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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 143 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


13-May-2015
Digitizing neurons
Supercomputing resources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will support a new initiative designed to advance how scientists digitally reconstruct and analyze individual neurons in the human brain.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-May-2015
ORNL group leads calorimeter upgrade for Large Hadron Collider experiment
Run-2 for the Large Hadron Collider -- the world's largest and most powerful particle collider -- began April 5 at CERN. In preparation, Thomas M. Cormier, who leads the LHC Heavy Ion group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, led an upgrade of the electromagnetic calorimeter used for LHC's experiment called ALICE (for A Large Ion Collider Experiment). This detector measures the energies of high-energy electrons and gamma rays emitted from the quark-gluon plasma.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-May-2015
'Chombo-crunch' sinks its teeth into fluid dynamics
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are breaking new ground in the modeling of complex flows in energy and oil and gas applications, thanks to a computational fluid dynamics and transport code dubbed 'Chombo-Crunch.'

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10-May-2015
Metamaterials shine bright as new terahertz source
Terahertz waves are used in information, communication, processing, and data storage technologies, yet few terahertz sources are available due to the limitations of natural materials. Scientists discovered an efficient terahertz emission from two-dimensional arrays of gold split-ring resonator metamaterials, which allow design and use of light-matter interactions at a fundamental level. This discovery opens new ways to use such materials.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

8-May-2015
SLAC researcher receives DOE 'Early Career' grant to support X-ray optics and imaging
Anne Sakdinawat, an associate staff scientist at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has been recognized with a prestigious DOE Early Career Research Program grant to advance her work in creating and using next-generation focusing and imaging devices for X-ray experiments at SLAC and other research sites.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-May-2015
Highly conductive germanium nanowires made by a simple, 1-step process
For the first time, germanium nanowires that can be used as high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries were deposited on an indium tin oxide substrate using electrodeposition, a simple, one-step process.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.go
DOE/US Department of Energy

8-May-2015
Intertwining of superconductivity and magnetism
Experiments reveal nearly static, spatially modulated magnetism in a copper-oxide superconductor. Because static magnetism and superconductivity prefer not to coexist in the same material, the superconducting wave function is also likely modulated in space and phase-shifted to minimize overlap, consistent with recent theory. This study will assist in developing a predictive theory for high-temperature superconductivity that can assist in the design and discovery of improved superconductors.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

4-May-2015
Giant electromagnet arrives at Brookhaven Lab to map melted matter
A 20-ton superconducting magnet traveled from California's SLAC Lab to New York's Brookhaven Lab as part of a proposed upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's PHENIX detector.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Apr-2015
New path to loss-free electricity
Electric current flows without any resistance in a superconducting state thanks to a surprising redistribution of bonding electrons and the associated electronic and atomic behavior after substitution of some cobalt atoms for iron in barium iron arsenide.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

29-Apr-2015
SIMES researchers elected to National Academy of Sciences
Materials scientists and professors at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Zhi-Xun Shen, Shoucheng Zhang and Aharon Kapitulnik were elected to the National Academy of Sciences. All three researchers are principal investigators at the joint SLAC and Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Apr-2015
Connecting 3 atomic layers puts semiconducting science on its edge
Scientists created a new semiconducting material -- only three atomic layers thick -- that exhibits electronic properties beyond traditional semiconductors. Two nano-engineered configurations of the material have shown an enhanced response to light.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

28-Apr-2015
Direct visualization of magnetoelectric domains
A novel microscopy technique called magnetoelectric force microscopy was developed to detect the local cross-coupling between magnetic and electric dipoles. Combined experimental observation and theoretical modeling provide understanding on how a bulk linear magnetoelectric effect can be realized in a new family of materials.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

27-Apr-2015
Unexpected success
While experimenting with a heat treatment process he modified by eliminating a couple of steps, Klett made a discovery that caused quite a stir and prompted hundreds of inquiries from scientists, academia and industry.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Apr-2015
Sticky fingers
Researcher applies materials science techniques to the field of forensics, and some of her research has helped crime scene investigators rebuild fingerprints after they have faded over time.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Apr-2015
Insulator-to-metal transition of vanadium dioxide
When heated to just above room temperature, the electrical conductivity of vanadium dioxide abruptly increases by a factor of 10,000. Experiments and high-performance computation reveal how the unusually large lattice vibrations stabilize this highly conductive metallic phase.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

24-Apr-2015
Spontaneous formation of biomimetic, nanoporous membrane channels
For the first time, spontaneous insertion of carbon nanotubes into natural as well as synthetic cell membranes to form pores that mimic biological channels has been demonstrated.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

23-Apr-2015
Optimizing atomic neighborhoods for speedier chemical reactions
Scientists have discovered that for palladium-nickel catalysts, certain surface characteristics, measured at the atomic level, sped the creation of carbon dioxide from carbon monoxide. This type of atomic detail has not been available by traditional studies and can aid the cycle of catalyst design by optimizing for structural parameters at the nearest neighbor level of an atomic environment.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

22-Apr-2015
Multimetal nanoframes improve catalyst performance
Researchers synthesized a highly active and durable class of electrocatalysts by exploiting the structural evolution of solid Pt-Ni bimetallic nanocrystals into porous cage-like structures or nanoframes. This approach to synthesizing the material is a significant advance towards realizing electrocatalysts with superior catalytic properties and lower cost.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

17-Apr-2015
A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity
An international team led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory discovered a potential Rosetta Stone of high-temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Kristin Manke
kristin.manke@science.doe.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

15-Apr-2015
Electrolyte genome could be battery game-changer
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Kristin Persson says she can take some of the guesswork out of the electrolyte discovery process with her Electrolyte Genome.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-Apr-2015
Long-sought magnetic mechanism observed in exotic hybrid materials
Scientists have measured the subatomic intricacies of an exotic phenomenon first predicted more than 60 years ago. This so-called van Vleck magnetism is the key to harnessing the quantum quirks of topological insulators -- hybrid materials that are both conducting and insulating -- and could lead to unprecedented electronics.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Apr-2015
'Explosive' atom movement is new window into growing metal nanostructures
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory expected to see slow, random movement when they dropped lead atoms on a lead-on-silicon surface. 'But what we saw? BOOM! Fast, explosive and organized!' said Michael Tringides, Ames Laboratory physicist. The unusual atom movement may represent a new way to grow perfect, tiny metal nanostructures for nanostransistors, nanoswitches, and nanomagnets.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

2-Apr-2015
Connecting vehicles
Computational framework for optimizing traffic flow could be the beginning of a road revolution.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Mar-2015
Collaborative vision, saving sight
A meeting to explore research collaborations between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee set the foundation for a company that provides accessible and remote health screenings for patients concerned about diabetic related eye diseases.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

25-Mar-2015
Protein shake-up
For living organisms proteins are an essential part of their body system and are needed to thrive. In recent years, a certain class of proteins has challenged researchers' conventional notion that proteins have a static and well-defined structure.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 143 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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