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Features Archive

Showing stories 151-162 out of 162 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

1-Jun-2001
Bubble science benefits deep divers
Nitrogen, that colorless, odorless gas that makes up 80 percent of our air, is perfectly harmless as it's breathed in and out on land, but for underwater divers, it's the enemy.

Contact: Bruce Wienke
brw@lanl.gov
505-667-1358
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The chemistry of life's building blocks
Life’s molecules are made up from chemical building blocks that can be synthesized in a laboratory. The ability to synthesize these molecular components is extremely important in the quest for understanding the structures and functions of the biological macromolecules, DNA, RNA and proteins.

Contact: Ryszard Michalczyk
michalczyk@lanl.gov
505-667-7918
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Shaping the future
Proteins are the biological workhorses that make life possible. They provide structure, synthesize complicated chemicals, control the ability to move, help transmit neural impulses and perform countless other biological demands. Their ability to function properly is intimately tied to their structure—a complex arrangement of twists, loops, spirals and folds. Understanding this molecular origami is crucial in developing a fundamental understanding of molecular biology, designing disease-fighting drugs and repairing malfunctioning proteins.

Contact: Tom Terwilliger
terwilliger@lanl.gov
505-667-0072
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Genes to proteins
As researchers around the world completed sequencing the human genome, scientists and researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are setting their sights on a next logical step: understanding the function and complex interactions of the products of these genomes.

Contact: Norman Doggett
doggett@lanl.gov
505-665-4007
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
The past and future of the human genome project
Los Alamos National Laboratory has a major role in the U.S. Human Genome Project, a joint Department of Energy/National Institutes of Health effort to identify all the genes in human DNA and determine the sequences of the chemical base pairs comprising the genome.

Contact: Larry Deaven
ldeaven@lanl.gov
505-667-3114
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Mar-2001
Science fiction becomes science reality
Who dreams up James Bond's toys? 007 and his gadgets may be a creation of Ian Fleming and Hollywood but those imaginative fellows do exist. A few of them work in INEEL's National Security Division. And there is a government organization that sponsors some of their projects - the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Contact: Mike Occhionero
occhmp@inel.gov
208-526-1535
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Diagnostics software powers the bottom line
High operations and maintenance expenses can quickly eat away a company's profits. On the flip side, finding a way to keep equipment running efficiently can improve productivity and greatly reduce costs.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Software tools making it easy to be apart but work together
Even kindergartners understand the importance of sharing and working together, yet adults in the workplace are still looking for simple ways to do these very things—especially when team members are in different locations. Information scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a set of web-based tools to encourage and improve interactions among team members and the data they need.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Systems biology
ORNL scientists are conducting research in functional genomics—the study of genomes to determine the biological function of all the genes and their products—and proteomics—the study of the full set of proteins encoded by a genome.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
The crystal robot
Innovative robotics designed and built by Lab researchers will grow protein crystals for experimentation at a rate once only dreamed of.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Dec-2000
Seeing the cell nucleus in 3-D
A new microscopic program called daVinci is helping researchers better understand how breast cancer develops.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Evaluating vehicle emissions controls
ORNL researchers are developing software tools for supercomputers that will simulate engine exhaust from various lean-burn diesel and gasoline engines as it flows through envisioned catalytic converters designed to chemically transform pollutants into harmless emissions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 151-162 out of 162 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

 

 

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