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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 76-100 out of 102 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

14-Sep-2001
Tools for diagnosis
Advances in technology for medical diagnosis have created extraordinary new capabilities for imaging the human body. Many of medicine's most powerful diagnostic tools incorporate technology that physicists originally developed to explore the fundamental nature of matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Interdependent sciences: Physics and medicine
Many diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that have revolutionized medicine are also symbols of the interdependence of the physical and biomedical sciences. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neutron Therapy are just two of the prominent examples of the successful collaboration among innovative medical researchers, physical scientists and engineers.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Better lighting the next bright idea in improving productivity?
A consortium of major building companies, government agencies and nonprofit organizations is exploring the connection between productivity and a well-lit workplace.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Landmine detector, cellular research honored by Discover Magazine
Two scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were among the nine Discover Magazine Innovation Award winners named in June. Discover Magazine and the Christopher Columbus Foundation recognized Robert Wind and Richard A. Craig, both physicists, for their technologies that address vital health and humanitarian issues.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Spectra library ready for check out
A new e-commerce site introduced by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory may provide information that can be used, for example, in monitoring trace gases in the atmosphere or in improving chemical processes to demonstrate compliance with government guidelines.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Sep-2001
Saliva monitoring system could end the need for the needle
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing a saliva monitoring approach that may prove to be a noninvasive, faster alternative to typical methods for monitoring exposure to harmful chemicals.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

27-Aug-2001
New breast cancer gene found
To the small list of genes that play a role in the development of breast cancer can now be added the name ZNF217. Multiple copies of this gene were found to remove natural restrictions on cell growth and thereby increase the chances for malignancy in a study jointly conducted by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
New lens could help find cancer tumors earlier
The new lens technology, developed by scientists at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, uses gamma rays diffracted by a set of 828 copper crystal cubes arranged in 13 concentric rings in a disk slightly smaller than a dinner plate. The lens focuses the gamma radiation emitted from a small radioactive source in the body of a patient into a small, well-shielded detector.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
R & D 100 Award is fourth for Ed Yeung and 15th for Ames Lab
Ed Yeung, program director of Chemical and Biological Sciences, has won a 2001 R&D 100 Award for a remarkable advance in chemical separation technology called multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using absorption detection.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
Radiation treatment in ducks may offer clues to brain tumors in children
The Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has tested an experimental microbeam radiation therapy on duck embryos that may offer clues about how to treat brain tumors in infants and young children.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
More than the bare bones for implant patients
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers developed a unique bone-like coating process that addresses the problem of poor bonds between artificial joints and real bone. It could potentially increase the useful life of hip, knee and other joint replacements as well as dental implants.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Drug delivery right on target
One of the challenges in treating cancerous tumors with chemotherapy and medical isotopes is maximizing the treatment of cancer cells while minimizing the potential for harming healthy tissue. With materials being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, a more targeted approach might be on the way.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Radiation bystander effects
An important discovery about the effects of low-level radiation on cells is altering long-held beliefs about risk assessment in radiation exposure.

Contact: Bruce Lehnert
lehnert@lanl.gov
505-667-2753
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Disease detectives
ORNL researchers are developing two types of miniaturized devices for diagnosing diseases. These devices are based on cantilevers and biochips.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
A model fish for pollutant studies
The zebrafish is a model organism for studying the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gene and protein expression.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
SNS and biological research
Three world-class biological instruments are being designed for the Spallation Neutron Source. They will help biologists determine the atomic-level structure of proteins and other signaling compounds that allow cells to communicate and coordinate activities across an organism. The research could lead to safer, more effective drugs.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Lab on a chip used for protein studies
ORNL's lab on a chip is being used commercially to identify proteins and shows promise for drug discovery and disease screening.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Jun-2001
New findings on breast cancer reported at the annual AAAS meeting
New experimental findings by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) cell biologist Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff show that exposure to ionizing radiation creates a microenvironment in the tissue surrounding breast cells that can cause even nonirradiated cells and their progeny to become cancerous. The discovery suggests new and possibly more effective means for preventing breast cancer.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Stable isotope research resource
The ability to apply research techniques to important problems in biology and medicine depends on the availability of isotopically labeled compounds.

Contact: Clifford Unkefer
cju@lanl.gov
505-665-2560
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Early detection for protection
Being able to rapidly detect biological agents is among the most difficult and yet urgent tasks facing the nation. Whether the threat is from a natural outbreak or a terrorist's release of threat agents, medical treatment cannot effectively begin without first identifying the bioagent. At the same time, effective understanding and response to a biological threat requires rapid communication across the health-care system.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Using pathogen sequence data
As scientists delve into the vast quantity of biological data currently being produced, the problems of handling such a treasure trove of information are daunting. New tools and techniques for managing, storing, analyzing, mining and visualizing this information are the focus of much attention in the scientific community, especially when the data can have a bearing on public health and even emergency response.

Contact: Paul Jackson
glm@lanl.gov
505-665-7985
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unraveling anthrax
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bioscience Division researchers have developed technologies that can uniquely identify the origins of biological organisms based on information in the DNA.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Rapid Syndrome Validation Project
Los Alamos National Laboratory is collaborating on a new tool that will provide public health officials with an early warning and response system for threats to public health.

Contact: Sandra Zink
zink@lanl.gov
505-667-5260
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Optical biopsy studied as breast cancer treatment aid
Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women aged 40-59 and was expected to total more than 45,000 deaths in the United States last year, according to the American Cancer Society. A Los Alamos National Laboratory-developed technology, the Optical Biopsy System (OBS), may aid in not only the diagnosis of breast cancer, but the success of the surgical treatment as well.

Contact: Judith Mourant
jmourant@lanl.gov
505-665-1190
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Unmasking the mysteries of chronic beryllium disease
Beryllium is a unique lightweight metal used in nuclear weapons and, in the commercial sector, for telescope mirrors, golf clubs and a variety of other applications. While solid beryllium and beryllium alloys are safe, fine particulate beryllium is hazardous if inhaled.

Contact: Babetta Marrone
blm@lanl.gov
505-667-3279
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 102 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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