U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 326-335 out of 335 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14


5-Oct-2006
ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor prepares to make 'cold' neutrons
The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has passed a major milestone in its quest to become one of the world's leading sources of 'cold' neutrons for advanced scientific research. Once fully operational, the reactor will combine with the laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source to make Oak Ridge the world's center for neutron sciences.

Contact: Mike Bradley
bradleymk@ornl.gov
865-576-9553
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Sep-2006
DOE's Solar Decathlon draws student teams worldwide
They come from around the world to participate in the Solar Decathlon, a contest focused on creating a livable, solar-powered house on a shoe-string budget.

Contact: Janice Rooney
janice_rooney@nrel.gov
303-275-3859
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

8-Aug-2006
Jefferson Lab's newest cluster computer takes shape
Unlike a regular computer -- whose "brain" consists of one or perhaps two processors -- a cluster computer's brain can contain hundreds or even thousands of individual processors, called nodes -- all wired together. To solve a problem, the cluster splits the problem into parts, and each node computes its designated part and shares the result with other nodes to produce the final solution.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
On the leading edge
The Accelerator Division's Institute for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Science & Technology is a world leader in SRF accelerator technology research and design. Now the newest idea out of the Institute may revolutionize the way accelerating cavities are produced -- making the manufacturing process faster and cheaper, while producing cavities that could potentially outperform any other niobium cavities ever tested.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Jul-2006
Detector Group builds imaging device for German Research Center
Jefferson Lab Detector Group members traveled to Heidelberg, Germany, to assemble and bring on-line a small-animal imaging device the group developed and built for the German Cancer Research Center. Work on the project began in June 2004. The device is similar other small animal imaging gamma cameras developed by the Detector Group; however, this imager design is based on a new concept developed by Vladimir Popov which resulted in highly improved detector performance.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

29-Jun-2006
Technology demonstration thwarts fictitious terrorist attack
The pace was intense as data flowed in from sources across the world -- a spike in radiation from a ground-based indicator in Pakistan, an unexplained outbreak of plague in India, and a disturbing convergence of travel plans among suspected terrorists. Information Analysis Center analysts agreed the evidence indicated a well planned terrorist attack was imminent in downtown Seattle. Local law enforcement was quickly dispatched, capturing the suspected terrorists as they attempted to smuggle a chemical and radiation dispersing bomb into the city.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Lightweight materials pave the road for energy-efficient vehicles
In efforts to shorten the long road to fuel efficiency, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to develop cost-effective, high-strength, lightweight materials that will reduce vehicle weight without compromising cost, performance or safety.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

29-Jun-2006
Catalysis: The science behind sustainable energy
About 60 percent of the things we wear or use are produced by processes that depend on catalysis. Catalysts are substances that modify chemical reaction rates and remain unchanged afterward. Catalyst technologies affect nearly all areas of the chemical and petroleum industries with an economic impact estimated at more than $10 trillion per year worldwide. Now more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are in demand for new energy production processes to ease the United States' dependence on imported resources.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Managing the Soviet legacy
An intact nuclear weapon is stolen and detonated. A terrorist group somehow steals, purchases, or produces fissile material and fabricates a crude bomb, called an improvised nuclear device, which the group threatens to detonate if its demands are not met.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Science for security
Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, national security has become a priority mission of the Department of Energy. This mission, which in addition to public safety focuses on the protection of America's economic and energy security assets, is supported by an increasingly robust program of technological innovation.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 326-335 out of 335 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14


 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map