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Features Archive


Showing stories 401-425 out of 536 stories.
<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>


1-Jan-2002
Simulating turbulence in magnetic fusion plasmas
Powerful three-dimensional simulations are helping researchers to speed the development of magnetic fusion energy.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Present at the Creation
When they synthesized elements 114 and 116, Russian and Livermore scientists confirmed decades-old predictions of the existence of superheavy elements with comparatively long lifetimes.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Creating a robot colony
Scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are creating an army of small robots--a fleet of inexpensive mini-robots designed to work harmoniously to perform tasks too hazardous or just downright boring for humans. Simple biological societies, such as ant colonies and beehives, serve as handy models for creating large groups of small, disposable robots.

Contact: Donald Dudenhoeffer
dudedd@inel.gov
208-526-0700
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
EDM cuts cleaner, smoother
The Charmilles Technologies Robofil 290 Wire Electrical Discharge Machine, or EDM for short, uses an electrical spark delivered by a fine wire to cut through any material that conducts electricity.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
BAM continues amazing development
A material that rivals industrial diamond in hardness continues to amaze the researchers who developed it and attract interest from a variety of industrial sectors. The material represents a breakthrough technology that could have a substantial impact on the machining industry, which spends $300 billion each year in labor and overhead in the United States alone.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Building on success
When researchers at Ames Laboratory developed a compact laboratory furnace, it marked a huge leap forward in the ability to understand what happens to a material's crystal structure as the material is heated and cooled. That success has led to the building of two additional furnaces for other DOE laboratories and a refined design intended to make the furnace easier to operate.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
'Fast-talking' clusters
Researchers at Ames Laboratory's Scalable Computing Lab have extended their investigation into communication technology for cluster computers thanks to a National Science Foundation Major Research Instrument grant awarded to Iowa State University's Center for Physical and Computational Mathematics.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Biothreat detection takes concentration
Detecting potential biological threats is part of the Department of Energy's plan for homeland defense, and a new automated device developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a key piece in biothreat detection technology.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
From the stone age to the lego block age of computing
The Center for Component Technology for Terascale Simulation Software (CCTTSS), another of ORNL's projects to receive funding from DOE's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program, may well revolutionize the way terascale software simulations are developed.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling and homeland security
ORNL researchers have developed computer-based products that could provide information to help Americans better protect themselves from natural, accidental, or deliberate threats.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Dirty coal, clean power
Iver Anderson thinks the solution to the rolling power blackouts in California and parts of the East Coast may lie under the rolling black soil of Iowa’s farm country. "Iowa is sitting on top of huge deposits of coal," says Anderson, an Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist. "The problem is that it’s high-sulfur, dirty coal." Anderson and colleagues Bob Terspstra and Brian Gleeson are closing in on a new material to filter the nasty ashes and dust that result from burning "dirty" coal.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Old material makes a new debut
Magnesium diboride is a relatively inexpensive metal compound that can be purchased in powder form from most standard chemical supply companies. Until this year, there was nothing remarkable about it — at least nothing that was known. But the material had never been investigated for superconductivity — whether it had the ability to conduct electricity perfectly, without resistance, when cooled to temperatures near absolute zero (minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit).

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Car crash simulations may improve vehicle efficiency
ORNL researchers are building computer models of vehicles made of aluminum, regular steel, high-strength steel, and carbon-fiber composites. This research could lead to safer, energy-efficient cars.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Chemical experiments and predictions by computer
Supercomputers can be used to simulate chemical reactions, saving time and money and increasing safety.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Developing computer tools for scientists
ORNL researchers and their university and national lab colleagues are developing tools to enable scientists to run simulation codes more efficiently on massively parallel supercomputers and clusters of personal computers.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
The science grid
Science grids are being established to connect scientists, instruments, computing, and data.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Dec-2001
Advanced computing and high energy physics for the 21st century
Through the SciDAC awards, Fermilab will receive approximately $1.28 million a year for the next three years as a participant in three nationwide collaborations: the Particle Physics DataGrid; Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology; and the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Dec-2001
Nanoskin
These self-assembling nanostructures—as durable as seashells—may lower costs by reducing the need for expensive manufactured devices like stress detectors, chemical analyzers, and thermometers.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

3-Dec-2001
Homeland security
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently took information on three projects to DOE headquarters in Washington to brief Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham and Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge. They were part of an exhibition of more than two dozen counter-terrorism technologies sponsored by the DOE.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

26-Nov-2001
New way to make 'neuts'
Neutrons can penetrate deeply to find defects in large machine parts or tiny microdevices, elucidate the structure of biological systems and polymers, sense fluids in geological formations, and probe solids and liquids on the atomic scale.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 401-425 out of 536 stories.
<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>


 

 

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