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Features Archive

Showing stories 351-375 out of 512 stories.
<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

12-Mar-2002
New projects to help operators 'see' oil, gas formations more clearly
To develop better ways for producers to "see" promising oil-bearing formations, DOE has selected six new projects to develop advanced diagnostics and imaging technologies.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
Hand-held radiation detector could outsmart terrorists
Engineers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a 10-pound, battery-powered radiation detector called Cryo3 that is intended to outsmart anyone trying to smuggle radioactive material into the country.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

6-Mar-2002
New projects to explore 'breakthrough' ideas for capturing, storing carbon gases
As part of its efforts to develop "breakthrough" approaches for reducing the threat of global climate change, the Department has added three new projects to develop ways to capture carbon dioxide released from power plants and safely prevent it from entering the atmosphere.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
From kilobytes to petabytes in 50 years
"The day when the scientist, no matter how devoted, can make significant progress alone and without material help has passed." - E.O. Lawrence, founder of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on accepting the 1939 Nobel Prize for Physics.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
L-Gel decontaminates better than bleach
Scientists have developed a material that is safe for people and the environment but deadly to the agents of biological and chemical warfare.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Faster inspection of laser coatings
Lasers have been a Lawrence Livermore specialty almost since the first laser flashed in 1960. Dealing with the challenges that arise as these lasers get bigger and more powerful is, of necessity, a specialty too.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Giving an EDGE to sustainable design
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed tools for sustainable design, a term that describes a systematic approach to ensuring that facilities, products and processes are addressing the "triple bottom line" - the environment, economics and social equity.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Modernizing the military
From software to identification systems, diagnostics to emergency management, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed technologies that could support the military as it moves into the 21st century.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sophisticated imagery analysis
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory launched its Imaging Science and Technology Initiative (ISAT) in 2001 to cover a broad range of potential applications, including counterterrorism.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Border training helps reduce dangerous smuggling
A joint program between the U.S. Customs Service and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides training to foreign border guards, customs patrol and frontier police on how to spot red flags that should trigger a search, as well as how to use specialized technology to detect and identify items used to make nuclear, chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Airport security scanner for safer skies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have spent more than 12 years developing a Personal Security Scanner that allows security guards to "see" concealed weapons, including plastic explosives and other nonmetallic threats.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Information analysisóby Starlight
Much like individual stars coalesce to form constellations, information visualization software developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helps decision-makers see the importance of individual pieces of data by showing how they relate to one another.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic componentsólipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
Providing technical aid to small producers in America's oil fields
Fracturing, New Computer Imaging Focus of Recent DOE Selections More than half of America's oil production from the lower 48 States is supplied by small independent producers. As these companies become increasingly important to America's energy security, the Energy Department continues to provide grants for the smallest of these producers to test better technologies that can keep their wells pumping.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
State-of-the-art magnetoelectronics lab puts Ames Lab on thin-film fast track
Tucked away in a small laboratory space on the second floor of Metals Development is new, state-of-the-art research equipment that should help boost Ames Lab researchers David Jiles and John Snyder to the forefront of thin-film research and the newly emerging field of magnetoelectronics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Passively safe reactors rely on nature to keep them cool
The basic purpose of reactor safety is to protect the public and plant workers from harmful radiation exposure. The goal of modern safety design is to provide this protection by relying on the laws of nature, rather than on engineered systems that require power to operate, equipment to function properly and operators to take correct actions in stressful emergency situations. To achieve this, you have to remove decay heat, contain radioactive materials, and maintain a proper balance between heat generation and heat removal.

Contact: Dave Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
630-252-5584
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Disorderly superconductors caught in the act
The "granular" nature of superconductivity in underdoped high-temperature superconductors proposed by theorists has had some believers but many skeptics. New observations, reported in the 24 January issue of Nature, may shift how researchers think about these materials.

Contact: Paul Preuss
ul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
A clear view
It is as translucent as glass. It comes by train, two railcars every week. Fermilab will receive 250,000 gallons of it, enough to fill a 25-meter swimming pool. What is it? Some of the clearest mineral oil available in the country, intended for the MiniBooNE experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Jan-2002
New magnetic refrigerator
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator. The refrigerator was developed by Milwaukee-based Astronautics Corporation of America as part of a cooperative research and development agreement with Ames Laboratory.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing stories 351-375 out of 512 stories.
<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

 

 

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