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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 451-475 out of 512 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

20-Aug-2001
Mysterious material has unusual electrical properties
In the July 27, 2001, issue of Science magazine, the scientists describe findings that offer the first clues to explain the material's newly discovered, unusual electrical properties. This work may lead to applications using the material to store electrical charge in high-performance capacitors, and offer insight into how charges behave on the nanoscale-on the order of billionths of a meter.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Aug-2001
New magnetic semiconductor material spins hope for quantum computing
The future of quantum computing offers the potential for substantially greater data storage and faster processing speeds, but its advancement has been limited by the absence of certain critically important materials—in particular, a semiconductor that is magnetic at room temperature. Now, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a semiconductor material that has superior magnetic properties at room temperature.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
R & D 100 Award is fourth for Ed Yeung and 15th for Ames Lab
Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences, has won a 2001 R&D 100 Award for a remarkable advance in chemical separation technology called multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab researcher's team shines in protein folding predictions
The protein folding puzzle – determining the3--D structure of a protein given the sequence of its amino acids – is one of the major unsolved problems in molecular biology. A Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist along with a colleague and his students were recently recognized as the most successful team in an annual worldwide assessment of progress in protein structure prediction.

Contact: Charlie Strauss
cems@lanl.gov
505-665-4838
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Riding the d-wave
A paper appearing in a recent issue of the journal Nature has helped validate a theory on the enigmatic nature of superconducting materials that was first advanced by Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Alexander Balatsky and his colleagues five years ago. The confirmation of the theory is another step in solving the enigma of superconductivity.

Contact: Alexander Balatsky
avb@lanl.gov
505-665-0077
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab builds world's first neptunium sphere
For the first time ever, a cross-section of nuclear materials scientists and technicians at the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has fashioned an eight- kilogram tungsten-and nickel-clad sphere of neptunium. The actinide metal sphere will be used in criticality safety and nuclear non-proliferation experiments at Technical Area 18, the critical experiments facility.

Contact: Larry Ussery
LUSSERY@LANL.GOV
505-665-0207
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Jul-2001
Building the buckyball -- A bowl at a time
Showing a new, naturally occurring compound to a research chemist is, in a way, like throwing down a gauntlet. The unspoken challenge being issued — create this in the lab. For Peter Rabideau, that gauntlet has been the buckyball. Rabideau, an Ames Laboratory senior chemist, has moved a step closer to meeting that challenge by developing a practical means of producing bowl-shaped segments — buckybowls — that could eventually be pieced together to form the complete ball.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

26-Jul-2001
Are the digits of pi random? A Berkeley Lab researcher may hold the key
Pi, the ubiquitous number whose first few digits are 3.14159, is irrational, which means that its digits run on forever (by now they have been calculated to billions of places) and never repeat in a cyclical fashion. Numbers like pi are also thought to be "normal," which means that their digits are random in a certain statistical sense.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
The great solar car race: Cars will race along Route 66 without a drop of gas
As many as 40 race cars will leave Chicago July 15 in the first-ever attempt to travel America's historic Route 66 without spending a penny on gasoline. In a year that has seen unpredictable energy and gasoline prices, these drivers are betting that sunshine will take them all the way to Los Angeles, a feat that has never been tried in the 75-year history of the highway.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Drug delivery right on target
One of the challenges in treating cancerous tumors with chemotherapy and medical isotopes is maximizing the treatment of cancer cells while minimizing the potential for harming healthy tissue. With materials being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, a more targeted approach might be on the way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Clearing up core corrosion cracking
In a project with the Electric Power Research Institute (now officially known as EPRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is taking a closer look at what causes corrosion or cracking in reactor core components. With collaborative funding from more than seven countries and a dozen agencies, researchers are studying core component materials to build an understanding of the radiation-induced material changes that promote environmental cracking.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
MicroCATS in space
Through a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Laboratory is furthering the development of micro chemical and thermal systems, or MicroCATS, for chemical processing in space applications. The contract calls for both ground testing and testing in reduced-gravity situations. For Ward TeGrotenhuis and Susie Stenkamp of the Laboratory's chemical and biological processes development group, this means that one or both of them may be experiencing weightlessness and performing mid-air laboratory tests.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Counting cosmic rays
In a cooperative effort, Pacific Northwest built the hardware and NASA supplied the software for the device nicknamed MARIE, for Mars Radiation Environment Experiment.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Biomolecular Networks Initiative launches Web site
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory introduced a new Web site in April to share information about its Biomolecular Networks Initiative.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
A new look at old fission mysteries
When theoretical physicist Peter Möller worked on his thesis at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1973, his calculation of the nuclear potential energy for 175 different nuclear shapes, or grid points, pushed the limits of existing computational power. Using one IBM computer punch card to define each grid point, Möller's total input data card deck for the calculation was about one inch thick.

Contact: Peter Moller
moller@lanl.govW
505-665-2210
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
High-temperature superconducting tape licensed
Los Alamos National Laboratory has licensed patents and applications related to its technology for manufacturing high-temperature superconducting tape to IGC-SuperPower of Latham, N.Y., a wholly owned subsidiary of Intermagnetics General Corp.

Contact: Dean Peterson, Brian Newnam
dpeterson@lanl.gov
505-665-3030
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Argonne Wakefield Accelerator supplies more Big Bang for buck
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated a technique — called wakefield acceleration — that can power a linear, high-energy particle accelerator by using a low-energy particle accelerator like a booster in a multistage rocket. This could make possible collisions powerful enough to generate particles not seen since the Big Bang.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5501
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Faster, lighter computers possible with nanotechnology
Smaller, lighter computers and an end to worries about electrical failures sending hours of on-screen work into an inaccessible limbo mark the potential result of Argonne research on tiny ferroelectric crystals.

Contact: Richard Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
630-252-5565
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
New life for old scrap
Scott Chumbley and Alan Russell, two Ames Laboratory researchers have refined a process that makes it commercially viable to recover the neodymium from tons of stockpiled magnetic scrap.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Jun-2001
Keeping trucks and the nation on the road to prosperity
The 21st Century Truck Partnership aims to secure the future of the nation's trucking industry by developing technologies to increase safety, fuel economy, performance, and to lower emissions. It combines the resources and capabilities of the Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency, and 16 industrial partners.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20-Jun-2001
2001 Discover Magazine Innovation Awards
Discover Magazine and the Christopher Columbus Foundation recognized scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a ceremony today for developing two innovative technologies that will address vital health and humanitarian issues.

Contact: Staci Maloof
Staci.Maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Disease detectives
ORNL researchers are developing two types of miniaturized devices for diagnosing diseases. These devices are based on cantilevers and biochips.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Controlling carbon in hybrid poplar trees
ORNL scientists are helping to search for genes that could allow the creation of trees that store more carbon and offer higher-value products.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
SNS and biological research
Three world-class biological instruments are being designed for the Spallation Neutron Source. They will help biologists determine the atomic-level structure of proteins and other signaling compounds that allow cells to communicate and coordinate activities across an organism. The research could lead to safer, more effective drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Microbe probe
ORNL researchers are using gene chips, mass spectrometry, and computational analysis to understand what microbe genes do.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 451-475 out of 512 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>

 

 

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