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Features Archive

Showing stories 176-200 out of 512 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

2-Dec-2005
Cyber security
Do you worry about the security of your credit card when you buy something over the Internet? Or when you pay your bills electronically? What about business trade secrets communicated by email from engineering to manufacturing staff or sensitive data stored on local hard drives? Computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using a systems approach combined with a multidisciplinary team of experts to address cyber security issues such as these.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
NVAC: Visualizing a safer homeland
September 11, 2001 forever changed how Americans view national security. The responsibility for protecting citizens from future attacks has fallen on government shoulders in an increasingly discontented world. One way the Department of Homeland Security has responded is with new visual analytic technologies that transform volumes of documents, emails, images, videos and voice recordings into interactive visuals.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Ames Laboratory

2-Dec-2005
Environmental biomarkers provide early warning of disease
Outbreaks of Avian flu or "bird flu" during the past several years have disrupted the poultry industry. More ominous is that the virus spreads to humans. The ability to identify this disease early on may help prevent epidemics that wreak havoc on a country's economy and take lives. Now, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, through the multi-year Environmental Biomarkers Initiative (EBI), are developing new techniques and tools for identifying these early warning signals also known as environmental biomarkers.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A limitless potential
Researchers believe carbon nanotubes may prove to be the most promising nanoscale materials for multifunctional applications. These hollow tubes of carbon often have multiple, concentric layers of carbon sheets, like rings of a tree. A single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)--one sheet of carbon atoms rolled into a tube--has special properties resulting from a structure much more like that of a one-dimensional molecule than bulk graphite.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A new attraction
Jian Shen, a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Technology in 2004, is a research theme leader at the Department of Energy's Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences. Many predict that Shen's novel techniques for growing and studying magnetic nanostructures will attract a growing number of guest scientists to ORNL's new nanocenter.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
Biological tubes to serve as miniature drug capsules
By mixing two common cell ingredients, scientists have assembled tiny hollow tubes whose ends can be open or closed, giving them great potential to serve as drug capsules thousands of times thinner than a human hair, but still 10 times wider than a gene.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2005
Asymmetric insight
Like climbers assessing a new route before making the ascent, physicists have been looking for footholds on a vertiginous new terrain. These footholds contain important information for trekking to TeV heights (the lofty trillion electron volts energy scales of future colliders).

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

22-Aug-2005
The search for methane in Earth's mantle
Petroleum geologists have long searched beneath Earth's surface for oil and gas, knowing that hydrocarbons form from the decomposition of plants and animals buried over time.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Office of Science Director Orbach outlines bright future for SLAC
Raymond Orbach, director of the Office of Science at the Department of Energy, lavished praise on SLAC's past accomplishments and promising future during a special address Thursday on the Lab's Green.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Jul-2005
Pushing the boundaries of high-temperature superconductors
A collaboration led by scientists at BNL has revealed a new mechanism that explains why adding calcium to a high-temperature superconductor increases its current-carrying capacity.

Contact: Bulletin Editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-May-2005
Addressing national security needs benefits energy and environment
Lawrence Livermore's Energy and Environment Directorate conducts a wide range of research projects in the geologic, atmospheric, and environmental sciences to address challenges in national security, environmental remediation, and energy supply.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Apr-2005
Moving electrons at molecular, nanometer scales
Learning how to control the movement of electrons on the molecular and nanometer scales could help scientists devise small-scale circuits for many applications, including more efficient ways of storing and using solar energy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

18-Apr-2005
Ultra-fast science succeeds at SLAC
The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) collaboration has published data from the first experiments ever using a linear accelerator-based femtosecond x-ray source, and has developed an important tool for ultra-fast science. SPPS makes the world's shortest bunches of electrons in the SLAC linear accelerator and turns them into very bright pulses of x-ray light one thousand times shorter than those made in synchrotron rings like SPEAR3.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Apr-2005
Sandia Labs undergoes management changes
The Sandia Corporation Board of Directors has named Dr. Thomas O. Hunter President of Sandia Corporation and Director of Sandia National Laboratories, effective April 29. Hunter most recently has served as Sandia's senior vice president for Defense Programs, with oversight of the labs nuclear weapons programs.

Contact: Chris Miller
cmiller@sandia.gov
505-844-0587
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

11-Apr-2005
Director of global design effort announced at international linear collider workshop
The 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop kicked off March 18 by announcing the director for the newly formed Global Design Effort (GDE) for the proposed electron-positron collider.

Contact: Heather Rock Woods
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Apr-2005
X-ray blaze on an invisible world
The way that a horse trots intrigued Leland Stanford. After a term as California's governor and with a fortune assembled from building the US transcontinental railway, Stanford lived the life of a country gentleman near his Palo Alto Stock Farm.

Contact: Heather Rock Woods
hrwoods@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Apr-2005
Science from a hole in the ground
When Alice famously went down the rabbit hole, she ended up in Wonderland. Now, a group of US scientists from fields as diverse as microbiology and particle physics, rock mechanics and molecular evolution are proposing to go down their own version of the rabbit hole into the scientific wonderland of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

1-Apr-2005
Cesium capsules hit cancer harder
A shorter half-life and cesium radiation promise to make cesium-131 capsules harder on cancer and easier on the patient.

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2005
Smart building controls may solve energy problems
Can information technology and smart building controls reduce the need for expensive new electricity transmission lines?

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2005
Science-driven computing speeds up at PNNL
One of the world's fastest scientific computers will be used by a new directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable large-scale scientific discoveries.

Contact: Breakthroughs
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Mar-2005
Understanding the mysteries of high-temperature superconductors
High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) operate in mysterious ways, but scientists are starting to understand their peculiarities by using a state-of-the-art spectroscopy system at SSRL.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Mar-2005
Shaping future
In its next-generation aircraft carrier, the Navy, with assistance from Sandia, is seeking to reduce manpower by 10 to 30 percent, but not by heaping more work on individual sailors. The goal is to use increased technology and improvements to carrier air wing flight operations, maintenance, and support functions to reduce the overall workload per sailor.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-284-5325
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Showing stories 176-200 out of 512 stories.
<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

 

 

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