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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 76-100 out of 142 stories.
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10-Nov-2004
First, the questions
Scientists believe they are on the brink of solving some mysteries underlying the miracle of life.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
New tools of analysis
In the mid-1990s at Ohio State University, Dorothea Thompson studied a single gene and a single promoter regulating that gene as part of her doctoral thesis research.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
From cosmetics to hydrogen storageónanoscale materials push the frontier
Suresh Baskaran develops new projects in advanced materials and manufacturing technology. This includes materials and manufacturing technology for new applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion, vehicular structures, sensors and emissions control.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
PNNL co-leads Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, will lead a new national Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The new center is a step toward a "hydrogen economy"--an economy based not on the fossil fuels we use today, but on clean, abundant hydrogen fuels. It is one of three Department of Energy "Centers of Excellence" aimed at enabling use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Glimpses of global warming
As greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere, many questions arise concerning how fast and in what ways Earth's environment will change. For example, in the United States, will increased emissions of carbon dioxide from coal combustion in the 21 st century make the Southeast wetter or drier over the next 100 years? Will changes in temperature and moisture conditions make certain U.S. regions more vulnerable to insect-borne diseases?

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Aug-2004
Soil's a natural for storing CO2
In a field outside Charleston, S.C., PNNL's Jim Amonette and his colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have planted 72 pots with Sudan grass. They don't care much about the grass, however--it's the soil beneath that captures their attention.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Helping water managers ensure clean and reliable supplies
MOST Americans take cheap and plentiful supplies of pure drinking water for granted. Some even consider it to be an inalienable right. However, clean water sources, especially pristine underground aquifers, are being consumed at an increasing rate, and contaminants and changing patterns in rain and snowfall are threatening the adequacy of supplies.

Contact: Robin Newmark
newmark1@llnl.gov
925-423-3644
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
SARS foam- Sandia foams fight SARS virus
In a series of tests conducted at Kansas State University on Bovine coronavirus (BCV) -- the internationally accepted surrogate for the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus -- Sandia versions of its DF- 200 formulation fully inactivated samples in one minute or less.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

5-Apr-2004
Engine shows diesel efficiency without the emissions
Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced harmful emissions.

Contact: Salvador Aceves
aceves6@llnl.gov
925-422-0864
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

22-Mar-2004
DOE scientists sample the skies
This summer, scientists from the DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will be participating in the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICART2) experiment, an effort to understand how pollutants from the Northeastern U.S. affect climate and air quality as they spread over the North Atlantic Ocean.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

3-Mar-2004
Just say 'no' to adenovirus
Description of research on adenovirus at Brookhaven National Laboratory suggesting that nitric oxide might work as an antiviral agent.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Feb-2004
One person's garbage is another's power
The Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Wash., has turned to the garbage dump to power its operations. One hundred percent of MSL's electrical energy needs now are supplied by "green power" provided by methane gas from a sanitary waste landfill. Green power refers to environmentally preferred power, generated by resources regarded as having certain environmental benefits--such as wind, solar and geothermal.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Nov-2003
Military extends 'protect and defend' motto to the ecosystem
Experts in hydrology, soils, remote sensing and wildlife habitat analysis from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing technologies that will help the U.S. Army's Yakima Training Center assess how military training exercises impact the site's arid ecosystem and make decisions about land use. The YTC is located in Washington state.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Sep-2003
Supernovae shape up for cosmology
A collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the European Southern Observatory, and the University of Texas has yielded the discovery that Type 1a supernovae do not explode spherically. This discovery marks the first time that the intrinsic polarization of a normal Type 1a supernova has been detected.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

14-Jul-2003
Sea salt study provides better understanding of climate modeling
A recent study by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of California, Irvine, has provided a new understanding of sea salt's role in atmospheric chemistry. This study--focusing on sulfur dioxide and its conversion to sulfuric acid in air--will allow scientists to more accurately predict and capture information in models related to regional or global warming. Results of the study are reported in the July 3, 2003, issue of Science Express.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
Photosynthesis shines as remediation tool
Marine construction, wood treatment, agricultural chemical production, chlorine production-- for decades we have been dumping waste into our harbors, many of which are now considered some of the most contaminated hazardous waste sites in the United States. Battelle researchers at PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory have developed a promising technique for remediating contaminated sediments in seawater and freshwater ecosystems.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
New product offers alternative to toxic deicers
With the U.S. military using nearly 3 million gallons of toxic glycol-based deicer a year in addition to the nearly 30 million gallons of aircraft deicing fluid commercial airlines use, the U.S. Department of Defense looked to Battelle for a more environmentally friendly solution to deice aircraft. Working together, Battelle researchers at PNNL and Columbus, Ohio, developed a safe, biodegradable, nonglycol based product--Degradable by Design DeicerTM or D3.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2003
No more free ride for phytoplankton
They may not be terrorists, but they can be sneaky--phytoplankton. These single-celled algae can sneak into nonindigenous harbors and coastal waters via ships' ballast water. Toxins from the phytoplankton can be taken up by shellfish and become harmful to humans who consume the shellfish.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-May-2003
EMSL generates impact beyond fundamental science
The research conducted at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) does more than contribute to a basic understanding of the world around us. It also helps to improve the environment, ensure national security, advance health care, and promote clean energy through real-world applications. The following research projects demonstrate the diversity of EMSL's scientific contributions.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

3-Apr-2003
Los Alamos' 60th anniversary
As it turns 60 years old, Los Alamos National Laboratory holds a special place in the modern-day genealogy of science and technology, says George "Pete" Nanos, the laboratory's interim director. "We are proud of our accomplishments. However, we will never rest on our laurels or be held motionless by the past."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

27-Jan-2003
Best rookie year ever for a supernova search facility
Researchers at the Nearby Supernova Factory, based at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have discovered 34 supernovae during the system's first year of operation. This discovery was announced at the 201st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January 2003.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Dec-2002
Sea squirt DNA sheds light on vertebrate evolution
A study of the genome of Ciona intestinalis - the sea squirt - by an international consortium of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute has yielded new insights into the origins of complex biological systems. Results are reported in the December 13, 2002, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Charles Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

19-Dec-2002
2002: A big year for accomplishments at Los Alamos
In the tradition of "years in review" published nearly everywhere, John Browne, director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has published a sampling of technical accomplishments at this Department of Energy lab during 2002.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

25-Nov-2002
Los Alamos helps forecast frequency of giant meteors
A system operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and used to "listen" for clandestine nuclear tests has played a key role in helping scientists more accurately determine how often Earth is hammered by giant meteors.

Contact: James Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 142 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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