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Features Archive

Showing stories 101-125 out of 139 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

30-Sep-2002
Cooking up a better cathode
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing new cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Their goal is to find a cathode material that will produce high power in the range of 600 to 800 degrees Celsius--low compared to the more typical SOFC operating temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

10-Sep-2002
A thousand years of climate change
Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have just completed a 1,000-year run of a powerful new climate system model on a supercomputer at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Exploring the machinery of life
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is building a systems biology program to unlock the mysteries of living systems. This new approach to biological research may lead to revolutionary solutions to challenges such as global warming, energy generation and treatment of diseases.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Fast glass!
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center have developed a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste. Vitrification is a process that combines concentrated radioactive waste with glass-forming materials.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Jul-2002
Climate monitoring goes mobile
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists now have the capability to document atmospheric and climate change at locations nearly anywhere in the world, thanks to a new mobile atmospheric monitoring system developed at the Laboratory.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Jul-2002
Air quality study focuses on New England
In an effort to identify why the Northeastern US has some of the worst air quality in the country, NOAA's largest research vessel, along with the Department of Energy's Gulfstream research aircraft, will monitor air pollutants and their transport in the region this summer.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Jul-2002
Global climate change research at Brookhaven
BNL scientists are simulating the atmosphere of the mid-21st century to see how increased levels of carbon dioxide and other trace gases may affect various ecosystems.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
World-class climate modeling
Some of the world’s largest global climate models are being run on ORNL’s supercomputers, providing insights for national and international assessments of the effects of global warming caused by human activities.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

6-Mar-2002
New projects to explore 'breakthrough' ideas for capturing, storing carbon gases
As part of its efforts to develop "breakthrough" approaches for reducing the threat of global climate change, the Department has added three new projects to develop ways to capture carbon dioxide released from power plants and safely prevent it from entering the atmosphere.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

3-Mar-2002
Atmospheric aerosols found to brighten clouds
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Purdue University combine satellite data with model calculations to study whether atmospheric aerosols increase the brightness of clouds enough to have a potential impact on climate. Higher reflectivity of brighter clouds may result in global cooling, partially offsetting the greenhouse effect. The Brookhaven-Purdue study was reported in the February 19, 2002 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Giving an EDGE to sustainable design
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed tools for sustainable design, a term that describes a systematic approach to ensuring that facilities, products and processes are addressing the "triple bottom line" - the environment, economics and social equity.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Chemicals sign in
To improve analyses, Pacific Northwest scientists are developing a chemical kinetics chamber that tracks various chemical reactions in a controlled environment and provides information on the chemical signatures present.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Feb-2002
New project to develop Web tool for analyzing air quality in Ohio River Valley
A new project in DOE's Fossil Energy program will compile massive amounts of air quality data collected over three years from half a dozen sampling stations and make the information available to researchers and regulators over the Internet. The web tool will be especially useful in future State actions to regulate microscopic PM2.5 particles.

Contact: Joe Culver
joe.culver@netl.doe.gov
304-285-4822
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

1-Feb-2002
Researchers reach to the skies to reveal the secrets of the stars
In 2003, Argonne scientists will analyze solar wind--single atoms and electrically charged particles from the sun--samples from NASA's Genesis mission in an effort to better understand how the planets formed and how the sun works. If successful, Genesis will become the first mission to return a sample of extraterrestrial material from beyond the moon. These samples will allow a precise measure of the elemental and isotopic composition of our most important star - the sun.

Contact: Steve Koppes
s-koppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Biothreat detection takes concentration
Detecting potential biological threats is part of the Department of Energy's plan for homeland defense, and a new automated device developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a key piece in biothreat detection technology.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Retaining and retrieving data more effectively
ORNL is a co-developer of and customer for the computer industry’s leading data-storage system in terms of capacity and transfer speed. The ORNL data-storage program also includes the Probe Storage Research Facility.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

29-Oct-2001
Gene-rich pufferfish DNA decoded
Although the Fugu genome contains essentially the same genes and regulatory sequences as the human genome, it carries those genes and regulatory sequences in approximately 365 million bases as compared to the 3 billion bases that make up human DNA. With far less so-called "junk DNA" to sort through, finding genes and controlling sequences in the Fugu genome should be a much easier task.

Contact: David Gilbert
DEGilbert@lbl.gov
510-486-6096
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Award-winning gasoline reformer is a catalyst for change
Instead of spark plugs and cylinders, environmentally friendly fuel cell engines may be under the hoods of the cars of the future. But first, scientists must find a practical and economical way to supply the hydrogen gas needed to power them. Chemical engineers at Argonne have developed and patented a compact fuel processor that “reforms” ordinary gasoline into a hydrogen-rich gas to power fuel cells.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Pumping up safety in refining gasoline
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new solid acid catalyst that may provide oil producers worldwide with a safer approach for refining unleaded gasoline with reasonably high octane.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
An in-stream waste treatment technology
A waste storage lagoon at a Washington dairy is being converted into a waste treatment facility with the help of a new technology that enhances naturally occurring biological activity.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Laboratory wins four R&D 100 Awards
Four technologies developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and their collaborators are on R&D Magazine's list of the 100 most significant technology developments for 2000.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gove
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing stories 101-125 out of 139 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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