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Features Archive


Showing stories 326-335 out of 335 stories.
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17-Nov-2006
Technology improves food processing quality
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed an ultrasonic technology that could tell food manufacturers if foreign objects have fallen into their product long before it reaches the consumer.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Nov-2006
ScalaBLAST solves problems in record time
Scientists are dedicated to making discoveries that influence our world, but making these discoveries takes time. It took Albert Einstein 16 years to express his general theory of relativity. Benjamin Franklin was first introduced to electricity experiments on a trip to Boston in 1746, but his famous lightning rod experiment didn't occur until six years later -- and he knocked himself unconscious more than once in the process.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Nov-2006
Uniform nano-clusters signal improved catalysts
A new model system of nanostructures has been synthesized and could lead to control of chemical transformations critical for enhancing the nation's energy future.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

17-Nov-2006
Structural safety gets boost from new technology
An acoustic inspection technology developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory may help users in the oil, gas and other industries decide if a metal structure can withstand normal operation. Using a newly developed ultrasonic measurement technology, PNNL researcher Paul Panetta and his team can rapidly locate and characterize suspected damage associated with strained metal, which current technologies cannot do.

Contact: Lisa Teke
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

16-Nov-2006
Sometimes smaller is better
A research team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oregon Health and Science University, University of Minnesota and the University of Idaho is studying the ability of nanoscale iron particles to reduce carbon tetrachloride, a common groundwater contaminant.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Oct-2006
ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor prepares to make 'cold' neutrons
The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has passed a major milestone in its quest to become one of the world's leading sources of 'cold' neutrons for advanced scientific research. Once fully operational, the reactor will combine with the laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source to make Oak Ridge the world's center for neutron sciences.

Contact: Mike Bradley
bradleymk@ornl.gov
865-576-9553
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Sep-2006
DOE's Solar Decathlon draws student teams worldwide
They come from around the world to participate in the Solar Decathlon, a contest focused on creating a livable, solar-powered house on a shoe-string budget.

Contact: Janice Rooney
janice_rooney@nrel.gov
303-275-3859
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

8-Aug-2006
Jefferson Lab's newest cluster computer takes shape
Unlike a regular computer -- whose "brain" consists of one or perhaps two processors -- a cluster computer's brain can contain hundreds or even thousands of individual processors, called nodes -- all wired together. To solve a problem, the cluster splits the problem into parts, and each node computes its designated part and shares the result with other nodes to produce the final solution.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
On the leading edge
The Accelerator Division's Institute for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Science & Technology is a world leader in SRF accelerator technology research and design. Now the newest idea out of the Institute may revolutionize the way accelerating cavities are produced -- making the manufacturing process faster and cheaper, while producing cavities that could potentially outperform any other niobium cavities ever tested.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Detector Group builds imaging device for German Research Center
Jefferson Lab Detector Group members traveled to Heidelberg, Germany, to assemble and bring on-line a small-animal imaging device the group developed and built for the German Cancer Research Center. Work on the project began in June 2004. The device is similar other small animal imaging gamma cameras developed by the Detector Group; however, this imager design is based on a new concept developed by Vladimir Popov which resulted in highly improved detector performance.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing stories 326-335 out of 335 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14


 

 

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