggling
A joint program between the U.S. Customs Service and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides training to foreign border guards, customs patrol and frontier police on how to spot red flags that should trigger a search, as well as how to use specialized technology to detect and identify items used to make nuclear, chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Airport security scanner for safer skies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have spent more than 12 years developing a Personal Security Scanner that allows security guards to "see" concealed weapons, including plastic explosives and other nonmetallic threats.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Information analysis—by Starlight
Much like individual stars coalesce to form constellations, information visualization software developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helps decision-makers see the importance of individual pieces of data by showing how they relate to one another.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
Providing technical aid to small producers in America's oil fields
Fracturing, New Computer Imaging Focus of Recent DOE Selections More than half of America's oil production from the lower 48 States is supplied by small independent producers. As these companies become increasingly important to America's energy security, the Energy Department continues to provide grants for the smallest of these producers to test better technologies that can keep their wells pumping.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
International effort to sequence the first tree genome
Cottonwoods, hybrid poplars, and aspens could play a role in improving the environment, displacing imported oil and creating domestic jobs, but first scientists from the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and around the world must sequence the Populus genome.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
State-of-the-art magnetoelectronics lab puts Ames Lab on thin-film fast track
Tucked away in a small laboratory space on the second floor of Metals Development is new, state-of-the-art research equipment that should help boost Ames Lab researchers David Jiles and John Snyder to the forefront of thin-film research and the newly emerging field of magnetoelectronics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Creating a robot colony
Scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are creating an army of small robots--a fleet of inexpensive mini-robots designed to work harmoniously to perform tasks too hazardous or just downright boring for humans. Simple biological societies, such as ant colonies and beehives, serve as handy models for creating large groups of small, disposable robots.

Contact: Donald Dudenhoeffer
dudedd@inel.gov
208-526-0700
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
'Fast-talking' clusters
Researchers at Ames Laboratory's Scalable Computing Lab have extended their investigation into communication technology for cluster computers thanks to a National Science Foundation Major Research Instrument grant awarded to Iowa State University's Center for Physical and Computational Mathematics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
From the stone age to the lego block age of computing
The Center for Component Technology for Terascale Simulation Software (CCTTSS), another of ORNL's projects to receive funding from DOE's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program, may well revolutionize the way terascale software simulations are developed.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling and homeland security
ORNL researchers have developed computer-based products that could provide information to help Americans better protect themselves from natural, accidental, or deliberate threats.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Car crash simulations may improve vehicle efficiency
ORNL researchers are building computer models of vehicles made of aluminum, regular steel, high-strength steel, and carbon-fiber composites. This research could lead to safer, energy-efficient cars.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Chemical experiments and predictions by computer
Supercomputers can be used to simulate chemical reactions, saving time and money and increasing safety.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Developing computer tools for scientists
ORNL researchers and their university and national lab colleagues are developing tools to enable scientists to run simulation codes more efficiently on massively parallel supercomputers and clusters of personal computers.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
The science grid
Science grids are being established to connect scientists, instruments, computing, and data.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Dec-2001
Advanced computing and high energy physics for the 21st century
Through the SciDAC awards, Fermilab will receive approximately $1.28 million a year for the next three years as a participant in three nationwide collaborations: the Particle Physics DataGrid; Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology; and the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Afterglows, the hard way
Combining the newest of astronomical instruments with the most venerable techniques of patient attention to detail, scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of Chicago and other institutions believe they have made the first optical observation of a gamma ray burst afterglow unprompted by prior observation of the gamma ray burst itself-a so-called "orphan afterglow."

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 101-125 out of 162 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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