U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 175 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

6-May-2010
A robot called WANDA
Berkeley Lab scientists have established a revolutionary nanocrystal-making robot, capable of producing nanocrystals with staggering precision. This one-of-a-kind robot, named WANDA, provides colloidal nanocrystals with custom-made properties for electronics, biological labeling and luminescent devices. Since this robot is controlled by software protocols, novice users can direct WANDA to perform complex workflows that traditionally require extensive chemistry experience.

Contact: Aditi Risbud
asrisbud@lbl.gov
510-486-4861
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-Aug-2008
Hope for those with Parkinson's
A Department of Energy program that opens some of the world's most powerful computers to researchers around the globe has generated a promising lead for a Parkinson's disease treatment.

Contact: DOE Headquarters Press Office
202-586-4940
DOE/US Department of Energy

9-Jul-2007
Lab enhances scientific data sharing with cutting-edge connection
In early 2005, researchers affiliated with Hall B wanted to transfer raw data from a recent experiment from the tape silo to computers offsite -- a task that without interruption would have taken the Lab's existing network connection almost seven days. Jefferson Lab's newly upgraded network connection is able to transfer data at a rate of up to 10 Gigabits per second, so that same transfer can now be completed in just 2.5 hours.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

15-Jun-2007
Data-intensive computing laying foundation for biological breakthroughs
Biological breakthroughs to solve society's most challenging problems require innovative tools and a "different way" to analyze the enormous amounts of data being generated.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

22-Mar-2007
Data-intensive computing key to predictive science
The ability to protect the nation from terrorist attacks, discover the hidden secrets of genes and monitor and control the electrical power grid requires the ability to process and analyze massive amounts of data and information in real time.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Nov-2006
ScalaBLAST solves problems in record time
Scientists are dedicated to making discoveries that influence our world, but making these discoveries takes time. It took Albert Einstein 16 years to express his general theory of relativity. Benjamin Franklin was first introduced to electricity experiments on a trip to Boston in 1746, but his famous lightning rod experiment didn't occur until six years later -- and he knocked himself unconscious more than once in the process.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

8-Aug-2006
Jefferson Lab's newest cluster computer takes shape
Unlike a regular computer -- whose "brain" consists of one or perhaps two processors -- a cluster computer's brain can contain hundreds or even thousands of individual processors, called nodes -- all wired together. To solve a problem, the cluster splits the problem into parts, and each node computes its designated part and shares the result with other nodes to produce the final solution.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

28-Mar-2006
PPPL developes internet-based simulation capabilities
Physicists at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are developing internet-based interfaces which will allow researchers to access powerful simulation tools used to interpret experimental data and predict plasma behavior in future experiments.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Knowledge centers: Sweet suites of informational tools
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has created a new way to manage scientific research and deal with the resulting information overload. Three types of knowledge centers -- science-based, technology-based and mission-based -- are tackling the daunting tasks of collecting, managing, visualizing, analyzing, distributing and storing massive data accumulations using unique software products.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Data-intensive computing to large science discoveries
The advancement in computing technology has enabled scientists to collect massive amounts of data, taking us a step closer to solving complex problems such as global climate change and uncovering the secrets hidden in genes. The exponential growth in the amount of data collected in research, however, has created an urgent technical challenge.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Innovative tools for high-performance computing
Solving complex scientific problems requires not only advanced high-performance supercomputers but also innovative software programs that can discover patterns and integrate data across different space and time scales. Researchers at PNNL are creating innovative software and processes to do just that.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Cyber security
Do you worry about the security of your credit card when you buy something over the Internet? Or when you pay your bills electronically? What about business trade secrets communicated by email from engineering to manufacturing staff or sensitive data stored on local hard drives? Computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using a systems approach combined with a multidisciplinary team of experts to address cyber security issues such as these.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
NVAC: Visualizing a safer homeland
September 11, 2001 forever changed how Americans view national security. The responsibility for protecting citizens from future attacks has fallen on government shoulders in an increasingly discontented world. One way the Department of Homeland Security has responded is with new visual analytic technologies that transform volumes of documents, emails, images, videos and voice recordings into interactive visuals.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Ames Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
Meet the grid
Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Seismic detectives go underground
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using data gathered by seismology stations to develop a mathematical framework for identifying and locating seismological events around the world. Their work, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Ground Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program, will be used by the U.S. government to monitor explosions and weapons tests.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

11-Feb-2005
Experiment and theory have a partner: Simulation
Even before Lawrence Livermore opened in September 1952, cofounders E. O. Lawrence and Edward Teller recognized the need for a computer and placed an order for one of the first production Univacs.

Contact: Mark Seager
seager1@llnl.gov
925-423-3141
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2005
A passion for computation benefits every discipline
It's no secret that computers are in Lawrence Livermore's blood. That passion for computation was one of the principal factors that brought me to Livermore three years ago to become associate director of Computation.

Contact: Science and Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
High tech lab gets a high tech control room
Jefferson Lab's nerve center, the Machine Control Center, has been transformed into a state-of-the-art, technologically advanced and ergonomically sound control room ready to meet the challenges of a demanding user community

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

10-Dec-2004
Fastest gun in the West
SLAC partnered with CalTech, Fermilab, CERN and the University of Florida, along with groups from the UK, Brazil and Korea to defend its title as one of the fastest guns in the West--or, more accurately, the largest bandwidth, which is the computing equivalent.

Contact: SLAC
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Piloting the pipeline
R pal. The automated pipeline. Mass spec and proteomics. These phrases are used by ORNL researchers who probe microbes to determine what these "bugs" are made of and what drives them.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Keeping the power on by linking the grid
On the afternoon of August 14, 2003, an estimated 50 million people in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and part of Canada suddenly lost electric power in a blackout that lasted up to four days in some areas. The massive outage represented 61,800 megawatts of lost power, cost the United States an estimated $10 billion, and drew attention to a critical need for improved power system reliability.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Getting the big picture
Dozens to hundreds of interconnected personal computers (PCs), stacked up row after row and operating simultaneously: that in a nutshell describes many of the latest high-performance supercomputers.

Contact: Sean Ahern
seanahern@llnl.gov
925-422-1648
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Echoes of the past in silicon chips
Thermal oxide is the real on-off switch for your computer. The nanometers-thick film on the surface of silicon transistors helps turn on and off the flow of electricity through the transistor, providing the 0 and 1 binary signals modern electronics run on. There are several million transistors on each computer chip.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Director's corner: SLAC has a unique contribution to make to international linear collider
As many of you know, the worldwide high energy physics community has reached an important milestone on the path to building an electron-positron linear collider, a facility that will unlock some of nature's greatest mysteries.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/US Department of Energy

Showing stories 51-75 out of 175 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map