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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 401-425 out of 521 stories.
<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Developing computer tools for scientists
ORNL researchers and their university and national lab colleagues are developing tools to enable scientists to run simulation codes more efficiently on massively parallel supercomputers and clusters of personal computers.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
The science grid
Science grids are being established to connect scientists, instruments, computing, and data.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Dec-2001
Advanced computing and high energy physics for the 21st century
Through the SciDAC awards, Fermilab will receive approximately $1.28 million a year for the next three years as a participant in three nationwide collaborations: the Particle Physics DataGrid; Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology; and the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Dec-2001
Nanoskin
These self-assembling nanostructures—as durable as seashells—may lower costs by reducing the need for expensive manufactured devices like stress detectors, chemical analyzers, and thermometers.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

3-Dec-2001
Homeland security
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently took information on three projects to DOE headquarters in Washington to brief Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham and Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge. They were part of an exhibition of more than two dozen counter-terrorism technologies sponsored by the DOE.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

26-Nov-2001
New way to make 'neuts'
Neutrons can penetrate deeply to find defects in large machine parts or tiny microdevices, elucidate the structure of biological systems and polymers, sense fluids in geological formations, and probe solids and liquids on the atomic scale.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Nov-2001
IBM and DOE pool supercomputing talents to examine disease
At the heart of the agreement is IBM's Blue Gene research project, which combines advanced protein science with IBM's next-generation cellular architecture supercomputer design.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2001
NSF grant triggers wide computing possiblities form BTeV
Everybody talks about crashing computers, but nobody does anything about them. But with a $4.98 million National Science Foundation grant in the area of Information Technology Research, Fermilab's B-physics at the Tevatron experiment (BTeV) just might help solve the puzzle of "Why don't things always work as well as we'd like?"

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Nov-2001
A new way to visualize cells and nuclei
To learn how tissues develop and maintain their organization—and especially to learn what goes wrong when cancer strikes—it's essential to study individual cells and their nuclei within tissues. The problem is that in real tissues, and in many cell cultures grown in the laboratory, cells are often tightly clustered; their boundaries and the borders of their nuclei are hard to distinguish.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Magnetic refrigerator successfully tested
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Oct-2001
Idaho Accelerator Center leads the way in research and education
The Idaho Accelerator Center stands as a monument to the future--using science to develop devices to further national security, healthcare, and business.

Contact: James Jones
jlj@inel.gov
208-526-1730
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
World's largest unclassified supercomputer
Scientists at universities and national laboratories across the country are now tapping into the power of the world's largest supercomputer dedicated to unclassified research and have reported important breakthroughs in climate research, materials science and astrophysics.

Contact: Jon Bashor
JBashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
SciDAC DOE initiative targets heart of fusion machine
Fusion energy, evident in the sun and stars, is the ultimate source of power because it provides an environmentally acceptable alternative to energy generated by fossil fuels. To achieve fusion energy requires that the fuel material be heated to hundreds of millions of degrees, much hotter than the sun.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
Cancer-detecting microchip
clever technique for detecting proteins by inducing them to stick to and bend a microscopic cantilever—essentially a diving board the size of a hair—is sensitive enough to serve as a diagnostic assay for the protein markers characteristic of prostate cancer, a team of scientists report in the September issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rls@pa.urel.berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Run II well under control
On March 1, Collider Run II began at Fermilab. It is a six-year enterprise to produce a record number of proton-antiproton collisions using the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Tevatron.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
A case of identity: Kerberos
Question for our time: Who are you, and can you prove it? Increasingly, the computing solution for these questions in these times is Kerberos, a system of "strong authentication" for computer users invented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and already operating at many universities and several Department of Energy national laboratories.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Yeung's new technology is Editors' Choice
The award-winning technology, Absorption Detection System in Multiple Capillaries, developed by Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences and an ISU Distinguished Professor, has been named the Most Promising New Technology by the editors of R&D Magazine.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
A giant among us
Klaus Ruedenberg, an Ames Laboratory senior associate and an Iowa State University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, has been chosen to receive the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing stories 401-425 out of 521 stories.
<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

 

 

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