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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 151-175 out of 224 stories.
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1-Apr-2004
Recovering fuel from waste
The nation's permanent nuclear waste repository could be used more efficiently than currently planned, according to ORNL's Emory Collins. He and his colleagues believe it makes sense for the repository to take mainly nuclear fission products, or 5% of the wastes, and turn away the bulk of the waste--spent nuclear fuel. The usable uranium and plutonium in this material could be extracted, chemically treated, and recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Coming full circle
The resurrection of gas centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment--a dream come true for many Oak Ridge researchers--has brought the largest CRADA ever to ORNL.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
A revolutionary reactor concept
A revolutionary nuclear reactor concept, based partly on ORNL's past coolant and fuel research, could be an economical source of hydrogen. Called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor(AHTR), it would cost only half as much as current gas-cooled reactor concepts.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Can the next generation take the heat?
Oak Ridge National Laboratory has long been a world leader in materials research, and now with the resurgence of interest in nuclear energy, ORNL has a leading role in developing and selecting materials for the next generation of nuclear power plants.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Fabricating fuels
Over the past decade, increased public pressure to provide more electricity, reduce air pollution, and slow the rate of global warming has led many Americans to revisit the potential of nuclear power to meet anticipated demands for more energy. The Department of Energy and others in the scientific community are interested in adapting the gas-cooled reactor for use both in producing hydrogen for fuel cells to power cars and buildings and in supplying electricity competitively.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3-Mar-2004
INEEL helps design winter wonder bus
Yellowstone National Park may soon become more accessible in both winter and summer, thanks to collaborative efforts to develop a new alternative fuel vehicle.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

3-Mar-2004
Just say 'no' to adenovirus
Description of research on adenovirus at Brookhaven National Laboratory suggesting that nitric oxide might work as an antiviral agent.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Nuclear renaissance
Growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are raising concerns of global warming and sparking renewed interest in nuclear power. Unlike coal- and gas-fired power plants, nuclear power plants provide electricity without emitting carbon dioxide. They could also enable a hydrogen economy.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Jul-2003
Marie & Pierre Curie’s granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, visits the United States
Jefferson Lab science writer Melanie O'Byrne spoke with Langevin-Joliot during the recent International Symposium for Spinal Radiography at Georgetown University. In the following excerpt, she discusses her work, passion for science, and remarkable family history. She is a respected nuclear physicist from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Orsay, the laboratory set up by her parents, Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie, who won a Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

9-May-2003
Burning plasma: the future of fusion energy
Almost all activities on the surface of the earth are ultimately powered by the sun, whether by today's sunshine or by fossil fuels formed millions of years ago.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
NREL wins research and development awards
The laboratory's three R&D 100 Awards for 2002 are for the PSS Coating System; a solar power system that produces electricity while still allowing sunlight to pass through it; and an incredibly thin ceramic fiber that effectively filters out bacteria and viruses and can enhance the performance of composite materials.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@prodigy.net
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
Tiny utility is big on wind energy
Waverly Light and Power began investing in renewable energy by installing the first utility-scale wind turbine in Iowa. This program, which certain energy "experts" thought was not feasible, has helped lead the way for wind energy development across the Midwest and was awarded the 2002 Paul Rappaport Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Award.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
PV manager finds permanent home in America
Photovoltaics Program Manager Tom Surek has called many places home during his life, but it took the events of September 11 to make Surek realize where he really belongs.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@prodigy.net
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Need for transportation technologies heads into overdrive
The transportation industry faces several challenges relating to vehicle fuel efficiency, regulated emissions and global warming. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Jud Virden talks about technologies being developed for transportation and how they fit into the nation's priorities relating to petroleum imports, global climate change, and environmental and health effects of emissions. Virden oversees the Laboratory's involvement in the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies program and other vehicle technology research.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Exhaustive research on emissions technologies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting fundamental scientific research that could help vehicles meet the EPA's aggressive emissions requirements.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Opportunity NOx
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers put their expertise in surface science and catalysis to work when they developed an effective plasma catalysis system for treating engine exhaust one of the first advanced emissions control technologies developed by the Laboratory.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Modeling for success
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's unique approach to computational modeling with solid oxide fuel cells combines computational chemistry codes, computational fluid dynamics and computational mechanics. It allows PNNL researchers to study not only the electrochemical reactions in fuel cells, but also how the electrochemical reactions interact with fuel cell design.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Fuel cells for transportation
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing fuel cells that use a vehicle's existing fuel supply to provide auxiliary power for creature comforts, such as air-conditioning, keeping drinks cold in mini-refrigerators and viewing DVDs--all without running the vehicle's engine or draining its battery.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

26-Aug-2002
NREL 25th Anniversary
At the foot of a rocky mesa on the outskirts of Golden, Colo., a small cadre of scientists and engineers gathered on July 5, 1977 to launch DOE's Solar Energy Research Institute, a federal facility dedicated to harnessing power from the sun. They had high hopes and a pioneering spirit. This year, some of those same pioneers are celebrating the 25th anniversary of their ambitious endeavor, today known as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
303-275-4050
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Energy system savings stack up
An energy management system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and installed at a New York Housing Authority boiler plant in Manhattan has led to cost savings of more than $300,000 in the first year.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

25-Jul-2002
Imaging system visualizes plasma turbulence
Researchers from three laboratories funded by the U. S. Department of Energy have captured high-resolution images of instabilities that cause heat to leak rapidly from the plasma edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Alcator C-Mod fusion experiments. Advanced imaging cameras were used to freeze plasma action at a rate of up to 1 million frames per second.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
Wallace recognized for work in China
NREL's Bill Wallace was awarded the 2001 Chinese National Friendship Award for his outstanding contributions towards the long-term development of renewable energy in China. The Friendship Award is the highest-level state award that can be given to foreign experts in China. In 2001, 50 foreign experts from 17 countries were recognized in ceremonies conducted during the national celebration of the 52nd anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
NREL sponsors Habitat House in honor of anniversary
The Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's managing partners, Midwest Research Institute (MRI), Battelle and Bechtel, are sponsoring the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home by providing the sponsorship fee. NREL's commitment calls for 3,000 volunteer hours to help build the house. Volunteers will be recruited from NREL and DOE staff, friends and family members.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

20-May-2002
Pipe locating sensor could help prevent natural gas leaks
A new flat plate sensor being developed by DOE and the Gas Technology Institute could pinpoint underground natural gas pipes before they can be accidentally damaged by "third party" construction crews.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

Showing stories 151-175 out of 224 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>


 

 

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