U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 176-200 out of 228 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>


25-Jul-2002
Imaging system visualizes plasma turbulence
Researchers from three laboratories funded by the U. S. Department of Energy have captured high-resolution images of instabilities that cause heat to leak rapidly from the plasma edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Alcator C-Mod fusion experiments. Advanced imaging cameras were used to freeze plasma action at a rate of up to 1 million frames per second.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
Wallace recognized for work in China
NREL's Bill Wallace was awarded the 2001 Chinese National Friendship Award for his outstanding contributions towards the long-term development of renewable energy in China. The Friendship Award is the highest-level state award that can be given to foreign experts in China. In 2001, 50 foreign experts from 17 countries were recognized in ceremonies conducted during the national celebration of the 52nd anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
NREL sponsors Habitat House in honor of anniversary
The Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's managing partners, Midwest Research Institute (MRI), Battelle and Bechtel, are sponsoring the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home by providing the sponsorship fee. NREL's commitment calls for 3,000 volunteer hours to help build the house. Volunteers will be recruited from NREL and DOE staff, friends and family members.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

20-May-2002
Pipe locating sensor could help prevent natural gas leaks
A new flat plate sensor being developed by DOE and the Gas Technology Institute could pinpoint underground natural gas pipes before they can be accidentally damaged by "third party" construction crews.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

10-May-2002
Near-frictionless carbon coating nears commercial applications
Four years and more than 3,000 phone calls and e-mail contacts later, Argonne's "near-frictionless carbon" coating stands on the brink of commercialization. A sample of the coating on a sapphire substrate survived 17.5 million passes of a steel ball. After 32 days, the testing machine failed, but the ball left only a barely visible track on the coating.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
New ceramic membranes may help hydrogen replace gasoline as auto fuel
If hydrogen fuel cells are ever to replace gasoline engines in cars, they will need a cheap source of high-purity hydrogen -- and Argonne technology could provide one. Argonne's Energy Technology Division has developed a ceramic membrane that can extract hydrogen from methane, the chief component of natural gas.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
The question
This response to a Fermilab employee's email examines the reasons why particle physics research is done and how both Fermilab particle physicists and others perceive its value for our nation and the world.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Mar-2002
Sonic waves help recover natural gas from clogged storage sites
A new device that cleans scale from a well bore using high-intensity sound waves has shown significant promise in its first field trials. Researchers are now readying the device for more tests that could lead to the technology's commercial introduction.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Mar-2002
DOE kicks off 'deep trek' to develop deeper, smarter drilling technology
Initiative Will Develop "Smart" Drilling System for Deep Gas To meet the Nation's growing demand for natural gas, drillers will likely have to probe deeper into more hostile formations to find new gas supplies. To develop a new high-tech "smart" drilling system that can tap into deep reservoirs, the Department of Energy is beginning "Deep Trek." A solicitation is now available to developers who are interested in proposing "Deep Trek" drilling and completion concepts.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

12-Mar-2002
New projects to study ways to recover vast quantities of 'left behind' oil
To produce hard-to-get oil once it is located, the Department also plans to award three new contracts to improve the effectiveness of oil production technologies.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

12-Mar-2002
New projects to help operators 'see' oil, gas formations more clearly
To develop better ways for producers to "see" promising oil-bearing formations, DOE has selected six new projects to develop advanced diagnostics and imaging technologies.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

6-Mar-2002
New projects to explore 'breakthrough' ideas for capturing, storing carbon gases
As part of its efforts to develop "breakthrough" approaches for reducing the threat of global climate change, the Department has added three new projects to develop ways to capture carbon dioxide released from power plants and safely prevent it from entering the atmosphere.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic components—lipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
Providing technical aid to small producers in America's oil fields
Fracturing, New Computer Imaging Focus of Recent DOE Selections More than half of America's oil production from the lower 48 States is supplied by small independent producers. As these companies become increasingly important to America's energy security, the Energy Department continues to provide grants for the smallest of these producers to test better technologies that can keep their wells pumping.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Feb-2002
Cracking the mystery of cracks
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have performed first-of-a-kind, high-resolution examinations of cracks in stainless steel core components from commercial nuclear reactors, dispelling many of the traditionally held beliefs about how cracks develop and spread.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Painless physics: a particle dialogue
What are electrons, protons and neutrons, how do we define them, how do they fit into the theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model—and how do we use them to explore the subatomic world?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Dirty coal, clean power
Iver Anderson thinks the solution to the rolling power blackouts in California and parts of the East Coast may lie under the rolling black soil of Iowa’s farm country. "Iowa is sitting on top of huge deposits of coal," says Anderson, an Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist. "The problem is that it’s high-sulfur, dirty coal." Anderson and colleagues Bob Terspstra and Brian Gleeson are closing in on a new material to filter the nasty ashes and dust that result from burning "dirty" coal.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
But enough about high-energy physics...
As U.S. high-energy physicists chart the course for their future, they must first reach agreement among themselves on a road map to the revolutionary new physics that nearly all agree lies ahead.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 176-200 out of 228 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>


 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map