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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 135 stories.
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17-Apr-2015
A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity
An international team led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory discovered a potential Rosetta Stone of high-temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

15-Apr-2015
Electrolyte genome could be battery game-changer
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Kristin Persson says she can take some of the guesswork out of the electrolyte discovery process with her Electrolyte Genome.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-Apr-2015
Long-sought magnetic mechanism observed in exotic hybrid materials
Scientists have measured the subatomic intricacies of an exotic phenomenon first predicted more than 60 years ago. This so-called van Vleck magnetism is the key to harnessing the quantum quirks of topological insulators -- hybrid materials that are both conducting and insulating -- and could lead to unprecedented electronics.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Apr-2015
'Explosive' atom movement is new window into growing metal nanostructures
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory expected to see slow, random movement when they dropped lead atoms on a lead-on-silicon surface. 'But what we saw? BOOM! Fast, explosive and organized!' said Michael Tringides, Ames Laboratory physicist. The unusual atom movement may represent a new way to grow perfect, tiny metal nanostructures for nanostransistors, nanoswitches, and nanomagnets.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

2-Apr-2015
Connecting vehicles
Computational framework for optimizing traffic flow could be the beginning of a road revolution.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Mar-2015
Collaborative vision, saving sight
A meeting to explore research collaborations between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee set the foundation for a company that provides accessible and remote health screenings for patients concerned about diabetic related eye diseases.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

25-Mar-2015
Protein shake-up
For living organisms proteins are an essential part of their body system and are needed to thrive. In recent years, a certain class of proteins has challenged researchers' conventional notion that proteins have a static and well-defined structure.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20-Mar-2015
Organic photovoltaics experiments showcase HPC 'superfacility' concept
A collaborative effort linking the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with supercomputing resources at NERSC and the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility is yielding exciting results in organic photovoltaics research that could transform the way researchers use these facilities and improve scientific productivity in the process.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Mar-2015
Scientists watch quantum dots 'breathe' in response to stress
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory watched nanoscale semiconductor crystals expand and shrink in response to powerful pulses of laser light. This ultrafast 'breathing' provides new insight about how such tiny structures change shape as they start to melt -- information that can help guide researchers in tailoring their use for a range of applications.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Mar-2015
Nanostructure complex materials modeling
Brookhaven physicist Simon Billinge illustrates how advances in computing and applied mathematics can improve the predictive value of models used to design new materials.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Mar-2015
Part II, Tackling grand challenges in geochemistry: Q&A with Andrew Stack
In this Q&A Andrew Stack, a geochemist at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, advances understanding of the dynamics of minerals underground. Stack and his team make discoveries that will help to improve our understanding of a wide range of energy-related issues, such as geologic storage of carbon dioxide, oil and gas discovery and development, and remediation of toxic contaminants. His current research spans three disciplines -- geology, chemistry and computing.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Mar-2015
Scientists gather at SLAC to prepare for Large Synoptic Survey Telescope
When the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope begins in 2022 to image the entire southern sky from a mountaintop in Chile, it will produce the widest, deepest and fastest views of the night sky ever observed -- and a flood of 6 million gigabytes of data per year that are expected to provide new insights into dark matter, dark energy and other cosmic mysteries.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Mar-2015
The making of a geochemist: Q&A with Andrew Stack
In this Q&A Andrew Stack of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory calls on expertise in geology, chemistry and computing to advance understanding of the dynamics of minerals underground. He investigates chemical processes that take place on mineral surfaces at scales ranging from individual atoms to entire rocks. These processes can trap contaminants, such as nuclear waste, carbon dioxide and toxic by-products from hydraulic fracturing.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Feb-2015
Innovative, lower cost sensors and controls yield better energy efficiency
Buildings are responsible for about 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States. Studies indicate that advanced sensors and controls have the potential to reduce the energy consumption of buildings by 20-30 percent.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-241-2074
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

26-Feb-2015
A new X-ray microscope for nanoscale imaging
A new microscope at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at NSLS-II will ultimately deliver nanoscale resolution imaging for everything from proteins to fuel cell catalysts.

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

23-Feb-2015
Zeolites: The inside story
Zeolites have been used for decades as catalysts and in other industrial applications, but the molecular transformations occurring within the porous material is not well understood. Scientists from universities, national laboratories and industries are using EMSL's staff expertise and advanced instrumentation to gain an atomic-level understanding of these materials to improve energy production and address environmental issues.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

20-Feb-2015
New programs enhance SIMES role in studying exotic new materials
Two new three-year research projects are supporting the role of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) as a leading center for studying exotic new materials that could enable future innovative electronic and photonic applications. SIMES is a joint institute of Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Feb-2015
Semiconductor works better when hitched to graphene
Graphene -- a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon with highly desirable electrical properties, flexibility and strength -- shows great promise for future electronics, advanced solar cells, protective coatings and other uses, and combining it with other materials could extend its range even further.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Feb-2015
Three young scientists will conduct research at Jefferson Lab
Outstanding academic accomplishments have earned three young scientists funds to conduct part of their thesis research at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Va.

Contact: Deb Magaldi
magaldi@jlab.org
Doe-Anderson

6-Feb-2015
Energy Secretary Moniz dedicates the world's brightest Synchrotron Light Source
US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the world's most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The NSLS-II is a $912-million DOE Office of Science User Facility that produces extremely bright beams of x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light used to examine a wide range of materials, including superconductors and catalysts, geological samples, and biological proteins to accelerate advances in energy, environmental science, and medicine.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Feb-2015
Five ways to put tiny targets in front of an X-ray laser
X-ray devices have long been used to see the inner structure of things, from bone breaks in the human body to the contents of luggage at airport security checkpoints. But to see life's chemistry and exotic materials at the scale of individual atoms, you need a far more powerful X-ray device. Enter the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Jan-2015
SLAC welcomes professor and Chemical Sciences Division director Tony Heinz
Tony Heinz, a scientist known for exploring the properties of nanoscale materials and developing important new tools for that exploration, has joined the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as a professor of photon science and Stanford University as a professor of applied physics. He will also lead the SLAC Chemical Sciences Division.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Jan-2015
Water, water, everywhere -- Controlling the properties of nanomaterials
Properties of water molecules on the surface of metal oxides can be used to better control these minerals and use them to make products such as more efficient semiconductors for organic light emitting diodes and solar cells, safer vehicle glass in fog and frost, and more environmentally friendly chemical sensors for industrial applications.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jan-2015
2014's top-10 scientific achievements at Brookhaven Lab
From new insights into the building blocks of matter to advances in understanding batteries, superconductors, and a protein that could help fight cancer, 2014 was a year of stunning successes for the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

19-Dec-2014
First direct evidence that a phase of matter competes with high-temperature superconductivity
Scientists have found the first direct evidence that a mysterious phase of matter known as the 'pseudogap' competes with high-temperature superconductivity, robbing it of electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 135 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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