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Features Archive

Showing stories 126-150 out of 213 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

10-Aug-2004
New research facility holds promise for nation's energy future
Ground was broken July 27 on a new facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), designed to increase collaboration among researchers and speed the time it takes for new technologies to move from the laboratory bench to commercial manufacturing.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
303-275-4050
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Nuclear energy to go: A self-contained, portable reactor
Nuclear energy supplies 20 percent of the electricity used in the U.S. and 16 percent of that used throughout the world. But as the global use of nuclear energy grows, so do concerns about the vulnerability of nuclear plants and fuel materials to misuse or attacks by terrorists.

Contact: Craig Smith
smith94@llnl.gov
925-423-1772
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Going to extremes
Little is known about the chemistry that produces minerals in the deep regions of Earth or that creates the ammonia oceans of the outer planets and moons. What is known is that an element's fundamental properties--its optical, structural, electrical, and magnetic characteristics--can completely change when it is put under extreme conditions.

Contact: Larry Fried
fried1@llnl.gov
925-422-7796
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Helping water managers ensure clean and reliable supplies
MOST Americans take cheap and plentiful supplies of pure drinking water for granted. Some even consider it to be an inalienable right. However, clean water sources, especially pristine underground aquifers, are being consumed at an increasing rate, and contaminants and changing patterns in rain and snowfall are threatening the adequacy of supplies.

Contact: Robin Newmark
newmark1@llnl.gov
925-423-3644
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
SARS foam- Sandia foams fight SARS virus
In a series of tests conducted at Kansas State University on Bovine coronavirus (BCV) -- the internationally accepted surrogate for the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus -- Sandia versions of its DF- 200 formulation fully inactivated samples in one minute or less.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2004
Yucca mountain- Pursuing a license
Sandia National Laboratories scientists, engineers and technicians are performing critical experiments deep in the volcanic heart of Nevada's Yucca Mountain to provide information that will assist in a key decision as to whether to license the remote site as a permanent repository for these radioactive wastes. Our feature story looks at Sandia's role in the 20-year project.

Contact: Will Keener
rwkeene@sandia.gov
505-844-1690
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2004
Seeing the universe in a grain of dust
Imagine traveling halfway to Jupiter--3.2 billion kilometers--for a small handful of comet dust. That's the mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Stardust spacecraft launched on February 7, 1999. This past January, Stardust flew by Comet Wild 2's nucleus and through a halo of gases and dust at the comet's head, collecting cometary dust particles released from the surface just hours before.

Contact: John Bradley
bradely33@llnl.gov
925-423-0666
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Nuclear plants may be clean hydrogen source
For more than 100 years, visionaries have periodically espoused the dream of an economy driven by hydrogen - an efficient fuel that emits only water when burned.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Argonne tests, creates fuel cells to power the future
Fuel cells are a key component of the nation's plan for a secure energy future. Fuel cells convert hydrogen gas into electricity and water. Since hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic resources, researchers are seeking cost-efficient ways to use it to meet the nation's growing energy needs and reduce the nation's oil reliance.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Fueling the hydrogen future with Argonne's ceramic membrane
A ceramic membrane developed at Argonne brings fuel-cell cars closer to reality by efficiently and inexpensively extracting hydrogen from fossil fuels.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

6-May-2004
Brookhaven-developed recyclable catalyst may help to reduce hazardous industrial waste
Brookhaven chemists have developed a new, "green" catalyst -- one that converts chemical reactants into usable products without producing waste.

Contact: Morris Bullock
bullock@bnl.gov
631-344-4315
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-May-2004
Brookhaven develops clean, sustainable energy alternatives
Biofuel field testing, wind-energy design, battery-material development, natural-gas harvesting, clean hydrogen production -- these are several of the alternative-energy research initiatives now underway at Brookhaven. The goal is to transfer to industry technology that solves world-wide energy challenges in an innovative, economically feasible fashion.

Contact: William Horak
horak@bnl.gov
631-344-2627
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
Engine shows diesel efficiency without the emissions
Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced harmful emissions.

Contact: Salvador Aceves
aceves6@llnl.gov
925-422-0864
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Staying In the comfort zone
Randy Nanstad examines the setup for a fracture toughness test of a stainless steel cladding specimen from the Davis-Besse reactor pressure vessel head.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Recovering fuel from waste
The nation's permanent nuclear waste repository could be used more efficiently than currently planned, according to ORNL's Emory Collins. He and his colleagues believe it makes sense for the repository to take mainly nuclear fission products, or 5% of the wastes, and turn away the bulk of the waste--spent nuclear fuel. The usable uranium and plutonium in this material could be extracted, chemically treated, and recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Coming full circle
The resurrection of gas centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment--a dream come true for many Oak Ridge researchers--has brought the largest CRADA ever to ORNL.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
A revolutionary reactor concept
A revolutionary nuclear reactor concept, based partly on ORNL's past coolant and fuel research, could be an economical source of hydrogen. Called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor(AHTR), it would cost only half as much as current gas-cooled reactor concepts.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Can the next generation take the heat?
Oak Ridge National Laboratory has long been a world leader in materials research, and now with the resurgence of interest in nuclear energy, ORNL has a leading role in developing and selecting materials for the next generation of nuclear power plants.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Fabricating fuels
Over the past decade, increased public pressure to provide more electricity, reduce air pollution, and slow the rate of global warming has led many Americans to revisit the potential of nuclear power to meet anticipated demands for more energy. The Department of Energy and others in the scientific community are interested in adapting the gas-cooled reactor for use both in producing hydrogen for fuel cells to power cars and buildings and in supplying electricity competitively.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3-Mar-2004
INEEL helps design winter wonder bus
Yellowstone National Park may soon become more accessible in both winter and summer, thanks to collaborative efforts to develop a new alternative fuel vehicle.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

3-Mar-2004
Just say 'no' to adenovirus
Description of research on adenovirus at Brookhaven National Laboratory suggesting that nitric oxide might work as an antiviral agent.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Nuclear renaissance
Growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are raising concerns of global warming and sparking renewed interest in nuclear power. Unlike coal- and gas-fired power plants, nuclear power plants provide electricity without emitting carbon dioxide. They could also enable a hydrogen economy.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Jul-2003
Marie & Pierre Curie’s granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, visits the United States
Jefferson Lab science writer Melanie O'Byrne spoke with Langevin-Joliot during the recent International Symposium for Spinal Radiography at Georgetown University. In the following excerpt, she discusses her work, passion for science, and remarkable family history. She is a respected nuclear physicist from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Orsay, the laboratory set up by her parents, Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie, who won a Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

9-May-2003
Burning plasma: the future of fusion energy
Almost all activities on the surface of the earth are ultimately powered by the sun, whether by today's sunshine or by fossil fuels formed millions of years ago.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
NREL wins research and development awards
The laboratory's three R&D 100 Awards for 2002 are for the PSS Coating System; a solar power system that produces electricity while still allowing sunlight to pass through it; and an incredibly thin ceramic fiber that effectively filters out bacteria and viruses and can enhance the performance of composite materials.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@prodigy.net
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing stories 126-150 out of 213 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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