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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 530 stories.
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17-Jun-2014
Novel nanoparticle production method could lead to better lights, lenses, solar cells
Two Sandia researchers have come up with a way to make titanium-dioxide nanoparticles, which have a variety of uses in everything from solar cells to LEDs. Titanium-dioxide nanoparticles show great promise, but industry has largely shunned them in the past because they've been difficult and expensive to make.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Jun-2014
Ames Laboratory scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process
Using the second fastest supercomputer in the world, a scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is attempting to develop a more efficient process for purifying rare-earth materials.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

29-May-2014
Get ready for the computers of the future
Sandia experts expect multiple computing device-level technologies in the future, rather than one dominant architecture. About a dozen possible next-generation candidates exist, including tunnel FETs (field effect transistors, in which the output current is controlled by a variable electric field), carbon nanotubes, superconductors and fundamentally new approaches, such as quantum computing and brain-inspired computing.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

29-May-2014
Scientists pinpoint creeping nanocrystals behind lithium-ion battery degradation
Scientists from several US Department of Energy national laboratories -- Lawrence Berkeley, Brookhaven, SLAC, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory -- mapped the nanoscale dynamics of lithium-ion charge cycles and discovered never-before-seen evolution and degradation patterns in two key battery materials.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-May-2014
The brain: Key to a better computer
Although brain-inspired computing is in its infancy, Sandia National Laboratories has included it in a long-term research project whose goal is future computer systems. Neuro-inspired computing seeks to develop algorithms that would run on computers that function more like a brain than a conventional computer.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

12-May-2014
Industry research: Experiment enters next stage at new Idaho hot cell
To the average eye, the experimental specimens don't look like much: silver-colored squares about the size of a domino. But the samples represent several big milestones for Idaho National Laboratory, the Department of Energy and the US nuclear energy industry. The irradiated 'compact tension' specimens are the first to undergo analysis in a specialized test rig at INL. Plus, they're part of a first-of-its-kind collaboration through the DOE's Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility.

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

8-May-2014
Engineering better machines and buildings by understanding mechanics of materials
Sandia National Laboratories is working to fill gaps in the fundamental understanding of materials science through an ambitious long-term, multidisciplinary project called Predicting Performance Margins, or PPM. From the atomic level to full-scale components, the research links variability in materials' atomic configurations and microstructures with how actual parts perform.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

29-Apr-2014
Label-free, sequence-specific, inexpensive fluorescent DNA sensors
Using principles of energy transfer more commonly applied to designing solar cells, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new highly sensitive way to detect specific sequences of DNA, the genetic material unique to every living thing. As described in a paper published in the journal Chemistry of Materials, the method is considerably less costly than other DNA assays and has widespread potential for applications in forensics, medical diagnostics, and the detection of bioterror agents.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

25-Apr-2014
'Sweet spot' for salty water
Computational modeling has given materials researchers new insight into the properties of a membrane that purifies saltwater into potable water. The resulting technology could help speed up inefficient desalination processes in use today.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

16-Apr-2014
Scientists capture ultrafast snapshots of light-driven superconductivity
A new study, based on an experiment at SLAC's X-ray laser, pins down a major factor behind the appearance of superconductivity -- the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency -- in a promising copper-oxide material.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Apr-2014
Simulation solves mystery of how liquid-crystal thin films disintegrate
Approximately four decades ago, theoreticians believed that only one of two mechanisms could explain rupture of liquid-crystal thin films. They also believed that these two mechanisms could not coexist. But 10 years ago experiments showed that these two mechanisms in many cases do coexist, according to Trung Nguyen of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who ran unprecedented large-scale molecular dynamics simulations on Titan, America's fastest supercomputer, to model the beginnings of ruptures in thin films.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

7-Apr-2014
Generations of supercomputers pin down primordial plasma
Brookhaven Lab's Lattice Gauge Theory Group hunts for equations to describe the early universe and the forces binding matter together. Their search spans generations of supercomputers and parallels studies of the primordial plasma discovered and explored at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

3-Apr-2014
'Smart window' material may make better batteries
Windows that darken to filter out sunlight in response to electric current, function much like batteries. Now, X-ray studies at SLAC provide a crystal-clear view into how this color-changing material behaves in a working battery -- information that could benefit next-generation rechargeable batteries.

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Mar-2014
Deep insights from thin layers
Imaging -- and understanding -- proteins may become a bit easier thanks to a team of researchers led by scientists at DOE's Pacific Northwest and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

3-Mar-2014
Particle beam cancer therapy: The promise and challenges
Advances in accelerators built for fundamental physics research have inspired improved cancer treatment facilities. But will one of the most promising -- a carbon ion treatment facility -- be built in the US? Participants at a symposium organized by Brookhaven Lab for the 2014 AAAS meeting explored the science and surrounding issues.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

26-Feb-2014
New perspective on a corrosive problem
Researchers at Argonne Lab took a peek at the problem of corrosion from the perspective of the water, and found a critical transition that drives the creation of corrosive conditions.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-Feb-2014
Sandia's Greg White chosen as a New Face of Engineering 2014
Sandia engineer Greg White has been chosen as one of the 2014 New Faces of Engineering, a recognition program that highlights the work of engineers ages 30 and younger.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

30-Jan-2014
Early Edison users deliver results
Before any supercomputer is accepted at NERSC, scientists are invited to put the system through its paces during an "early science" phase. While the main aim of this period is to test the new system, many scientists are able to use the time to significantly advance their work.

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Jan-2014
NERSC celebrates 40 years at the forefront
This year, the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is celebrating yet another milestone: its 40th anniversary.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
KKincade@lbl.gov
510-495-2124
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

29-Jan-2014
Letting in the light
Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, transparent, anti-soiling coating for solar reflectors to optimize energy efficiency while lowering operating and maintenance costs and avoiding negative environmental impacts.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Jan-2014
Deployments of network monitoring software perfSONAR hit 1,000
Finding the network bottlenecks that can slow the flow of science data sets and impede research can be extremely complex, especially as such data transfers cross a multitude of linked networks. But perfSONAR, a network monitoring software package developed jointly by DOE's Energy Sciences Network, national labs, universities and Internet 2, is making that task much easier. In January 2014, the number of perfSONAR instances installed in the US and 13 other countries reached 1,000.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

24-Jan-2014
Defense from a distance
Researchers are helping the military play defense from a distance.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Ames Laboratory

16-Jan-2014
Sandia conducts first impact test in years of B61 nonnuclear components
Sandia National Laboratories tests a ground-penetrating bomb, minus its nuclear components, in a rocket-driven impact test.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

16-Jan-2014
Top 10 Brookhaven Lab breakthroughs of 2013
2013 was a banner year for science at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratoryfrom our contributions to Nobel Prize-winning research to new insights into catalysts, superconductors, and other materials key to advancing energy-efficient technologies.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

7-Jan-2014
The play-by-play of energy conversion: Catching catalysts in action
Before catalysis unfolds in a laboratory, scientists painstakingly assemble the materials and spark a reaction. But many experimental techniques only capture the static details before and after the reaction. Now, researchers at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated an unprecedented ability to peer into the dynamic, real-time reactions blazing along at scales spanning just billionths of a meter, producing a sort of play-by-play view of the chemistry in action.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 530 stories.
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