U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 376-400 out of 526 stories.
<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Information analysisóby Starlight
Much like individual stars coalesce to form constellations, information visualization software developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory helps decision-makers see the importance of individual pieces of data by showing how they relate to one another.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Opening new markets for agricultural byproducts
Researchers at Pacific Northwest and ADM have developed processes that will reclaim greater value from the hulls of corn kernals by separating the hull's fiber into its basic componentsólipids, carbohydrates, proteins. These products will then be used to produce fuel ethanol and the building blocks for industrial chemicals, as well as higher value food, feed and consumer products.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Biological science takes on a new dimension
Pacific Northwest's Biomolecular Systems Initiative takes a systems approach to biology to build solutions to critical environmental and health problems. Defining how to bring together diverse types of information is at the heart of the initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Sensible sensors
Joseph Shinar, Ames Laboratory senior physicist, in collaboration with chemist Raoul Kopelman from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has developed a novel, fluorescence-based chemical sensor that is smaller, less expensive and more versatile than existing technology of its kind.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

18-Feb-2002
Providing technical aid to small producers in America's oil fields
Fracturing, New Computer Imaging Focus of Recent DOE Selections More than half of America's oil production from the lower 48 States is supplied by small independent producers. As these companies become increasingly important to America's energy security, the Energy Department continues to provide grants for the smallest of these producers to test better technologies that can keep their wells pumping.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
State-of-the-art magnetoelectronics lab puts Ames Lab on thin-film fast track
Tucked away in a small laboratory space on the second floor of Metals Development is new, state-of-the-art research equipment that should help boost Ames Lab researchers David Jiles and John Snyder to the forefront of thin-film research and the newly emerging field of magnetoelectronics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Passively safe reactors rely on nature to keep them cool
The basic purpose of reactor safety is to protect the public and plant workers from harmful radiation exposure. The goal of modern safety design is to provide this protection by relying on the laws of nature, rather than on engineered systems that require power to operate, equipment to function properly and operators to take correct actions in stressful emergency situations. To achieve this, you have to remove decay heat, contain radioactive materials, and maintain a proper balance between heat generation and heat removal.

Contact: Dave Baurac
baurac@anl.gov
630-252-5584
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

28-Jan-2002
Disorderly superconductors caught in the act
The "granular" nature of superconductivity in underdoped high-temperature superconductors proposed by theorists has had some believers but many skeptics. New observations, reported in the 24 January issue of Nature, may shift how researchers think about these materials.

Contact: Paul Preuss
ul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
Fermilab 2002: The outlook
If we learned anything from the year 2001, it is the impossibility of predicting what the next twelve months will bring. Nevertheless, at least one thing seems certain: 2002 at Fermilab will see unique scientific opportunities and extraordinary challenges for physics at the energy frontier.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jan-2002
A clear view
It is as translucent as glass. It comes by train, two railcars every week. Fermilab will receive 250,000 gallons of it, enough to fill a 25-meter swimming pool. What is it? Some of the clearest mineral oil available in the country, intended for the MiniBooNE experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Jan-2002
New magnetic refrigerator
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator. The refrigerator was developed by Milwaukee-based Astronautics Corporation of America as part of a cooperative research and development agreement with Ames Laboratory.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Rapid field detection of biological agents
Livermore scientists have developed two portable biodetection systems to help in the fight against bioterrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Simulating turbulence in magnetic fusion plasmas
Powerful three-dimensional simulations are helping researchers to speed the development of magnetic fusion energy.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Present at the Creation
When they synthesized elements 114 and 116, Russian and Livermore scientists confirmed decades-old predictions of the existence of superheavy elements with comparatively long lifetimes.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Creating a robot colony
Scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are creating an army of small robots--a fleet of inexpensive mini-robots designed to work harmoniously to perform tasks too hazardous or just downright boring for humans. Simple biological societies, such as ant colonies and beehives, serve as handy models for creating large groups of small, disposable robots.

Contact: Donald Dudenhoeffer
dudedd@inel.gov
208-526-0700
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
EDM cuts cleaner, smoother
The Charmilles Technologies Robofil 290 Wire Electrical Discharge Machine, or EDM for short, uses an electrical spark delivered by a fine wire to cut through any material that conducts electricity.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
BAM continues amazing development
A material that rivals industrial diamond in hardness continues to amaze the researchers who developed it and attract interest from a variety of industrial sectors. The material represents a breakthrough technology that could have a substantial impact on the machining industry, which spends $300 billion each year in labor and overhead in the United States alone.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Building on success
When researchers at Ames Laboratory developed a compact laboratory furnace, it marked a huge leap forward in the ability to understand what happens to a material's crystal structure as the material is heated and cooled. That success has led to the building of two additional furnaces for other DOE laboratories and a refined design intended to make the furnace easier to operate.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
'Fast-talking' clusters
Researchers at Ames Laboratory's Scalable Computing Lab have extended their investigation into communication technology for cluster computers thanks to a National Science Foundation Major Research Instrument grant awarded to Iowa State University's Center for Physical and Computational Mathematics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Biothreat detection takes concentration
Detecting potential biological threats is part of the Department of Energy's plan for homeland defense, and a new automated device developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a key piece in biothreat detection technology.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
From the stone age to the lego block age of computing
The Center for Component Technology for Terascale Simulation Software (CCTTSS), another of ORNL's projects to receive funding from DOE's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program, may well revolutionize the way terascale software simulations are developed.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling and homeland security
ORNL researchers have developed computer-based products that could provide information to help Americans better protect themselves from natural, accidental, or deliberate threats.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 376-400 out of 526 stories.
<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map