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Features Archive


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27-Feb-2015
Innovative, lower cost sensors and controls yield better energy efficiency
Buildings are responsible for about 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States. Studies indicate that advanced sensors and controls have the potential to reduce the energy consumption of buildings by 20-30 percent.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-241-2074
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

26-Feb-2015
A new X-ray microscope for nanoscale imaging
A new microscope at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at NSLS-II will ultimately deliver nanoscale resolution imaging for everything from proteins to fuel cell catalysts.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

23-Feb-2015
Zeolites: The inside story
Zeolites have been used for decades as catalysts and in other industrial applications, but the molecular transformations occurring within the porous material is not well understood. Scientists from universities, national laboratories and industries are using EMSL's staff expertise and advanced instrumentation to gain an atomic-level understanding of these materials to improve energy production and address environmental issues.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

20-Feb-2015
New programs enhance SIMES role in studying exotic new materials
Two new three-year research projects are supporting the role of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) as a leading center for studying exotic new materials that could enable future innovative electronic and photonic applications. SIMES is a joint institute of Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Feb-2015
Semiconductor works better when hitched to graphene
Graphene -- a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon with highly desirable electrical properties, flexibility and strength -- shows great promise for future electronics, advanced solar cells, protective coatings and other uses, and combining it with other materials could extend its range even further.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Feb-2015
Three young scientists will conduct research at Jefferson Lab
Outstanding academic accomplishments have earned three young scientists funds to conduct part of their thesis research at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Va.

Contact: Deb Magaldi
magaldi@jlab.org
Doe-Anderson

6-Feb-2015
Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates the world's brightest Synchrotron Light Source
US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the world's most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The NSLS-II is a $912-million DOE Office of Science User Facility that produces extremely bright beams of x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light used to examine a wide range of materials, including superconductors and catalysts, geological samples, and biological proteins to accelerate advances in energy, environmental science, and medicine.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Feb-2015
Five ways to put tiny targets in front of an X-ray laser
X-ray devices have long been used to see the inner structure of things, from bone breaks in the human body to the contents of luggage at airport security checkpoints. But to see life's chemistry and exotic materials at the scale of individual atoms, you need a far more powerful X-ray device. Enter the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Jan-2015
SLAC welcomes professor and Chemical Sciences Division director Tony Heinz
Tony Heinz, a scientist known for exploring the properties of nanoscale materials and developing important new tools for that exploration, has joined the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as a professor of photon science and Stanford University as a professor of applied physics. He will also lead the SLAC Chemical Sciences Division.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Jan-2015
Water, water, everywhere -- Controlling the properties of nanomaterials
Properties of water molecules on the surface of metal oxides can be used to better control these minerals and use them to make products such as more efficient semiconductors for organic light emitting diodes and solar cells, safer vehicle glass in fog and frost, and more environmentally friendly chemical sensors for industrial applications.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jan-2015
2014's top-10 scientific achievements at Brookhaven Lab
From new insights into the building blocks of matter to advances in understanding batteries, superconductors, and a protein that could help fight cancer, 2014 was a year of stunning successes for the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

19-Dec-2014
First direct evidence that a phase of matter competes with high-temperature superconductivity
Scientists have found the first direct evidence that a mysterious phase of matter known as the 'pseudogap' competes with high-temperature superconductivity, robbing it of electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Dec-2014
Crown ethers flatten in graphene for strong, specific binding
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has discovered a way to dramatically increase the selectivity and binding strength of crown ethers by incorporating them within a rigid framework of graphene. Strong, specific electrostatic binding of crown ethers may advance sensors, chemical separations, nuclear-waste cleanup, extraction of metals from ores, purification and recycling of rare-earth elements, water purification, biotechnology, energy production in durable lithium-ion batteries, catalysis, medicine and data storage.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Dec-2014
Studies look at long-term aging of electronics in nuclear weapons
Researchers have studied radiation effects since the early days of nuclear weapons. But a 30-year program Sandia National Laboratories began in 2006 will provide real-time data for the first time on how electronics age within a weapon.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

4-Dec-2014
Rattled atoms mimic high-temperature superconductivity
An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity -- a long-sought phenomenon in which materials might conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency under everyday conditions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Dec-2014
Optimized algorithms boost combustion research
Turbulent combustion simulations, used in the design of more fuel-efficient combustion systems, have gotten their own efficiency boost, thanks to researchers from Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division. They developed new algorithmic features that streamline turbulent flame simulations, which are commonly used in the design of combustion systems such as diesel engines; after testing the enhanced code on NERSC supercomputers, they were able to achieve dramatic improvements in simulation times, which will help reduce the time -- and thus the cost -- of designing new engines.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Nov-2014
Agreement gives energy storage companies easier access to SLAC
More than a dozen energy-storage companies now have streamlined access to research facilities and expertise at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory under a new cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Nov-2014
Your own energy 'island'? ORNL microgrid could standardize small, self-sustaining electric grids
Benefit of microgrids -- small systems powered by renewables and energy storage devices.

Contact: Katie Jones
joneske1@ornl.gov
865-241-6088
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Oct-2014
Iron-based superconductor simulations spin out new possibilities on Titan
Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of Titan supercomputer to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

Contact: Katie Jones
joneske1@ornl.gov
865-241-6088
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Oct-2014
Toyota to use Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials to advance vehicle battery tech
Toyota scientists will collaborate with Brookhaven experts and use world-leading electron microscopes to explore the real-time electrochemical reactions in promising new batteries.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

29-Oct-2014
SLAC's earliest websites reappear in 'Stanford Wayback'
The Stanford University Libraries have restored the earliest websites of the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and made them available to browse once again.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Oct-2014
Silicon shovels for rare-Earth solutions
Office of Science scientists are using supercomputers to search for innovative answers to rare-earth supply needs.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

28-Oct-2014
Tracking heat-driven decay in leading electric vehicle batteries
Scientists from Brookhaven National Lab reveal the atomic-scale structural and electronic degradations that plague some rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and make them vulnerable during high-temperature operations.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

23-Oct-2014
National Synchrotron Light Source II achieves 'first light'
The National Synchrotron Light Source II detects its first photons, beginning a new phase of the facility's operations. Scientific experiments at NSLS-II are expected to begin before the end of the year.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

20-Oct-2014
Puzzling new behavior found in high-temperature superconductors
Research by an international team led by SLAC and Stanford scientists has uncovered a new, unpredicted behavior in a copper oxide material that becomes superconducting -- conducting electricity without any loss -- at relatively high temperatures.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

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