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Features Archive

Showing stories 176-200 out of 213 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

1-Feb-2002
Painless physics: a particle dialogue
What are electrons, protons and neutrons, how do we define them, how do they fit into the theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model—and how do we use them to explore the subatomic world?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Dirty coal, clean power
Iver Anderson thinks the solution to the rolling power blackouts in California and parts of the East Coast may lie under the rolling black soil of Iowa’s farm country. "Iowa is sitting on top of huge deposits of coal," says Anderson, an Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist. "The problem is that it’s high-sulfur, dirty coal." Anderson and colleagues Bob Terspstra and Brian Gleeson are closing in on a new material to filter the nasty ashes and dust that result from burning "dirty" coal.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
But enough about high-energy physics...
As U.S. high-energy physicists chart the course for their future, they must first reach agreement among themselves on a road map to the revolutionary new physics that nearly all agree lies ahead.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Run II well under control
On March 1, Collider Run II began at Fermilab. It is a six-year enterprise to produce a record number of proton-antiproton collisions using the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Tevatron.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Gravity in large extra dimensions
n 1998, Nima Arkani-Hamed found himself pondering one of the conundrums of modern physics: why is gravity so much weaker than the other fundamental forces? Surrounded by massive objects like falling apples, orbiting moons, and our own occasionally clumsy bodies, we don't think of gravity as weak. Compared to electromagnetism, however-or the aptly named strong force that binds quarks, or even the "weak" force that governs some forms of radioactive decay-gravity is feeble.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Award-winning gasoline reformer is a catalyst for change
Instead of spark plugs and cylinders, environmentally friendly fuel cell engines may be under the hoods of the cars of the future. But first, scientists must find a practical and economical way to supply the hydrogen gas needed to power them. Chemical engineers at Argonne have developed and patented a compact fuel processor that “reforms” ordinary gasoline into a hydrogen-rich gas to power fuel cells.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Insuring safety in future nuclear power systems
A research project to help ensure the safety of future nuclear power systems is being awarded $940,000 funding for a three-phase project under the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Contributing to a nuclear renaissance
The Laboratory is launching an Advanced Nuclear Science and Technology Initiative (ANSTI), under the leadership of senior scientist Leonard Bond. "Nuclear science and technology is a major component of the Laboratory's current activities," Bond said. "ANSTI is building on our existing capabilities to support a national nuclear renaissance."

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
On ALERT for energy savings
In early 2001, Pacific Northwest's Michael Kintner-Meyer developed the concept for the program later identified as ALERT—Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques. His idea was to conduct assessments of federal facilities to identify and implement low-cost or no-cost measures to reduce energy demand and consumption when California's energy system is at its peak, minimizing the potential for blackouts.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Refrigerators may help keep the lights on
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a prototype of a device that may become the heart of grid-friendly appliances that can respond to critical conditions of the electrical system.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Water and energy — managing powerful partners
The millions of gallons of water in the mighty Columbia River are a valuable resource that serves many purposes in the Pacific Northwest — hydropower generation, fish and wildlife habitat, fish hatcheries and agricultural irrigation. The challenge, however, is to manage the river system in such a way that balances and optimizes the river's numerous uses.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Energy — A system in transformation
Steve Hauser, senior account manager for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Energy Science and Technology Division, is leading activities that could help address the current energy crisis and may change the way the nation thinks about the energy system. We talked to him about the transforming energy system.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

26-Aug-2001
University of Michigan wins the great solar car race
The University of Michigan's solar car, M-Pulse, cruised to victory in the American Solar Challenge on July 25, crossing the finish line at 11:37 a.m., after traveling 2,300 miles using only the energy of the sun.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
Mysterious material has unusual electrical properties
In the July 27, 2001, issue of Science magazine, the scientists describe findings that offer the first clues to explain the material's newly discovered, unusual electrical properties. This work may lead to applications using the material to store electrical charge in high-performance capacitors, and offer insight into how charges behave on the nanoscale-on the order of billionths of a meter.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Riding the d-wave
A paper appearing in a recent issue of the journal Nature has helped validate a theory on the enigmatic nature of superconducting materials that was first advanced by Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Alexander Balatsky and his colleagues five years ago. The confirmation of the theory is another step in solving the enigma of superconductivity.

Contact: Alexander Balatsky
avb@lanl.gov
505-665-0077
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
The magnetic universe
Researchers in Applied Physics and Theory Divisions have recently compiled a sample of nearly 100 giant radio galaxies powered by black holes.

Contact: Hui Li
li@nis-mail.lanl.gov
505-665-3131
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
The great solar car race: Cars will race along Route 66 without a drop of gas
As many as 40 race cars will leave Chicago July 15 in the first-ever attempt to travel America's historic Route 66 without spending a penny on gasoline. In a year that has seen unpredictable energy and gasoline prices, these drivers are betting that sunshine will take them all the way to Los Angeles, a feat that has never been tried in the 75-year history of the highway.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing stories 176-200 out of 213 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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