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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 495 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

10-Dec-2004
Fastest gun in the West
SLAC partnered with CalTech, Fermilab, CERN and the University of Florida, along with groups from the UK, Brazil and Korea to defend its title as one of the fastest guns in the West--or, more accurately, the largest bandwidth, which is the computing equivalent.

Contact: SLAC
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Dec-2004
Nonproliferation: Traditional and nontraditional approaches
Tom Shea and Carol Kessler discuss the issues involved in nonproliferation and international nuclear arms.

Contact: PNNL Laboratory
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Dec-2004
Big project reveals secrets of tiny materials
A big project studying the characteristics of the very small will provide insight into new materials with unprecedented properties. These small systems can be only a few atoms wide and are measured in billionths of meters, or nanometers.

Contact: Rich Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Keeping the power on by linking the grid
On the afternoon of August 14, 2003, an estimated 50 million people in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and part of Canada suddenly lost electric power in a blackout that lasted up to four days in some areas. The massive outage represented 61,800 megawatts of lost power, cost the United States an estimated $10 billion, and drew attention to a critical need for improved power system reliability.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Laser burrows into the Earth to destroy land mines
ONE of the great scourges of warfare is the land mine. Although an effective battlefield weapon, land mines kill or maim nearly 45,000 civilians (including 20,000 children) worldwide every year.

Contact: Mark Rotter
rotter1@llnl.gov
925-422-8370
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
PNNL technology closes the 'lid' on Chevy Malibu Maxx
A technology first optimized at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been applied by General Motors to the liftgate of the 2004 Chevy Malibu Maxx.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Oct-2004
Pacific Northwest blazing big trail in small world
Last month's Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference in Portland brought together an amalgamation of national and international technology experts, with organizers hoping to convince them of a large future in the Pacific Northwest for tiny technology.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Researchers 'redesigning' platinum
Researchers have developed a way of changing the properties of platinum by manipulating the metal at the nanoscale. The method mimics the action of photosynthetic proteins.

Contact: Chris Burroughs
coburro@sandia.gov
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Sep-2004
Cold Molecules - New avenue to the 5th phase of matter
Using a method usually more suitable to billiards than atomic physics, researchers from Sandia and Columbia University have created extremely cold molecules that could be used as an improved first step in creating molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Sep-2004
Virtual problem solving for homeland security
Probing attack on the water treatment plant! The mayor and other emergency responders evacuate schools, respond to medical emergencies, and pursue the perpetrators. Fortunately for the town of Opelika, Alabama, the attack was purely hypothetical.

Contact: Rob Hills
hills1@llnl.gov
925-423-7344
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Exploring the ultrawideband
Lawrence Livermore research efforts and inventions quietly advance many fields. In one instance, however, a Livermore invention that stemmed from laser research has spawned a variety of new commercial products, including some that support national and homeland security.

Contact: Steve Azevedo
azevedo3@lln.gov
925-422-8538
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Echoes of the past in silicon chips
Thermal oxide is the real on-off switch for your computer. The nanometers-thick film on the surface of silicon transistors helps turn on and off the flow of electricity through the transistor, providing the 0 and 1 binary signals modern electronics run on. There are several million transistors on each computer chip.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
SPEAR3 project wins DOE award for excellence
On August 13, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Excellence in Acquisition Award to the SPEAR3 Management team in a ceremony at the DOE headquarters in Washington, DC. The Fourth Annual DOE Project Management Awards pay tribute to those teams or individuals who have achieved outstanding results through resourceful, innovative thinking and implementation.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/US Department of Energy

16-Sep-2004
Director's corner: SLAC has a unique contribution to make to international linear collider
As many of you know, the worldwide high energy physics community has reached an important milestone on the path to building an electron-positron linear collider, a facility that will unlock some of nature's greatest mysteries.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Sep-2004
Radiation detection on the front lines
If you think a device that resembles a cellular phone but detects a potential nuclear threat and transmits a description of the nuclear material to every nearby crisis center sounds like something out of a James Bond movie, you are in for a surprise. Since the 1930s, when scientists first used the Geiger counter, radiation detection equipment has gone through an amazing evolution in size, sensitivity, deployability, and power.

Contact: Simon Labov
labov1@llnl.gov
925-423-3818
DOE/US Department of Energy

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotractor' studies micro-scale friction
Interest in the development of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) has grown steadily during the past decade. These tiny devices, now used in such applications as auto airbag systems, inkjet printers, and display units, are attractive because they take up little space and require little or no assembly. They also are cheap to produce in batch quantities because they are made with a technology that is already mature -- the microlithography used to make silicon chips.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-844-9509
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotools' - Self-assembling durable nanocrystal arrays
A wish list for nanotechnologists would likely include a simple, inexpensive means of self-assembling nanocrystals into robust, orderly arrangements, like soup cans on a shelf or bricks in a wall, each separated from the next by an insulating layer of silicon dioxide.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

24-Aug-2004
Fine-tuning carbon nanotubes
Since their discovery in the 1990s, carbon nanotubes have ensnared the imagination of chemists. Among them are researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who are putting these fine filaments--ten-thousand times smaller than a hair--to work as biosensors and improving the way carbon nanotubes can be chemically customized to form the basis for a wide variety of devices.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
MercuryŚwatch out!
An innovative sponge-like material that can "absorb" more than half its weight in contaminants from waste streams has been developed by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Nanoparticles may mean longer life for enzymes
The biochemical world's workaholic is the enzyme. Enzymes are molecules in cells that lead short, active and brutal lives. They restlessly catalyze their neighbors, cleaving and assembling proteins and metabolizing compounds. After a few hours of furious activity, they are what chemists call "destabilized," or spent.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Thin films enable next-generation displays
You've finished working on your computer and you're ready to call it a day. Instead of logging off and folding the screen down over a laptop keyboard, imagine rolling up the computer screen and stashing it in your bag. Roll-up computer screens and other flexible light-emitting displays that conform to almost any shape or surface may one day be realities thanks to a team of scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Supercritical fluidsŚmaking nanoparticles easy
It's not a liquid. It's not a gas. It's a supercritical fluid. Although it looks like a liquid, it has unique properties that allow scientists to work with it in ways they can't with liquids. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using supercritical fluids as solvents in a process that creates nanoparticles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
From cosmetics to hydrogen storageŚnanoscale materials push the frontier
Suresh Baskaran develops new projects in advanced materials and manufacturing technology. This includes materials and manufacturing technology for new applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion, vehicular structures, sensors and emissions control.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
PNNL co-leads Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, will lead a new national Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The new center is a step toward a "hydrogen economy"--an economy based not on the fossil fuels we use today, but on clean, abundant hydrogen fuels. It is one of three Department of Energy "Centers of Excellence" aimed at enabling use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 495 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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