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Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 162 stories.
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9-Nov-2005
Meet the grid
Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries.

Contact: Symmetry Magazine
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Seismic detectives go underground
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using data gathered by seismology stations to develop a mathematical framework for identifying and locating seismological events around the world. Their work, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Ground Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program, will be used by the U.S. government to monitor explosions and weapons tests.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

11-Feb-2005
Experiment and theory have a partner: Simulation
Even before Lawrence Livermore opened in September 1952, cofounders E. O. Lawrence and Edward Teller recognized the need for a computer and placed an order for one of the first production Univacs.

Contact: Mark Seager
seager1@llnl.gov
925-423-3141
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2005
A passion for computation benefits every discipline
It's no secret that computers are in Lawrence Livermore's blood. That passion for computation was one of the principal factors that brought me to Livermore three years ago to become associate director of Computation.

Contact: Science and Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
High tech lab gets a high tech control room
Jefferson Lab's nerve center, the Machine Control Center, has been transformed into a state-of-the-art, technologically advanced and ergonomically sound control room ready to meet the challenges of a demanding user community

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

10-Dec-2004
Fastest gun in the West
SLAC partnered with CalTech, Fermilab, CERN and the University of Florida, along with groups from the UK, Brazil and Korea to defend its title as one of the fastest guns in the West--or, more accurately, the largest bandwidth, which is the computing equivalent.

Contact: SLAC
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Piloting the pipeline
R pal. The automated pipeline. Mass spec and proteomics. These phrases are used by ORNL researchers who probe microbes to determine what these "bugs" are made of and what drives them.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Keeping the power on by linking the grid
On the afternoon of August 14, 2003, an estimated 50 million people in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and part of Canada suddenly lost electric power in a blackout that lasted up to four days in some areas. The massive outage represented 61,800 megawatts of lost power, cost the United States an estimated $10 billion, and drew attention to a critical need for improved power system reliability.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Getting the big picture
Dozens to hundreds of interconnected personal computers (PCs), stacked up row after row and operating simultaneously: that in a nutshell describes many of the latest high-performance supercomputers.

Contact: Sean Ahern
seanahern@llnl.gov
925-422-1648
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Echoes of the past in silicon chips
Thermal oxide is the real on-off switch for your computer. The nanometers-thick film on the surface of silicon transistors helps turn on and off the flow of electricity through the transistor, providing the 0 and 1 binary signals modern electronics run on. There are several million transistors on each computer chip.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Director's corner: SLAC has a unique contribution to make to international linear collider
As many of you know, the worldwide high energy physics community has reached an important milestone on the path to building an electron-positron linear collider, a facility that will unlock some of nature's greatest mysteries.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-Aug-2004
Uncovering secrets of living cells
Probing microbes to determine what they are made of and what drives them requires more than mass spectrometers, microarrays, and microscopes. Computational models run on supercomputers have been key contributors to our growing understanding of these single-cell organisms.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Exploring and modeling 21st Century materials
The 1986 discovery of high-temperature superconductivity sparked the quest for room-temperature superconductors that could transmit electrical current without heat losses and without the need for an expensive coolant such as liquid helium. Room-temperature superconductors could make possible ultra-efficient power transmission lines, practical electric cars, and superconducting magnets that could bring high-speed levitated trains and smaller, more efficient, and less costly rotating machinery, appliances, particle accelerators, electric generators, and medical imaging devices.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Tomorrow's molecular and nanoscale devices
Chemists are now about to cross a remarkable threshold and expect a dramatic expansion in their ability to make reliable predictions about molecular structure and processes.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Strategic supercomputing comes of age
With the birth of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), the need for better computer simulations became paramount to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile remained safe, reliable, and capable of meeting performance requirements.

Contact: Randy Christensen
christensen5@llnl.gov
925-423-3054
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

15-Mar-2004
Markowitz tapped for Joint Genome Institute Chief Informatics Officer
The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) today (March 15) announced that Victor M. Markowitz, D.Sc., has been appointed to the newly created position of Chief Informatics Officer.

Contact: David E. Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

19-Feb-2004
DZero breaks new ground in global computing efforts
Searching for subatomic particles very much resembles the often-cited search for the needle in the haystack. Since the beginning of Collider Run II in March 2001, DZero scientists have collected more than 550 million particle collisions. The data fill five stacks of CDs as high as the Eiffel tower--storage cases not included. And the (hay)stacks are growing every day.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
Critical information for critical situations
Each year, tens of thousands of people around the world die in natural and human-caused disasters. In an emergency, the ability to obtain and track highly dynamic status information is crucial for control rooms, incident command centers (ICCs) and emergency operations centers (EOCs).

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Parallel computers 'evolutionize' research
A major research trend is harnessing advanced computers to complement theory and experiment. Advanced computing allows scientists to conduct experiments that could not otherwise be done, to test possible experiments before investing the time and money to physically carry them out, and to create models of complex phenomena.

Contact: David Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Globus Toolkit enables Grid computing
Argonne technology is bringing closer the day when the Internet can let people share computing, storage, data, programs and other resources as easily as the electric power grid allows people and energy companies to share electricity.

Contact: Dave Jacqué
info@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

18-Nov-2003
Fastest unclassified supercomputer in the west
The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory currently has the fastest operational unclassified supercomputer in the U.S. The 11.8-teraflops system at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory will advance novel studies in research areas such as atmospheric chemistry, systems biology, catalysis, and materials science.

Contact: Staci Maloof
Staci.Maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/US Department of Energy

16-Apr-2003
Modeling bone remodeling
Los Alamos theoreticians are using algorithms developed in weapons research to understand bone dynamics and abnormalities like osteoporosis.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

3-Mar-2003
The next-generation supercomputer
In September 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Cray, Inc., of Seattle, Washington, will deploy Cray's X1 system at ORNL's Center for Computational Science. This next-generation supercomputer will be instrumental in addressing problems related to climate, biology, nanoscale materials, fusion, and astrophysics.

Contact: Cindy Ross Lundy
lundycr@ornl.gov
865-574-1642
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Mozart—A genius at assessing your Web site
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an Internet assessment tool, called Mozart, that quickly archives and analyzes entire Web sites based on search terms provided by the user and built-in search libraries containing hundreds of key phrases designed to find sensitive information.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 162 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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