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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 151-175 out of 496 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

12-Jun-2006
Managing the Soviet legacy
An intact nuclear weapon is stolen and detonated. A terrorist group somehow steals, purchases, or produces fissile material and fabricates a crude bomb, called an improvised nuclear device, which the group threatens to detonate if its demands are not met.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Science for security
Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, national security has become a priority mission of the Department of Energy. This mission, which in addition to public safety focuses on the protection of America's economic and energy security assets, is supported by an increasingly robust program of technological innovation.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

13-Feb-2006
Brookhaven scientists aid in homeland security field study
If an industrial accident or a terrorist act released dangerous contaminants into the atmosphere in New York City, the city's first responders would have to decide quickly whether people should shelter in place or be evacuated, and what evacuation routes should be considered. In the future they will be aided in making those decisions by information gathered during the New York City Urban Dispersion Program field studies, conducted in the city's urban canyons in March and August of 2005.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

13-Feb-2006
Mimicking nature's crystalline structures
Scientists and engineers have long envied nature's ability to design crystalline structures whose properties are often superior to those of similar synthetic materials. Through a process called biomineralization, proteins orchestrate the growth processes of many natural minerals into designs that confer exceptional properties.

Contact: Jim De Yoreo
deyoreo1@llnl.gov
925-423-4240
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Jan-2006
eco-science
Stepping onto the site of a physics laboratory, you might expect to see enormous accelerators, ultra-powerful supercomputers, or scientists in lab coats racing between experiments. At one lab, however, what you will actually see are goats. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, goats roam through the hills, push over fences, and climb trees.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

20-Dec-2005
Knowledge centers: Sweet suites of informational tools
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has created a new way to manage scientific research and deal with the resulting information overload. Three types of knowledge centers -- science-based, technology-based and mission-based -- are tackling the daunting tasks of collecting, managing, visualizing, analyzing, distributing and storing massive data accumulations using unique software products.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Data-intensive computing to large science discoveries
The advancement in computing technology has enabled scientists to collect massive amounts of data, taking us a step closer to solving complex problems such as global climate change and uncovering the secrets hidden in genes. The exponential growth in the amount of data collected in research, however, has created an urgent technical challenge.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Innovative tools for high-performance computing
Solving complex scientific problems requires not only advanced high-performance supercomputers but also innovative software programs that can discover patterns and integrate data across different space and time scales. Researchers at PNNL are creating innovative software and processes to do just that.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Computational biology enabling new discoveries to solve complex global problems
Ask any experienced do-it-yourselfer or professional and they'll tell you the importance of using the "right tool for the right job." At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD), the right tools are powerful high-speed computer systems that are analyzing vast amounts of data and enabling scientists to discover solutions to many complex global problems.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-375-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Cyber security
Do you worry about the security of your credit card when you buy something over the Internet? Or when you pay your bills electronically? What about business trade secrets communicated by email from engineering to manufacturing staff or sensitive data stored on local hard drives? Computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using a systems approach combined with a multidisciplinary team of experts to address cyber security issues such as these.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
NVAC: Visualizing a safer homeland
September 11, 2001 forever changed how Americans view national security. The responsibility for protecting citizens from future attacks has fallen on government shoulders in an increasingly discontented world. One way the Department of Homeland Security has responded is with new visual analytic technologies that transform volumes of documents, emails, images, videos and voice recordings into interactive visuals.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Ames Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Environmental biomarkers provide early warning of disease
Outbreaks of Avian flu or "bird flu" during the past several years have disrupted the poultry industry. More ominous is that the virus spreads to humans. The ability to identify this disease early on may help prevent epidemics that wreak havoc on a country's economy and take lives. Now, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, through the multi-year Environmental Biomarkers Initiative (EBI), are developing new techniques and tools for identifying these early warning signals also known as environmental biomarkers.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A limitless potential
Researchers believe carbon nanotubes may prove to be the most promising nanoscale materials for multifunctional applications. These hollow tubes of carbon often have multiple, concentric layers of carbon sheets, like rings of a tree. A single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)--one sheet of carbon atoms rolled into a tube--has special properties resulting from a structure much more like that of a one-dimensional molecule than bulk graphite.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A new attraction
Jian Shen, a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Technology in 2004, is a research theme leader at the Department of Energy's Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences. Many predict that Shen's novel techniques for growing and studying magnetic nanostructures will attract a growing number of guest scientists to ORNL's new nanocenter.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
Biological tubes to serve as miniature drug capsules
By mixing two common cell ingredients, scientists have assembled tiny hollow tubes whose ends can be open or closed, giving them great potential to serve as drug capsules thousands of times thinner than a human hair, but still 10 times wider than a gene.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

22-Aug-2005
The search for methane in Earth's mantle
Petroleum geologists have long searched beneath Earth's surface for oil and gas, knowing that hydrocarbons form from the decomposition of plants and animals buried over time.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Office of Science Director Orbach outlines bright future for SLAC
Raymond Orbach, director of the Office of Science at the Department of Energy, lavished praise on SLAC's past accomplishments and promising future during a special address Thursday on the Lab's Green.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Pushing the boundaries of high-temperature superconductors
A collaboration led by scientists at BNL has revealed a new mechanism that explains why adding calcium to a high-temperature superconductor increases its current-carrying capacity.

Contact: Bulletin Editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-May-2005
Addressing national security needs benefits energy and environment
Lawrence Livermore's Energy and Environment Directorate conducts a wide range of research projects in the geologic, atmospheric, and environmental sciences to address challenges in national security, environmental remediation, and energy supply.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Apr-2005
Moving electrons at molecular, nanometer scales
Learning how to control the movement of electrons on the molecular and nanometer scales could help scientists devise small-scale circuits for many applications, including more efficient ways of storing and using solar energy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Apr-2005
Ultra-fast science succeeds at SLAC
The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) collaboration has published data from the first experiments ever using a linear accelerator-based femtosecond x-ray source, and has developed an important tool for ultra-fast science. SPPS makes the world's shortest bunches of electrons in the SLAC linear accelerator and turns them into very bright pulses of x-ray light one thousand times shorter than those made in synchrotron rings like SPEAR3.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 151-175 out of 496 stories.
<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

 

 

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