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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 426-450 out of 511 stories.
<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

1-Oct-2001
Dendrimers: Branching out into realms of molecular architecture
Dendrimers may well become the flagship of nanotechnology's building blocks, a class of polymerized macromolecules that have the potential to provide the most exquisitely tailored forms and functions ever realized outside of nature.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Nanotubes: Superhard, superstrong, super useful
Not only do nanotubes offer a full range of electrical and thermal conductivity properties (they conduct heat better than any other known material), they're also about a hundred times stronger than steel and more durable than diamonds. Their potential for use in electronics is nothing short of mind-boggling: if all the nanotubes that could be packed into a one-half-inch cube were to be laid out end to end, they would stretch some 250,000 miles.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
The coming of the nano-age.
The emerging field of nanotechnology promises to change the way almost everything—from vaccines to computers—is designed and made.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Nanocrystals: The shape of things to come
Nanocrystals are particularly attractive as building blocks for larger structures because it's possible - even easy - to prepare nanocrystals that are highly perfect.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Award-winning gasoline reformer is a catalyst for change
Instead of spark plugs and cylinders, environmentally friendly fuel cell engines may be under the hoods of the cars of the future. But first, scientists must find a practical and economical way to supply the hydrogen gas needed to power them. Chemical engineers at Argonne have developed and patented a compact fuel processor that “reforms” ordinary gasoline into a hydrogen-rich gas to power fuel cells.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

24-Sep-2001
3-D holographic scanner for better airport security
The September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., using hi-jacked commercial airliners has sparked stringent security measures at airports across the nation. Passengers and their luggage are being physically searched before boarding every flight.

Contact: Staci Maloof
Staci.Maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for healing
Discoveries in physics have helped forge dramatic advances in cancer treatment for over a century. In 1950-54, according to the National Cancer Institute, the five-year survival rate for all cancers was 35 percent; by 2000 it was 59 percent. With early detection and treatment, the five-year survival rate for screenable cancers is now 80 percent.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for the future
The future of accelerator physics isn't just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow's discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for biomedical research
At the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for diagnosis
Advances in technology for medical diagnosis have created extraordinary new capabilities for imaging the human body. Many of medicine's most powerful diagnostic tools incorporate technology that physicists originally developed to explore the fundamental nature of matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Interdependent sciences: Physics and medicine
Many diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that have revolutionized medicine are also symbols of the interdependence of the physical and biomedical sciences. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neutron Therapy are just two of the prominent examples of the successful collaboration among innovative medical researchers, physical scientists and engineers.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Sep-2001
Nanotemplates for nanostructures
Coffee beans spilled upon a table form no pattern—they're a mess—their distribution dictated by the laws of chance. The same was generally believed true of atoms deposited upon a substrate. The first vision of a peaceable kingdom in which deposited atoms form orderly, controllable 2-D nanopatterns has been observed by researchers at the Sandia National Laboratories.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2001
Insuring safety in future nuclear power systems
A research project to help ensure the safety of future nuclear power systems is being awarded $940,000 funding for a three-phase project under the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Lab receives three-year funding for computing research
Ames Lab will be able to scale up its efforts to develop advanced scientific computing codes that can take advantage of today's extraordinary progress in computing technology thanks to the Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
A new addition for weighty research
The latest addition to the Laboratory's collection of FTICR mass spectrometers is the most powerful available commercially. It measures the mass of peptides —small structural units obtained by cutting proteins into pieces — with such sensitivity and precision that scientists can detect hundreds of thousands of peptide species in a single analysis.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Arming against online attacks
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers specializing in cyber security believe that when it comes to computer hackers, prevention is the best medicine.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Pumping up safety in refining gasoline
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new solid acid catalyst that may provide oil producers worldwide with a safer approach for refining unleaded gasoline with reasonably high octane.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Contributing to a nuclear renaissance
The Laboratory is launching an Advanced Nuclear Science and Technology Initiative (ANSTI), under the leadership of senior scientist Leonard Bond. "Nuclear science and technology is a major component of the Laboratory's current activities," Bond said. "ANSTI is building on our existing capabilities to support a national nuclear renaissance."

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Regular checkups reduce energy use
A prototype of software developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is providing buildings across the United States with the equivalent of their own full-time doctor.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Taming the power of power
Joe Oliveira, Janet Jones-Oliveira and a team of engineering experts are taking the first steps toward developing a computer model of the way our country's electrical generating and transmission, distribution and end-user systems operate. This is a daunting challenge because the systems have changed radically in recent years.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
On ALERT for energy savings
In early 2001, Pacific Northwest's Michael Kintner-Meyer developed the concept for the program later identified as ALERT—Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques. His idea was to conduct assessments of federal facilities to identify and implement low-cost or no-cost measures to reduce energy demand and consumption when California's energy system is at its peak, minimizing the potential for blackouts.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Laboratory wins four R&D 100 Awards
Four technologies developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and their collaborators are on R&D Magazine's list of the 100 most significant technology developments for 2000.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gove
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Landmine detector, cellular research honored by Discover Magazine
Two scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were among the nine Discover Magazine Innovation Award winners named in June. Discover Magazine and the Christopher Columbus Foundation recognized Robert Wind and Richard A. Craig, both physicists, for their technologies that address vital health and humanitarian issues.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
New lens could help find cancer tumors earlier
The new lens technology, developed by scientists at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, uses gamma rays diffracted by a set of 828 copper crystal cubes arranged in 13 concentric rings in a disk slightly smaller than a dinner plate. The lens focuses the gamma radiation emitted from a small radioactive source in the body of a patient into a small, well-shielded detector.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
Mysterious material has unusual electrical properties
In the July 27, 2001, issue of Science magazine, the scientists describe findings that offer the first clues to explain the material's newly discovered, unusual electrical properties. This work may lead to applications using the material to store electrical charge in high-performance capacitors, and offer insight into how charges behave on the nanoscale-on the order of billionths of a meter.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 426-450 out of 511 stories.
<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

 

 

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