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Features Archive

Showing stories 326-350 out of 521 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

14-Jun-2002
Energy Secretary Abraham announces Center for Nanosciences at Brookhaven Lab
Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced that the department plans to proceed with a center for nanoscale science research at its Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

3-Jun-2002
Angling for a better (nano) surface
A promising method for creating and studying chemically tailored nanocrystalline surface materials was recently developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results are reported in the April 11, 2002, issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-May-2002
Forensic science center maximizes the tiniest clue
Lawrence Livermore's Forensic Science Center combination of human and technological resources has made it among the best of its kind for collecting and analyzing virtually any kind of evidence, some of it no larger than a few billionths of a gram. Its resources, expertise, tools, and techniques are applied to all kinds of cases, from the September 11 World Trade Center attack to the spread of anthrax spores, from multiple homicides to nuclear materials smuggling.

Contact: Brian Andresen
andresen1@llnl.gov
925-422-0903
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-May-2002
Mapping the microbial world
Scientists are cataloguing and mapping the life inside Yellowstone’s hot pools. Hardy microorganisms ranging from emerald-green bacteria to fire-red rock slime have long fascinated microbiologists with their ability to live in the scalding hot water at Yellowstone National Park, the acidic ore deposits of abandoned mines or the salt pools of the Great Salt Lake.

Contact: Daphne Stoner
dstoner@inel.gov
208-526-8786
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

22-May-2002
LANSCE builds on 2001 successes as it readies for new run
As researchers at the world’s most powerful linear accelerator prepare for the upcoming run cycle, they look back on a successful 2001 run cycle that produced scores of experimental results for basic and defense science, built key new facilities and instruments and set records for operating efficiency.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Research with high magnetic fields
The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory develops for use in basic research the world's most powerful pulsed electromagnets. A super-powerful generator can deliver a pulse equal to more than one million times the magnetic field found naturally on Earth.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Pipe locating sensor could help prevent natural gas leaks
A new flat plate sensor being developed by DOE and the Gas Technology Institute could pinpoint underground natural gas pipes before they can be accidentally damaged by "third party" construction crews.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

10-May-2002
Near-frictionless carbon coating nears commercial applications
Four years and more than 3,000 phone calls and e-mail contacts later, Argonne's "near-frictionless carbon" coating stands on the brink of commercialization. A sample of the coating on a sapphire substrate survived 17.5 million passes of a steel ball. After 32 days, the testing machine failed, but the ball left only a barely visible track on the coating.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

6-May-2002
Molecular shuttling
The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory researchers observed molecular shuttling on a man-made membrane that mimics cellular behavior. Recurring movements may evolve into rudimentary tools of nanoconstruction. These observations were published as the cover story in the April 30, 2002, issue of the chemical and biophysics journal Langmuir.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

30-Apr-2002
Simulating supernovae on supercomputers
Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae will answer important questions about the creation and dissemination of elements that make life possible. They may also be important in the development of “enabling technologies” for other applications, such as combustion, climate, fusion, stockpile stewardship, and nuclear medicine.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling blood flow during CPR
Thanks to computer modeling, a scientific discovery was made that might lead to a way to save victims of cardiac arrest.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Probing cells by computer
A computational analysis of human and bacterial genomes by ORNL researchers provides insights into what our genes do. ORNL researchers will soon be predicting 100 protein structures a day and evaluating which compounds could make highly effective therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
A National resource at ORNL
Supercomputers at ORNL are enabling scientists in a number of fields to make discoveries that could not be made through either theoretical or experimental research.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL's powerful tools for scientific discovery
ORNL offers 5.5 teraflops of computing to advance scientific discovery. Some ORNL computational research is funded by DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
ORNL, IBM, and the Blue Gene Project
ORNL is working with IBM to develop the Blue Gene supercomputer for relating protein shapes to disease.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Evaluating supercomputer performance
In selecting the right machine on which to run a code or the next machine to buy, evaluators of supercomputers focus on many parameters ranging from speeds to terabytes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling magnetic materials
Materials research using supercomputers is paving the way for the next generation of information technology.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Networking: making faster connections among supercomputers
ORNL researchers are devising ways to move large data files faster over computer networks and to reduce delays in data delivery so supercomputers are not idle.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Visualization tools: interacting with data in many dimensions
Visualization tools used in the CAVE™ virtual reality theater at ORNL let scientists interact with predicted phenomena such as stellar explosions and climate changes.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Designing electronic devices using supercomputers
A proposed molecular memory cell that would allow laptop computer batteries to last 100 times longer than today’s batteries is being modeled computationally on an IBM supercomputer at ORNL. This machine is also being used to simulate electron transport in carbon nanotubes in contact with other components, for future nanoscale electronic devices.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

23-Apr-2002
A nickel's worth of foil helps make antimatter
Making antimatter that can't be seen and that otherwise might not exist, filtering it through a nickel's worth of aluminum foil and then capturing it in a "trap" without walls, has the attention of Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist Michael Holzscheiter.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
dupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

22-Apr-2002
World's most powerful linux-based supercomputer
The Department of Energy's Office of Science will acquire a $24.5 million HP Linux-based supercomputer that, when fully operational, will be the world's most powerful Linux-based supercomputer and one of the top supercomputers in the world.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
New ceramic membranes may help hydrogen replace gasoline as auto fuel
If hydrogen fuel cells are ever to replace gasoline engines in cars, they will need a cheap source of high-purity hydrogen -- and Argonne technology could provide one. Argonne's Energy Technology Division has developed a ceramic membrane that can extract hydrogen from methane, the chief component of natural gas.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
The question
This response to a Fermilab employee's email examines the reasons why particle physics research is done and how both Fermilab particle physicists and others perceive its value for our nation and the world.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 326-350 out of 521 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

 

 

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