U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 51-75 out of 101 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

31-Jul-2002
PNNL applies risk assessment techniques to health care
Hospitals are for healing. With the help of tools used in the nuclear, aerospace and chemical industries, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are helping make sure they stay that way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2-Jul-2002
Obesity research at Brookhaven
Brookhaven scientists are using positron emission tomography to study the role of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of reward and pleasure, in human obesity.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
More clues about obesity revealed by brain-imaging study
The idea that obese people eat too much because they find food more palatable than lean people do has gained support from a new brain-imaging study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study reveals that the parts of the brain responsible for sensation in the mouth, lips, and tongue are more active in obese people than in normal-weight control subjects.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

10-Jun-2002
New food-addiction link found
In a new study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists have found that the mere sight/smell of food spikes levels of a brain "pleasure" chemical called dopamine. The study is reported in the June 1, 2002, issue of the journal Synapse.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-May-2002
The Milano mutation: A rare protein mutation offers new hope for heart disease patients
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered the mechanism by which an extremely rare protein mutation shields people from cardiovascular disease. The discovery could lead to more potent drug therapies that target both cholesterol deposition and prevent future accumulation. Results were reported in the February 12, 2002, issue of the journal Biochemistry.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-May-2002
HERPES database online
To aid in the search for cures and vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a publicly available Web database containing the Human herpesvirus 2 genomic sequence.

Contact: Shelley Thompson
shelley@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling blood flow during CPR
Thanks to computer modeling, a scientific discovery was made that might lead to a way to save victims of cardiac arrest.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Apr-2002
Brain-imaging study offers clues to inhalant abuse—huffing
First images of inhalants in the brain reveal why solvents may be so addictive, in a Department of Energy Brookhaven National Laboratory study, which will appear in the April 26 issue of the journal Life Sciences.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-Apr-2002
World's largest, most powerful NMR spectrometer
The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory celebrated the arrival of the world's largest, highest-performance nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer—a first-of-its-kind 900 megahertz (MHz) wide-bore system developed by Oxford Instruments and Varian Inc.

Contact: PNNL Public Affairs
inquiry@pnl.gov
888-375-7665
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
New standard in sensor technology
The Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and the University of Michigan integrated basic research in two separate areas—organic light-emitting devices and fluorescent sensors—to develop an innovative new OLED/optical chemical sensor with possible wide-ranging applications such as medical testing, drug discovery, and pathogen detection.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Mar-2002
Tracking down virulence in plague
How do the plague pathogen and its host interact? Scientists will apply the answer to understanding a larger set of possible agents of biological terrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
New study reveals differences in patients' response to ritalin
Findings of a new brain imaging study at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory may explain the variation in doses needed to treat attention/hyperactivity disorder. The study appears in the March 1, 2002 issue of the journal Synapse.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

7-Jan-2002
Molecular structure of cancer-related proteins identified
Scientists have identified the biochemical and signaling properties of two cancer-related proteins using a process called X-ray crystallography. The technique yielded the first-ever detailed pictures of the proteins interacting with each other, indicating which areas are most essential for the development of cancer.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmucnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Rapid field detection of biological agents
Livermore scientists have developed two portable biodetection systems to help in the fight against bioterrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Oct-2001
Idaho Accelerator Center leads the way in research and education
The Idaho Accelerator Center stands as a monument to the future--using science to develop devices to further national security, healthcare, and business.

Contact: James Jones
jlj@inel.gov
208-526-1730
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
Cancer-detecting microchip
clever technique for detecting proteins by inducing them to stick to and bend a microscopic cantilever—essentially a diving board the size of a hair—is sensitive enough to serve as a diagnostic assay for the protein markers characteristic of prostate cancer, a team of scientists report in the September issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rls@pa.urel.berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

15-Oct-2001
Spinach protein could offer new hope for the blind
Spinach, touted in the Popeye cartoon for its ability to strengthen the body, may prove even more valuable for restoring vision to people who are legally blind. People who suffer from age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa, diseases that are leading causes of blindness worldwide, may find hope in this research.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
How some viruses take strong hold of cells
As part of an ongoing effort to understand how viruses infect cells, scientists at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory have deciphered the molecular-level interaction between coxsackievirus—which infects the heart, brain, pancreas, and other organs—and the human cell protein to which it attaches. This work may lead to improved ways to thwart viral infections, and may help scientists design virus-based vehicles for gene therapy.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Taking the heat off: Nanofluids promise efficient heat transfer
By manipulating atoms on the smallest of scales, Argonne scientists have created a next-generation fluid that may revolutionize heat transfer. By adding tiny spherical particles to a conventional fluid, researchers can improve by up to 40 percent its ability to transfer heat.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Travels of a young physicist
A young physicist recounts his career from the University of California at Berkeley and the laboratories of Alexander Pines, famed pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for healing
Discoveries in physics have helped forge dramatic advances in cancer treatment for over a century. In 1950-54, according to the National Cancer Institute, the five-year survival rate for all cancers was 35 percent; by 2000 it was 59 percent. With early detection and treatment, the five-year survival rate for screenable cancers is now 80 percent.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for the future
The future of accelerator physics isn't just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow's discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Neutrons against cancer
The idea to build a Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab developed in the early 1970s when physicians and physicists shared a vision: to wield accelerator technology to combat cancer. Today, more than 3,100 patients have come to Fermilab in the hope of finding a cure for some of the worst tumors known in the medical field.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for diagnosis
Advances in technology for medical diagnosis have created extraordinary new capabilities for imaging the human body. Many of medicine's most powerful diagnostic tools incorporate technology that physicists originally developed to explore the fundamental nature of matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 101 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map